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Author Topic: Scan Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 for Black & White Image  (Read 887 times)

EinstStein

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Scan Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 for Black & White Image
« on: November 28, 2019, 05:12:32 pm »

Not sure this is the proper forum, but I couldn't find a better one.

The question is about the B&W pictures fro scanning the Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 (35mm film).

Besides digital, I also shoot B&W films and scan to get B&W pictures.  For 35mm camera, I usually have Kodak Tri-X 400 and Tmax 400. I appreciate Tri-x tonal appearance and Tmax grain appearance.

Recently I heard Superia X-tra 400 has even finer grain than Tmax, and due to the color films, even with the standard C41 film processing, the tonal appearance is much more adjustable in the post processing. The cost of it is also much cheaper than the B&W films (after including the C41 chemical). 

I wonder if anyone has done this to give a comment.
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smthopr

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Re: Scan Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 for Black & White Image
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2019, 02:10:28 pm »

Not sure this is the proper forum, but I couldn't find a better one.

The question is about the B&W pictures fro scanning the Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 (35mm film).

Besides digital, I also shoot B&W films and scan to get B&W pictures.  For 35mm camera, I usually have Kodak Tri-X 400 and Tmax 400. I appreciate Tri-x tonal appearance and Tmax grain appearance.

Recently I heard Superia X-tra 400 has even finer grain than Tmax, and due to the color films, even with the standard C41 film processing, the tonal appearance is much more adjustable in the post processing. The cost of it is also much cheaper than the B&W films (after including the C41 chemical). 

I wonder if anyone has done this to give a comment.

I haven't used this Fuji film "Superia x-tra 400", but Fuji used to make a cinema film with similar technology.  The "claim", I think was that it was more forgiving for mixed lighting situations.  I never much liked the color reproduction, but that might not matter much for b&w conversions.

In general, with films like these, the grainyness of the film depends somewhat on the exposure, with fine grained mid tones and highlights, and increasing graininess towards the darker parts of the image.  For finer grained results, overall, I might suggest over exposing 1/2 - full stop.
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Bruce Alan Greene
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