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Author Topic: Revealing Forces  (Read 1613 times)

rabanito

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Re: Revealing Forces
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2019, 03:56:35 pm »

But that is what I am saying here Rabanito:

I am only trying to expllain what I think Russ is saying and that we should try to utilise every pixel of the frame in our compositions, but which obviously also excludes the cropping for format or aspect ration etc..

Sorry, but I thought I had explained that in my overly looooong winded reply  :D

Dave


Uh-oh. :(
Sometimes my fingers are faster than my brain.
 Glad to have to take everything back.
My apologies :)
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RSL

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Re: Revealing Forces
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2019, 04:21:56 pm »

Believe it or not, Dave, I agree with you 100%, and I'm not tied forever to the 3 x 2 aspect ratio of 35mm film as HCB was. In Korea and later I worked with 2 1/4 x 2 1/4, and framed appropriately. Later on I worked with 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 view cameras, and framed for them. I currently use my Nikons at 3 x 2, and my favorite Olympus Pen-F at 4 x 3, and frame appropriately. But, as you point out, the camera you have in your hands doesn't always frame as you want it to, so you make your shot realizing that you're going to crop. That's not what I object to.

I object to the guy who sees something he likes and bangs away, probably putting what he saw at the center of his frame without any consideration for the geometry of the resulting picture or where everything else is in relation to the object of his affections, then tries to frame the picture properly by cropping. The result frequently is less than satisfactory and obviously is a crop. As you say, you want as many of the pixels in your camera as possible in on the result, but you also need to think about geometry when you frame.

All that is why I said, in "On Street Photography" (https://luminous-landscape.com/on-street-photography): "First, you need to practice composition to the point where it becomes intuitive. You donít have time to line up all those elements of geometry with, say, the rule of thirds. You have to see it whole in your viewfinder without stopping to analyze, to rely on your unconscious and to react instinctively." Once you learn to do that you'll rarely need to crop.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 07:42:36 pm by RSL »
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Russ Lewis  www.russ-lewis.com.

maddogmurph

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Re: Revealing Forces
« Reply #22 on: October 14, 2019, 03:10:21 am »

No Crop
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Maddog Murph
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Revealing Forces
« Reply #23 on: October 14, 2019, 06:20:45 am »

No Crop
Now this version has enough detail so the dark triangle works.
Just right.
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armand

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Re: Revealing Forces
« Reply #24 on: October 14, 2019, 09:37:48 am »

No Crop

I prefer your first version.
This would work too, I would lighten the foreground to have more contrast between the warm, welcoming foreground, and the cold, aloof background.  I'm a sucker for contrasting elements in a moody photo though.
In the first version the foreground occupies a much smaller portion and you can get away without that much detail in it.
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