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Author Topic: Ansel Adams and Shadows  (Read 2813 times)

Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #40 on: January 06, 2019, 02:13:34 pm »

I just went on google and this is where we had lunch. There was a print of Moonrise in the wall, I mentioned it to my wife and the nice elderly lady behind the counter (who I assumed was the owner) told us it was by that gas station. More than likely the easiest landmark for a tourist. :)             

Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #41 on: January 06, 2019, 02:26:04 pm »

Sorry for the bumps. When we were by that church a fellow with a cowboy hat, in a flatbed with hay bails and a couple of dogs pulled up. I had my camera out and he said "you lookin for Ansel ese". He told us his grandfather owned all the land in that area but had to sell a lot of it off. Now there are trailer homes between the church and the main highway. Well they were there in 2015. We told him we were staying in Santa Fe and he asked if were from there and we said no, Canada. That blew him away. He couldn't believe it.                           

drralph

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #42 on: January 06, 2019, 10:07:56 pm »

Yes, that is the San Jose Mission, taken from the front on Route 1.  Ansel's image was taken from the shoulder of the main road, US 285, and shows the back of the church.  I matched up the contours of the mountains in the background to verify.  Looking at the church from the front, you can see the graveyard to the left rear.  Brings to mind the Buddhist precept, things change.

Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #43 on: January 07, 2019, 11:23:27 am »

Cool. Thanks.

bwana

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #44 on: January 08, 2019, 04:17:06 pm »

There are many video interviews with or about Adams that show how is style changed over the years.  The classic and most documented example (that I know of) is "Moonrise over Hernandez", which over the years he printed increasingly more contrasty. So dark shadows/light shadows (among many other aesthetic decisions) is really just a part of an artist's preference at any particular time.

Truly. I dont remember where, but I saw one of his earlier prints of this negative - much lighter and less contrasty. Almost boring to look at. His use of dodging and burning along with cutting out masks was unique for the time. Making the print was an exercise in so much creativity. I wonder what he'd be doing if he were alive today? Would he be pushing photoshop sliders all over the place? Would he be making neon surreal HDRs?
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Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #45 on: January 09, 2019, 12:48:08 pm »

His critics said that even with his elaborate zone system to create the negative he still had to dodge and burn. I remember those days and eventually losing my patience with everything. :)

As for these days he more than likely would have created excellent work in the digital darkroom (if he didn't stick to film) but he would not be a household name. Remember the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie. “You are without a doubt the worst pirate I’ve ever heard of.” (James Norrington) “But you have heard of me.” – Jack Sparrow.

drralph

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #46 on: January 09, 2019, 02:14:18 pm »

Ansel had so many of the key attributes:  technical chops, aesthetic taste, boundless energy.  These days, there seem to be many people out there with those qualities.  The difference is he did it first, and he used the tools available at the time in a way no one else had before.

Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #47 on: January 09, 2019, 11:28:54 pm »

Ansel had so many of the key attributes:  technical chops, aesthetic taste, boundless energy.  These days, there seem to be many people out there with those qualities.  The difference is he did it first, and he used the tools available at the time in a way no one else had before.

Exactly

Alan Goldhammer

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2019, 08:10:24 am »

Ansel had so many of the key attributes:  technical chops, aesthetic taste, boundless energy.  These days, there seem to be many people out there with those qualities.  The difference is he did it first, and he used the tools available at the time in a way no one else had before.
I would add to this incredible patience.  A lot of research was still going on in the photo-chemistry area regarding both film and paper developing agents.  Adams Zone system addressed a number of limitations but even so the he had to figure out film exposure and development times and follow that with the same approach to the photographic enlargement.
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Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #49 on: January 11, 2019, 12:18:40 pm »

I would add to this incredible patience.  A lot of research was still going on in the photo-chemistry area regarding both film and paper developing agents.  Adams Zone system addressed a number of limitations but even so the he had to figure out film exposure and development times and follow that with the same approach to the photographic enlargement.

I really tried to do all of that but eventually it was just too much. I back your statement about his patience. 

luxborealis

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #50 on: January 11, 2019, 07:42:44 pm »

His critics said that even with his elaborate zone system to create the negative he still had to dodge and burn. I remember those days and eventually losing my patience with everything. :)

The “critics” who purportedly said this, have no concept of the process of photography, making them not critics, but blow-hards. Proponents of the Zone System never claim that it would do away with having to dodge and burn. The Zone System is for ‘global’ adjustment of overall contrast. Dodging and burning are for local alterations. Even a ‘perfect’ negative or digital file benefits from at least some burning and dodging, if only to shape the lighting for subtle emphasis or de-emphasis.
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Terry McDonald - luxBorealis.com

Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2019, 08:01:09 pm »

The “critics” who purportedly said this, have no concept of the process of photography, making them not critics, but blow-hards. Proponents of the Zone System never claim that it would do away with having to dodge and burn. The Zone System is for ‘global’ adjustment of overall contrast. Dodging and burning are for local alterations. Even a ‘perfect’ negative or digital file benefits from at least some burning and dodging, if only to shape the lighting for subtle emphasis or de-emphasis.

I like your perspective. I only gave up because it took time to master it and got pretty costly. I'm glad I went through the whole experience. 

Martin Kristiansen

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2019, 10:45:38 pm »

The “critics” who purportedly said this, have no concept of the process of photography, making them not critics, but blow-hards. Proponents of the Zone System never claim that it would do away with having to dodge and burn. The Zone System is for ‘global’ adjustment of overall contrast. Dodging and burning are for local alterations. Even a ‘perfect’ negative or digital file benefits from at least some burning and dodging, if only to shape the lighting for subtle emphasis or de-emphasis.

Absolutely. Surprised anyone ever thought otherwise.

 Slight burning in on the corners to stop the eye wondering out the frame. A little holding back on a silvery river to make it pop a bit more. A light holding back on dark hair to show a bit more detail. Burning in a stubborn sky. Part of the process.
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Zen8

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Re: Ansel Adams and Shadows
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2019, 11:21:34 pm »

Absolutely. Surprised anyone ever thought otherwise.

 Slight burning in on the corners to stop the eye wondering out the frame. A little holding back on a silvery river to make it pop a bit more. A light holding back on dark hair to show a bit more detail. Burning in a stubborn sky. Part of the process.

Only the jealous and others who didn't want to learn and put the time in. I built my own vacuum tables. Picked up an old vacuum cleaner for about $5. I still have it and use it in the shop for small dust pick up.  :)       
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