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Author Topic: Klein & Frank  (Read 558 times)

Rob C

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Telecaster

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2019, 04:50:04 pm »

Really good piece IMO…it features two of my favorite photo books!

Winogrand's quote at the end is pretty devastating. Still relevant too, I think.

-Dave-
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KLaban

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2019, 11:10:33 pm »

Over the years the body of work has struck me as being particularly decisive.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2019, 02:28:34 am by KLaban »
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Rob C

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2019, 06:15:35 am »

Over the years the body of work has struck me as being particularly decisive.

Hard one to argue against, but you know what people are.

;-)

Rob C

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2019, 08:29:16 am »

 http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2013/01/07/timeless-lessons-street-photographers-can-learn-from-robert-franks-the-americans/

You may have reservations about the source, but the article is worth the time - or at least, it did aid me through lunch today.

I thought my fav Frenchman had opened for the season, last Sunday, but imagine my disappointment to discover he was only open for that Sunday, and normal, daily service about to be resumed only from tomorrow. That means that my two usual places are now both in business, with a third, last used about twenty-five years ago, identified for Thursdays, when both the former are closed for resting purposes.

I await Thursday with interest, and hope they have wifi, too; funny how essential that's turned out to be for solitary dining.

And so time passes.

Rob

RSL

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2019, 02:00:04 pm »

Over the years the body of work has struck me as being particularly decisive.

Right, Keith. Frank was as "decisive" a guy as you can find anywhere. As I wrote in "What's Photography Forr":

" Another revolution took place in photography in 1959, when Robert Frank's book: The Americans was published in the United States. I remember the reaction of the photographic community when that book came out. Popular Photography, which in those days actually dealt with photography rather than with equipment, panned the book. The problem was that The Americans dealt with us as we actually were in the fifties – showing "sanitation approved" motels and drugstore diners – rather than with the purified illusions presented by Norman Rockwell's paintings and by photographers such as Alfred Eisenstadt who followed Rockwell's lead. It was a giant flap, but Frank's book became a classic and changed the whole course of street photography."

KLaban

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2019, 07:17:43 am »

Right, Keith. Frank was as "decisive" a guy as you can find anywhere. As I wrote in "What's Photography Forr":

" Another revolution took place in photography in 1959, when Robert Frank's book: The Americans was published in the United States. I remember the reaction of the photographic community when that book came out. Popular Photography, which in those days actually dealt with photography rather than with equipment, panned the book. The problem was that The Americans dealt with us as we actually were in the fifties – showing "sanitation approved" motels and drugstore diners – rather than with the purified illusions presented by Norman Rockwell's paintings and by photographers such as Alfred Eisenstadt who followed Rockwell's lead. It was a giant flap, but Frank's book became a classic and changed the whole course of street photography."

Russ, even when an illustrator the idealised vision of Rockwell and for that matter Vargus was never to my taste.
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Rob C

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2019, 07:48:18 am »

Russ, even when an illustrator the idealised vision of Rockwell and for that matter Vargus was never to my taste.



Oh Keith! Those Vargas ladies were a Playboy staple and favourite, far better than the over-produced centrefolds!

Rob

KLaban

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Re: Klein & Frank
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2019, 08:16:39 am »



Oh Keith! Those Vargas ladies were a Playboy staple and favourite, far better than the over-produced centrefolds!

Rob

But, Rob, I always thought of them as being plastic imitations of the real thing, indeed, much like the centrefolds

Now, Schiele, on the other hand...but he was of course in a different game entirely.
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