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Author Topic: Cows.  (Read 325 times)

William Walker

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Cows.
« on: September 22, 2019, 03:39:54 am »

Something about each one of them....

LesPalenik

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2019, 07:00:21 am »

Great shot of a formidable ensemble.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2019, 09:13:49 am »

A very fine shot. From what appears to be fog in the background, to the intense scrutiny of the photographer (by the cows). 

P.S. What’s up with that single horn? Lost in battle or less careful background bleaching?   ;)

William Walker

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2019, 09:25:38 am »

A very fine shot. From what appears to be fog in the background, to the intense scrutiny of the photographer (by the cows). 

P.S. What’s up with that single horn? Lost in battle or less careful background bleaching?   ;)
Thanks Slobodan! Very heavy mist - no background (or other) tricks! The single horn is part of the magic!!

We left early in the morning with the intention of doing some landscape over our friendly farmer's new dam... but it turned into our mutual "friend" Michael Kenna's type of weather!

I see from the various boards that you are still in fine fettle!!  :)

RSL

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2019, 10:38:21 am »

Another splendid shot, William. Love it!

kers

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2019, 04:09:26 pm »

Indeed a bunch of personalities..!  congrats
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2019, 05:02:35 pm »

Another splendid shot, William. Love it!
+1.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes (visit my website: http://myrvaagnes.com)

Jeremy Roussak

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2019, 03:01:36 am »

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stamper

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2019, 03:46:10 am »

I agree with all of the praise!

stamper

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Rob C

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2019, 04:12:33 am »

It's common sense. No pun etc.

Cows know what we hope to be doing with them later on. How many of them have to vanish into a trailer before the longer-term residents realise nobody's coming back - that it's a one-way trip for them?

I'd be pretty pissed off too with the two-legged community, not that I'm not already to some degree. And I'm not yet a cow!

;-)

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #12 on: September 23, 2019, 09:21:52 am »

Hey, in the U.K., even cows are mad ;)

rabanito

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #13 on: September 23, 2019, 11:25:44 am »

And taken, perhaps, at considerable personal risk: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/sep/20/coroner-urges-public-awareness-after-cattle-kill-elderly-woman

Jeremy

Usually cows are especially dangerous when with calves and more so if you're with a dog-
The dog could be the first victim
One should expect a warning notice by the farmer, as they do with electrified fences
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RSL

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2019, 10:13:42 am »

Jeremy Roussak

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2019, 12:51:55 pm »

William IS NOT an elderly woman, Jeremy.

Neither his name nor his photograph suggests that he is, I concede. I rather doubt he's any less vulnerable to trampling by cows than if he were, though.

Jeremy
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2019, 01:34:00 pm »

Two anecdotes about cows from my experience:

1) When I was a kid and visiting my grandfather's farm, cows were coming home in the evening. Several of us were there, and among us a guest, woman, and city-dweller. We were completely accustomed to the event and unfazed by the approaching cows. She, however, was so scared of the cows that were still about 50 yards away and moving slowly (as cows proverbially do when coming home) that she tried to hide behind a wooden fence. To do so, she pulled apart two parts of the fence, joined by a rusty nail, to squeeze in-between and get behind the fence. Got punctured in the tummy by the nail in the process.

2) Me visiting Dorset from London. Checked into a hotel late in the afternoon and was heading toward a nearby hill to get a view of the ocean from above. The receptionist asked me to fill in a form before I leave. I said "later," she insisted. That took some time. Not too much, but those few minutes extra proved crucial in the end. There was still daylight as I was climbing up the steep hill, so I noticed a bunch of cows in the distance. By the time I reached the hilltop, the sun was already down. I noticed a lovely small island across, which by then formed a silhouette against a backdrop of deep purple sky and deep blue water. A perfect square composition I envisaged for my Hasselblad (film).

Then it occurred to me: by the time I set up the tripod, measure the light, set up the lens and camera, take a few shots, it would get pitch dark by then. I did not have a lamp with me. I glanced to my left and noticed that cows, previously away from the path, are now slowly crossing it to get down. The prospect of returning down a steep, narrow, downhill path and potentially bumping into the cows in total darkness did not appeal to me at all. So, I just turned around and started going back while there was still some light in the sky. Defeated by cows. And darkness. Cursing.

RSL

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2019, 03:05:18 pm »

Neither his name nor his photograph suggests that he is, I concede. I rather doubt he's any less vulnerable to trampling by cows than if he were, though.

Jeremy

But I'll bet William can run like the wind.

Rob C

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2019, 03:23:34 pm »

Two anecdotes about cows from my experience:

1) When I was a kid and visiting my grandfather's farm, cows were coming home in the evening. Several of us were there, and among us a guest, woman, and city-dweller. We were completely accustomed to the event and unfazed by the approaching cows. She, however, was so scared of the cows that were still about 50 yards away and moving slowly (as cows proverbially do when coming home) that she tried to hide behind a wooden fence. To do so, she pulled apart two parts of the fence, joined by a rusty nail, to squeeze in-between and get behind the fence. Got punctured in the tummy by the nail in the process.

2) Me visiting Dorset from London. Checked into a hotel late in the afternoon and was heading toward a nearby hill to get a view of the ocean from above. The receptionist asked me to fill in a form before I leave. I said "later," she insisted. That took some time. Not too much, but those few minutes extra proved crucial in the end. There was still daylight as I was climbing up the steep hill, so I noticed a bunch of cows in the distance. By the time I reached the hilltop, the sun was already down. I noticed a lovely small island across, which by then formed a silhouette against a backdrop of deep purple sky and deep blue water. A perfect square composition I envisaged for my Hasselblad (film).

Then it occurred to me: by the time I set up the tripod, measure the light, set up the lens and camera, take a few shots, it would get pitch dark by then. I did not have a lamp with me. I glanced to my left and noticed that cows, previously away from the path, are now slowly crossing it to get down. The prospect of returning down a steep, narrow, downhill path and potentially bumping into the cows in total darkness did not appeal to me at all. So, I just turned around and started going back while there was still some light in the sky. Defeated by cows. And darkness. Cursing.

You did the right thing.

Apart from cows, when you are basically a city person, you are usually unaware of just how black a moonless night really is. Ann and I found out one night up in the wilds of Perthshire, Scotland, when it came into our heads to go for a walk one night after dinner. We left my uncle's house and walked down his path to the road and promptly turned right back: we could not see one another, never mind where our feet or the road might be.

It's never like that in the city; so much light reflectd off clouds, moisture and city dust.

Imagine trench warfare in those conditions.

RSL

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Re: Cows.
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2019, 03:31:59 pm »

Right, Rob, but if it's clear and there are stars up there it's not that dark.
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