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Author Topic: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida  (Read 1590 times)

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« on: August 13, 2019, 03:12:16 pm »

Went yesterday to Naples, on the west coast of Florida, to shoot remnants of an old pier, a spot known as Old Pilings, at sunset. In spite of a persistent drizzling throughout, we were ultimately rewarded with a riot of colors.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2019, 03:17:05 pm »

As I mentioned, the drizzle was persistent and annoying. As I was shooting bracketed, I found that I quite like the +2 frames. Adds to the perceived bleakness of the landscape in the cloudy, rainy afternoon:

armand

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2019, 03:33:20 pm »

Nice, first and last are pretty wild, pushing it in terms of saturation but still on my acceptable side (barely  ;)). After all we are supposed to interpret and not record.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2019, 03:42:48 pm »

Nice, first and last are pretty wild, pushing it in terms of saturation but still on my acceptable side (barely  ;)). After all we are supposed to interpret and not record.

Well, there was some processing, of course, but not much added in terms of color or saturation to the out-of-camera shot. Surprising how how the camera "interpreted" the colors (iphone shot):

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2019, 06:04:28 pm »

Great set, Slobodan.
How much did you have to pay the pelicans to pose so nicely for you?
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2019, 06:26:43 pm »

Eric, I paid with numerous insect bites on my legs. Not sure pelicans accept such a currency, though.

armand

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2019, 07:34:40 pm »

Eric, I paid with numerous insect bites on my legs. ...

I forgot it's prime time now. What I hate about South Florida mosquitoes is that many are silent, if you don't see them you'll feel them.
You can say you paid with blood to take these.

sdwilsonsct

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2019, 03:09:05 am »

As I mentioned, the drizzle was persistent and annoying. As I was shooting bracketed, I found that I quite like the +2 frames. Adds to the perceived bleakness of the landscape in the cloudy, rainy afternoon:

Nice feeling here.

Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2019, 03:40:37 am »

Good set. #2 is my favourite.

Jeremy Roussak

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2019, 07:50:33 am »

As I mentioned, the drizzle was persistent and annoying. As I was shooting bracketed, I found that I quite like the +2 frames. Adds to the perceived bleakness of the landscape in the cloudy, rainy afternoon:

Best of a good set, I think.

Jeremy
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LesPalenik

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2019, 11:08:42 pm »

As I mentioned, the drizzle was persistent and annoying. As I was shooting bracketed, I found that I quite like the +2 frames. Adds to the perceived bleakness of the landscape in the cloudy, rainy afternoon:

Nice image and great composition, Slobodan. And your signature logo is another pretty element, exceptionally well placed.
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RMW

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2019, 02:18:18 pm »

Masterful !
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Kevin Gallagher

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2019, 03:05:26 pm »

 Wow, very good Slobodan!! I even like the +2 one. I expect to make it to the family's place in West Palm come the colder weather. We should hook up with Russ and try those variations on The Manhattan that were were talking about ;)
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Dave (Isle of Skye)

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2019, 09:47:55 am »

Some nice colours here and a very enjoyable scene that looks well exposed, but its the old 'Touching Edges Problem' that kills the sunset shots for me I am afraid.

I used to tell photographers (if they were willing to listen of course), that I have found that any landscape or seascape scene usually works better, if I shoot it from an angle that avoids any touching edges anywhere along the horizon line wherever possible.

I used to also then tell them that if they couldn't get high enough to lower the edges of the foreground objects beneath the horizon line, then they should try to get lower so that the objects then appeared to intentionally break trough the horizon line.

So not trying to have a needless pop at your work here Slobodan, as I know you are a really good, published photographer, that none the less still appreciates a genuine and considered critique of your work and so even though I would probably not dare to offer this type of feedback to many other photographers on this site, I believe I have come to know you well enough over the years to hope that you will accept what I am saying, albeit based solely on my point of view on such matters and even though you might not agree with me.

But as always, I can only be honest (to the point of becoming really annoying my wife often tells me) and say that the sunset shots you are showing here Slobodan just don't work for me, because all I can see is the top edges of the pilings touching the horizon line.

Perhaps I have become more OCD than I realised and so this in no way troubles anyone else ???

Sorry  :)

Dave
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 09:51:10 am by Dave (Isle of Skye) »
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rabanito

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2019, 10:04:25 am »


Perhaps I have become more OCD than I realised and so this in no way troubles anyone else ???

Dave

I agree with your opinion, Dave.
I just didn't say. Sorry about that.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2019, 10:32:08 am »

I agree with your opinion, Dave.
I just didn't say...

Minion.

David Eckels

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2019, 11:02:48 am »

Quote
breaking the horizon line
On the other hand, breaking this "rule" creates a tension that draws attention :D to the pelicans on the pilings, at least in my view. When I first looked at these, the "horizon rule" flitted through my mind, but then I realized that Slobodan had to be composing this way deliberately. I can say this, however, my intellectual/visual/emotional response is significantly less conflicted with image #3 where the pilings are just below the horizon; that's probably why I would choose that as my favorite. Haven't seen sunsets like that since SLC, Slobodan!

rabanito

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2019, 11:50:09 am »

Minion.

Maybe, yes.
I was a little ashamed to say anything because the first thing that struck my eye was not the bad composition but the ugly "ornaments" in the sky which are worse than anything.
The bad composition is only secondary.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 11:53:53 am by rabanito »
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Arlen

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2019, 05:15:59 pm »

The tops of the posts are so close to perfectly aligned with the horizon that I just assumed it was a purposeful act of being different.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Old Pilings, Naples, Florida
« Reply #19 on: August 18, 2019, 06:30:26 pm »

...it's the old 'Touching Edges Problem' that kills the sunset shots for me...

That's it, you are not my friend anymore!

Just kidding, of course. It is a fair point.

I have a short and a long response. The short one: it is what it is. The long one (although it appears even shorter): it depends.

It depends on who is looking at (or dare I say buying?) the image. I've come to realize that photographers, in general, are a) very picky, sticklers for "rules," and are bothered by things that others simply do not notice or pay attention to and b) not (my) buyers. This isn't directed at you in particular, Dave, as I am probably the same when I look at other people's work with my photographer's hat on.

First, a bit of a background. Let's start with a list of excuses  ;)

- the drizzle was annoying
- it was hot and humid
- even hotter when I had to put my rain jacket on
- sandflies were biting me (that night I couldn't fall asleep till 6am, as I had about more than two dozen painful and itching bite marks on my legs, and for the whole week since I have been walking around Florida with my long trousers on, trying to avoid the impression of a drug user's skin lesions)
- I am lazy

As you might have noticed, in the high-key shot, the pilings are well below the horizon. That's just because I am lazy, as I said, and prefer to shoot from tripod without having to bend down or squat (age, damn it!). But then, when the sun finally started to show up, and the colors exploded, I realized I need to have the leftmost bird framed between the two clouds and silhouetted against the brighter area in-between. For that, I had to pick up the tripod and move to the left, and closer to the water line. At that point, I realized I am too high and the bird would not be against the sky, but against the much darker water. So, I battled my laziness and decided to shorten the legs (the tripod ones, obviously; I'd prefer mine extended, if possible). Since I was shooting vertical panoramas at the same time, I also had to readjust the leveling base, between the ball head and tripod. At that point, I got what I wanted: the leftmost bird nicely framed and fully above the horizon, and all the other birds as well. To get there, I had to push tripod legs into the sand as far as it would go. Lowering the legs any further would have required untigheting and retightening all three, and then re-adjusting the leveling base. Given how quickly the light changes at sunset, especially so south (it ain't Iceland, when the sunset can last for hours), I started shooting with that setting. My main focus, literally and figuratively, was on the birds at that moment, not pilings.

Now, a bit of retroactive justifications:

As I said, pilings were not my main concern at the time of shooting. However, had I thought that the shot is unusable because of that, I would have sent it to the bin already in Lightroom. Why not? In general, I agree with you about the horizon touching problem. Have I had the pilings as the main and only element in the picture, I would have agreed with you that the shot should be killed. But they are not. It's the birds. Pilings are there, but not dominant. Birds are. In retrospect, have I had the pilings protrude above the horizon, I have a feeling it would actually "pierce" the horizon in such a way to break the sense of tranquility that a long, uninterrupted horizon creates, especially in the panorama version.

If only we could see versions with different height levels, to compare. Oh, wait, we can! I was shooting with two other photographer friends, Noel de Christian and Santos López. They posted their pictures publicly in the meantime, on Instagram, so I can share them here. Santos even has both versions, above and below the horizon.

And finally, touching the horizon may not be such an anathema after all, as the Grand Master Pete Turner can attest to that ;)

Ultimately, if it annoys you - I take the blame
If it doesn't - I take the credit :)

In any case, we can have a lovely discussion about it.

P.S. For some reason, the attached images lost their authors in the description. The first one is Noel de Christian, the next two Santos López, and the last one Pete Turner



« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 06:42:33 pm by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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