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Author Topic: OLED for color accurate workflow?  (Read 247 times)

bwana

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OLED for color accurate workflow?
« on: January 17, 2019, 05:26:57 PM »

Is anyone happy using an OLED screen for their work? I realize the monitors out there now are primarily for consumers (8 bit) but the contrast ratios are amazing - perhaps too good if I want something to show me what my prints will be like. However there are a new crop of OLEDS coming out so who knows. Currently I'm debating between NEC PA271Q-BK or ASUS ProArt PA32UCX(not out yet)
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smthopr

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Re: OLED for color accurate workflow?
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2019, 12:22:31 PM »

Is anyone happy using an OLED screen for their work? I realize the monitors out there now are primarily for consumers (8 bit) but the contrast ratios are amazing - perhaps too good if I want something to show me what my prints will be like. However there are a new crop of OLEDS coming out so who knows. Currently I'm debating between NEC PA271Q-BK or ASUS ProArt PA32UCX(not out yet)

A couple of points:

OLED have such deep blacks and contrast that you will never come close on a paper print.  If making prints is what you are doing, then I don't think it's any advantage.  And most, if not all, have ABL (auto brightness limiting)  which would not be good for calibrating the display with typical tools like the i1 Display Pro and software.  Further, there are perceptual white point issues with OLED where the perceived white color doesn't match the measurement.

Secondly, OLED displays can suffer from burn-in, like Plasma displays.  Probably not such a good technology for still photographs.  It's not so bad with movies as the image constantly changes.
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bwana

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Re: OLED for color accurate workflow?
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2019, 01:17:39 PM »

Thank you.  After more research it seems the uc Version is not really hdr and this one is better and cheaper
https://www.amazon.com/ASUS-PA329Q-3840x2160-ProArt-Monitor/dp/B01F6D1ITM/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1547835282&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=asus+329q&dpPl=1&dpID=51%2BgmChWl2L&ref=plSrch
Plus itís 4k.
The downside tho is that asus qual control is not up to nec standards

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smthopr

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Re: OLED for color accurate workflow?
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2019, 05:29:26 PM »

Thank you.  After more research it seems the uc Version is not really hdr and this one is better and cheaper
https://www.amazon.com/ASUS-PA329Q-3840x2160-ProArt-Monitor/dp/B01F6D1ITM/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1547835282&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=asus+329q&dpPl=1&dpID=51%2BgmChWl2L&ref=plSrch
Plus itís 4k.
The downside tho is that asus qual control is not up to nec standards

What kind of work will you be doing with this display?

And, HDR doesn't have any application for photographic prints as well.  At the present time HDR displays are in their infancy for video/motion pictures and are not well standardized.  I haven't heard of any system for tagging still photographs for proper HDR display yet.  And I don't think the .icc specs account for HDR displays at all.

"HDR" for displays is a different concept than what, in still photography, has been referred to as "HDR".  Both stand for "high dynamic range", but HDR displays are capable of very high brightness and very high contrast ratios.  The idea being to reproduce scenes closer to the actual "real life" representation.

Where as "HDR" for photography refers to capturing very high contrast scenes to preserve details, but usually for compressing the dynamic range into a more "standard" contrast ratio for display, either electronic or print.  So they are related, but two different concepts.
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