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Author Topic: travelling to Ireland  (Read 1331 times)

mokenny74

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travelling to Ireland
« on: June 29, 2019, 01:16:16 am »

I am travelling to Ireland in September. More to the West of Ireland. I would appreciate recommendations for areas for photography that are off the beaten paths


Thanks
MO Kenny
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langier

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2019, 10:00:16 am »

Just back from there... If you have a car, you've got the freedom to get off the beaten path and find the authentic. Pick your subject and add Ireland to your Google search and you'll find a lot. Atlas Obscura is another good source.

Pretty much along any backroad you'll find good stuff. Program you map app or GPS to take non-toll roads and you'll be rewarded and don't be afraid to follow the two-lane roads around, just be mindful of the walls and signs tell you to Go Mall :-)

Anything labeled Neolithic is a good start. Then the ancient, first-millennial churches and monasteries are spectacular. West of Galway was as far as my journey got and that was cool--the landscape was barren, neat stone walls, cemeteries and church ruins... the Aren Islands...Connemara...Twelve Bens (Pins)... small, out of the way pubs with live music... However, even close to Dublin we found lots of castles, ruins, farms, and pubs to keep the cameras snapping.


Lots of opportunity for both landscape and cultural landscape photos and capturing daily life away from the larger tourist meccas and seldom enough time...
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Lust4Life

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2019, 08:06:41 am »

Langier,

How long was your trip?
I'm wondering if 3 weeks is enough to really cover Ireland, or does that just get you started?

Jack
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Jack

TommyWeir

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2019, 10:56:36 am »

Well, it's a country you need to drive to get to remote areas, and most US drivers do find it pretty hairy, but just take it slow and be ready for a sudden stop.

If you're going to focus on off the beaten track, then the coastal routes in Donegal, Sligo and Mayo would be less populated or visited by tourists than Kerry, Clare and Galway. Particular highlights would be

-  the northern Connemara, Clifden stretch up into Mayo toward Achill/Belmullet.  Lots to explore, mountain, bay and wilderness.
-  the Donegal coastal route, like a mini-Scotland in a way, mountain, bog, sky.
-  The more unusual islands, Inisturk or Tory if you make all the way up there.
-  Stay in Westport (lovely town) and Sligo (beautiful nearby easy-to-climb mountains), good food and pubs and culture to be had.


« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 11:02:27 am by TommyWeir »
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Lust4Life

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2019, 12:01:23 pm »

Mayo Co. is where my ancestors came over from in 1804, so that is high on the must see list.
I've actually traced my DNA back 13, 400 years to Doggerland, now submerged just off the coast of Mayo.

Thanks for the info, will research your suggestions this week.

I drove New Zealand for 6 weeks so being on the "wrong side of the road" if fine with me.

Jack
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Jack

TommyWeir

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2019, 03:19:58 pm »

The BBC podcast In Our Time did a special on Doggerland, they focussed on the section between the UK and Holland, though my understanding is that it reached around the top coast of Ireland too down past Mayo to Galway.  Anyway, it's very interesting.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0006707

Mayo is a very beautiful rugged county, the coast, the mountains, lots to photograph.

https://flic.kr/p/2bK6o5k

Jeremy Roussak

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2019, 03:28:00 am »

How long was your trip?
I'm wondering if 3 weeks is enough to really cover Ireland, or does that just get you started?

It's enough to scratch the surface.

Jeremy
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Lust4Life

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2019, 09:35:32 am »

I've been wrestling between Iceland and Ireland.
Of course, Ireland has the DNA component but from a photographic perspective has anyone been to both and can suggest?
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Jack

Lust4Life

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2019, 08:07:34 am »

Decision made, it will be Ireland.
Now, how to do it???   LOL!

I'm hoping to do a full 3 weeks and several days around County Mayo is a must.
I shoot mainly B&W but have been doing more color of late as well.  But contrast and density/depth are key.

When:
In my photography, CLOUDS are a must.  Not gray overcast, but big clouds.  As such, clear robins egg skies are a negative for me.  Best months for this?

Transportation:
Definitely rent a car - thus best/most reliable rental source?

Lodging:
What is available in Ireland that is cost effective, safe yet decent?

Food:
As I don't drink, that's one issue solved but what are their sources
for the most economical yet palatable meals?   Pubs?

Must see photographic sites/locations? 
Coastlines?  Pastural? I just seek out visual contrasts and diversity.

What am I not smart enough to know I should be remembering to ask?

Jack




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Jack

TommyWeir

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2019, 03:06:45 pm »

Okay...

Clouds, weather generally, unpredictable, no skirting around that.  The one benefit is that the weather is also hugely changeable, whatever is going on, it won't last.  If I had to pick a month to try Ireland it would be September.  Typically they are pleasant, not that hot, but sunny with plenty of change.  You may get clear mornings and dramatic evenings.

The car rental situation is same as everywhere, there's the usuals.  Probably a bit cheaper than the US if anything.  Do consider additional insurance to cover excess if you haven't already got a policy covering that.  The narrow twisty roads, especially in the scenic areas will command your attention, and you'll be challenged compared to driving in the US.  So if you're traveling with another, definitely try to have them drive, you can look out the window and spot what you like.  You'll both need to present your drivers licenses at the rental counter.

Accommodation... there's Airbnb of course. And regular old Bed and Breakfasts.  I'd mix them in, with hotels in larger towns.

You will find that in remote areas you will eat in pubs and hotels.  Lots of great food in cafes and restaurants in towns but usually out in the country, food is in a pub. You'll find plenty with espresso too, don't worry. It's not all about the drink.  Coffee culture if anything is better than the US.  Pubs vary of course, but there's a lot of standard fare.  I'd check out fish when you can, chowders etc, given the coastal aspect, but you can always look up farmers markets, great one in Galway town for example every Saturday, lots of vendors with food to eat or take away.

You could always check out Flickr and other sites for geotagged images, I tend to use Google Maps and Streetview to aid planning location visits, bearing in mind the extreme wide angle used, but definitely helps.

Dublin is cool and you will enjoy time there too, but if you're hitting the West you might consider flying into Shannon and rent from there, Clare the county is amazing and then onto Galway, you can travel along the coast towards Clifden, then north into Connemara to Leenane and then Mayo, the mountains there are wild and bleak. I'd check out Achill too.  You could visit Clare Island and stay overnight.

Take your time, don't try to do too much. We are always amazed at visitors who dash everywhere, from Kerry (incredible admittedly but packed with tourists) and then all the way up to Donegal (also gorgeous and packed with crazy locals).  It's understandable to want to see it all, but I'd suggest to slow down and see what you can take in with a slower pace.  If Mayo is your target, it's a worthy one, drop into a spot or two in Clare and Galway on the way there and back, but settle and spend time in Mayo.  Always found the people there very friendly.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2019, 03:14:42 pm by TommyWeir »
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Lust4Life

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2019, 07:40:52 pm »

Wow Tommy, what a kind gesture your sharing all of that info.
I'll save it and trust your experience.
Thank you Sir!

Jack
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Jack

Cornfield

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2020, 05:53:33 pm »

Ireland is a great country to visit and I'm due a return soon.

True story... I was driving a reomote country area and stopped to ask directions from two olds guys sitting on a bench beside the road.  I asked them for directions to the village of Ballinavar and the reply was "I wouldn't start from here if I was going there".
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tcyin

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Re: travelling to Ireland
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2020, 09:10:18 pm »

Almost 10 years ago we took a 10 day tour of Ireland with a focus on live Irish music in pubs and ancient sites and ruins. We flew to Dublin and headed for Dingle peninsula on the west coast as it is a center for traditional music. Then drove up to Doolin and the cliffs of Moher, Galway and Newgrange, a fantastic Neolithic site near Dublin. Photos and travelogue can be seen at www.neurotraveler.com. Go to the 'pubhopping in Ireland' link. Have a great trip!
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