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Author Topic: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?  (Read 498 times)

John Hollenberg

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How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« on: December 31, 2018, 03:16:17 PM »

I'm not aware of any color casts from my sony A7r2 or Canon 5DSr but perhaps I haven't looked closely.  Is Color Cast removal generally considered useful for landscape images or just in some particular settings like snow? Does the "Enable Uniform Light" setting work better than just adjusting vignetting with a slider? Do landscape shooters routinely use LCC with full frame cameras?

Thanks for any input.

John
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Paul2660

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Re: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2018, 03:47:50 PM »

Itís not as important for color cast in a 35mm system since you are using a mirror box and lens is further away from the sensor.

Itís a great advantage for light fall off for a shift lens.

I use the Nikon 19mm and it has considerable light fall off at 12mm and 10mm of shift. It also slightly vignettes at 12mm. With C1 and a few LCC frames all of this can be corrected. You really only need 1 or 2 reference frames as color cast is not a big issue.

I only wish C1 would develop a lens profile for the 19mm.

Paul C

« Last Edit: December 31, 2018, 04:36:57 PM by Paul2660 »
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Paul Caldwell
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E.J. Peiker

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Re: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2018, 04:21:36 PM »

It depends a lot on the lens in use.  For example on the Sony a7 series, the Voigtlander 10 and 12mm lenses benefit greatly both in light fall-off and color cast in the corner.  Generally the wider the lens, the more benefit you'll get from an LCC.  On your system, the Irix 11mm benefits greatly from an LCC as another example.
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John Hollenberg

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Re: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2018, 04:48:05 PM »

It depends a lot on the lens in use.  For example on the Sony a7 series, the Voigtlander 10 and 12mm lenses benefit greatly both in light fall-off and color cast in the corner.  Generally the wider the lens, the more benefit you'll get from an LCC.  On your system, the Irix 11mm benefits greatly from an LCC as another example.

Widest lens I have currently is Canon 16-35 mm f4.  I am not a big wide angle shooter, although I did use it when I went to Bears Ears national monument and hiked in to see and photograph some ruins.
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E.J. Peiker

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Re: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2018, 07:30:22 PM »

I wouldn't worry about it on a lens that has a good lens profile already built into C1.
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BartvanderWolf

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Re: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2018, 09:09:26 PM »

I wouldn't worry about it on a lens that has a good lens profile already built into C1.

Hi,

I'm not so sure that/whether Lens Profiles also cover Lens/Sensor Casts. These are potentially quite different per camera/sensor design, so a generic lens profile isn't likely to cover all use-cases.

Generic Light Fall-off or Vignetting correction might be (but I've not specifically tested for that). However, a dedicated LCC will cover for the specific application (lens/settings/camera) deviations.

One of the reasons that I mention this is my experience with a(n admittedly but yet practical extreme) Canon EF 85mm F1.2L USM lens on an EOS-1Ds Mark-3 body. The exit pupil of that specific lens is so wide, that the Camera's mirror (in the Up-position) casts a slight shadow at the f/1.2 setting, resulting in asymmetrical OOF blur patterns. I sent in the lens for a decentering correction, but the lens was returned with an 'within spec' qualification (which made sense for apertures from f/1.8 and narrower). Lesson learned.

How this affects Lens Color Cast, is another issue, but most likely also very camera+sensor dependent.

Cheers,
Bart
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E.J. Peiker

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Re: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2019, 09:23:33 AM »

Hi,

I'm not so sure that/whether Lens Profiles also cover Lens/Sensor Casts. These are potentially quite different per camera/sensor design, so a generic lens profile isn't likely to cover all use-cases.

Generic Light Fall-off or Vignetting correction might be (but I've not specifically tested for that). However, a dedicated LCC will cover for the specific application (lens/settings/camera) deviations.

One of the reasons that I mention this is my experience with a(n admittedly but yet practical extreme) Canon EF 85mm F1.2L USM lens on an EOS-1Ds Mark-3 body. The exit pupil of that specific lens is so wide, that the Camera's mirror (in the Up-position) casts a slight shadow at the f/1.2 setting, resulting in asymmetrical OOF blur patterns. I sent in the lens for a decentering correction, but the lens was returned with an 'within spec' qualification (which made sense for apertures from f/1.8 and narrower). Lesson learned.

How this affects Lens Color Cast, is another issue, but most likely also very camera+sensor dependent.

Cheers,
Bart
Yeah I totally agree with that but the lens in question, the canon 16-35 f/4 hasn't shown itself to have any color cast issues in my experience.
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BartvanderWolf

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Re: How Useful is LCC for Landscape Images?
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2019, 03:10:40 PM »

Yeah I totally agree with that but the lens in question, the canon 16-35 f/4 hasn't shown itself to have any color cast issues in my experience.

That figures, that lens would have a Retro-focus lens design, hence is less likely to cause Color Casts. The more oblique the rays fall on a sensor, the more likely the Color Casts will occur.

Cheers,
Bart
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