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Author Topic: Landscape article - Peter Eastway  (Read 6668 times)

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #80 on: November 21, 2018, 05:50:38 pm »

Can someone point out which of the images that illustrate the OP article are "fabricated" and in which way?

Bumping this question up, since no one bothered to explain, while we keep vehemently arguing against “fabricated” landscapes.

Dave (Isle of Skye)

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #81 on: November 21, 2018, 06:04:37 pm »

Bumping this question up, since no one bothered to explain, while we keep vehemently arguing against “fabricated” landscapes.

I think we are discussing the topic of the article, as the writer has explained it. In other words, he is discussing the images he has shown to us in this piece and how they may not represent reality. So without trying to point a finger at any given image, the fact that he raises this point himself and then I assume tries to illustrate it with these images, must mean that even he knows some of them or fake.

But I know what you mean Slobodan, that you want someone to take up the challenge and actually point to one of the images  ;)

Dave
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Dave (Isle of Skye)

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #82 on: November 22, 2018, 05:30:46 am »

I have just re-read my posts on this topic on a beautiful morning on the Isle of Skye, and I seem to be coming across as a really miserable grumpy old man, with a massive chip on both of my shoulders, and which I suppose I am at the moment, as I seem to be suffering from some sort of post fantastic photographic holiday depression type of thing.  :(

So I ask everyone's forgiveness for my various rants and I apologise profusely and will now try to stay well clear of any heated types of discussion, until my emotions settle back down once again and normal service resumes...

thanks

Dave
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KLaban

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #83 on: November 22, 2018, 06:18:12 am »

I have just re-read my posts on this topic on a beautiful morning on the Isle of Skye, and I seem to be coming across as a really miserable grumpy old man, with a massive chip on both of my shoulders, and which I suppose I am at the moment, as I seem to be suffering from some sort of post fantastic photographic holiday depression type of thing.  :(

So I ask everyone's forgiveness for my various rants and I apologise profusely and will now try to stay well clear of any heated types of discussion, until my emotions settle back down once again and normal service resumes...

thanks

Dave

^

Well, isn't that rather refreshing?
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32BT

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #84 on: November 22, 2018, 07:57:03 am »

^

Well, isn't that rather refreshing?

If it came from someone who actually needed to apologize, then yes, but i don't recall ever having seen Dave swirling over some imaginary bounds of morality in these parts. Or is he really apologizing to other grumpy old men that he may have behaved like one as well?

His only apology i will accept is a post with more of his images. ;-)
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Mark D Segal

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #85 on: November 22, 2018, 09:20:49 am »

Ya, what's he got to apologize for? Nothing he said falls outside the bounds of civilized debate as far as I can tell. It's a fascinating topic about a very old issue - I remember debating a subject very similar to this over 50 years ago in the context of the question of the day back then, "is photography art?" and the perspectives were no less varied! Especially discussing it with (paint) artists!
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #86 on: November 22, 2018, 09:22:53 am »

Mood swings, Dave? 😉

Or you just suffer from the Stendhal syndrome?

Mark D Segal

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #87 on: November 22, 2018, 09:38:28 am »

Mood swings, Dave? 😉

Or you just suffer from the Stendhal syndrome?

Well, never heard that one before - one learns something new all the time, so for those others who may be in the same boat, here's what I found on Google:

"Stendhal syndrome, Stendhal's syndrome, hyperkulturemia, or Florence syndrome is a psychosomatic disorder that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to an experience of great personal significance, particularly viewing art."

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rabanito

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #88 on: November 22, 2018, 09:53:55 am »

Mood swings, Dave? 😉

Or you just suffer from the Stendhal syndrome?

Im learning some Kultur as well as Photography.
Every 100 words I have to google one :-)
Just joking
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KLaban

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #89 on: November 22, 2018, 09:55:39 am »

If it came from someone who actually needed to apologize, then yes, but i don't recall ever having seen Dave swirling over some imaginary bounds of morality in these parts. Or is he really apologizing to other grumpy old men that he may have behaved like one as well?

His only apology i will accept is a post with more of his images. ;-)

I'm not sure I need to apologise, but being an admirer of Dave and following his honourable example I'm going to anyway, just in case.

I'm sorry.

;-)
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Dale Villeponteaux

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #90 on: November 22, 2018, 10:22:27 am »

I've had trouble following this thread in that I don't know what reality is. My senses give me a version of reality refined over eons to be useful to survival, but that is only an abstraction of reality. For instance, I have no direct perception of electrons but electrons and their orbits define chemistry which defines our very being, including thought processes. I think thoughts (pace!) are real since they can effect changes in the external world but they too are abstractions.

So there is a representation of reality provided by my senses, another provided by thoughts and imagination, another by photons impinging on a sensor other than my retina and on and on.

Which representation is more real? I suppose I could choose the one from my senses, since I share that with other human but that would only be a convention.

I apologize for being sentitious; I was up very late.

Regards,
Dale







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KLaban

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #91 on: November 22, 2018, 11:10:29 am »

Well, never heard that one before - one learns something new all the time, so for those others who may be in the same boat, here's what I found on Google:

"Stendhal syndrome, Stendhal's syndrome, hyperkulturemia, or Florence syndrome is a psychosomatic disorder that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to an experience of great personal significance, particularly viewing art."

Do tears count?
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LesPalenik

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #92 on: November 22, 2018, 02:55:01 pm »

Well, never heard that one before - one learns something new all the time, so for those others who may be in the same boat, here's what I found on Google:

"Stendhal syndrome, Stendhal's syndrome, hyperkulturemia, or Florence syndrome is a psychosomatic disorder that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to an experience of great personal significance, particularly viewing art."

I also experienced some of those feelings after being exposed to an experience of great personal significance, particularly when viewing and touching a lovely piece of art. 

faberryman

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #93 on: November 22, 2018, 02:59:50 pm »

I doubt even Stendhal suffered from Stendhal syndrome.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #94 on: November 22, 2018, 03:08:11 pm »

I doubt even Stendhal suffered from Stendhal syndrome.

Further from Wikipedia, for doubters:

Quote
The illness is named after the 19th-century French author Stendhal (pseudonym of Marie-Henri Beyle), who described his experience with the phenomenon during his 1817 visit to Florence in his book Naples and Florence: A Journey from Milan to Reggio.

When he visited the Basilica of Santa Croce, where Niccolò Machiavelli, Michelangelo and Galileo Galilei are buried, he was overcome with emotion. He wrote:

I was in a sort of ecstasy, from the idea of being in Florence, close to the great men whose tombs I had seen. Absorbed in the contemplation of sublime beauty ... I reached the point where one encounters celestial sensations ... Everything spoke so vividly to my soul. Ah, if I could only forget. I had palpitations of the heart, what in Berlin they call 'nerves'. Life was drained from me. I walked with the fear of falling.[2]

He had been shown the frescoes in the church including those by Giotto, and modern writers frequently attribute his emotions mistakenly to the latter rather than powerful historical associations of the tombs.[citation needed]

Although psychiatrists have long debated whether it really exists, its effects on some sufferers are serious enough for them to require treatment in hospital.[3] The staff at Florence's Santa Maria Nuova hospital are accustomed to dealing with tourists suffering from dizzy spells and disorientation after admiring the statue of David, the masterpieces of the Uffizi Gallery and other treasures of the Tuscan city.[4]

Even though there are many descriptions of people becoming dizzy and fainting while taking in Florentine art, especially at the aforementioned Uffizi in Florence, dating from the early 19th century on, the syndrome was only named in 1979, when it was described by Italian psychiatrist Graziella Magherini, who observed and described more than 100 similar cases among tourists and visitors in Florence. There is no scientific evidence to define the Stendhal syndrome as a specific psychiatric disorder; on the other hand there is evidence that the same cerebral areas involved in emotional reactions are activated during the exposure to artworks.[5]

faberryman

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #95 on: November 22, 2018, 03:17:20 pm »

You forgot to quote this part:

Quote
It is not listed as a recognised condition in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

It is a creation of the Romantics. Think Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2018, 03:49:27 pm by faberryman »
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Mark D Segal

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #96 on: November 22, 2018, 03:30:56 pm »

You forgot to quote this part:
It is not listed as a recognised condition in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

It is a creation of the Romantics.

If you had read "The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump" (27 psychiatrists and mental health experts; ed. Bandy Lee, St. Martin's Press 2017) you would have come across the point made more than once that there deficiencies and inadequacies in that manual, so just because it isn't listed there perhaps doesn't necessarily mean much, but this isn't my field so I'll leave it at that.
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LesPalenik

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #97 on: November 22, 2018, 07:05:30 pm »

Stendhal syndrom for witnessing great visual art and Beatlemania for music. And some men act irrationally in the presence of beautiful women.

Quote
Take one 2001 study by researchers Anne Blood and Robert Zatorre at McGill University. They recruited ten individuals who had at least some formal music training. Each participant selected a song that, they claimed, gave them (good) chills. The researchers played a 90-second excerpt of their chosen song while the subject laid in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine, a device that measures brain activity by detecting changes in blood flow. Compared to control (neutral) sounds, music that elicits physical and emotional changes activated limbic, paralimbic, and midbrain regions. And these areas are implicated in pleasure and reward, not unlike the neural pathways that recognise yummy food, addictive drugs, and sex.

https://www.businessinsider.com/science-explains-why-girls-went-so-crazy-for-the-beatles-2014-2

rabanito

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #98 on: November 23, 2018, 07:05:41 pm »

Stendhal syndrom for witnessing great visual art

I never faint when opening my photoboxes so I assume that I don't suffer from Stendahl's Syndrome...or rather my pics are not that great.

Maybe both propositions are true :-(
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Rand47

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Re: Landscape article - Peter Eastway
« Reply #99 on: November 23, 2018, 11:16:31 pm »

I've had trouble following this thread in that I don't know what reality is. My senses give me a version of reality refined over eons to be useful to survival, but that is only an abstraction of reality. For instance, I have no direct perception of electrons but electrons and their orbits define chemistry which defines our very being, including thought processes. I think thoughts (pace!) are real since they can effect changes in the external world but they too are abstractions.

So there is a representation of reality provided by my senses, another provided by thoughts and imagination, another by photons impinging on a sensor other than my retina and on and on.

Which representation is more real? I suppose I could choose the one from my senses, since I share that with other human but that would only be a convention.

I apologize for being sentitious; I was up very late.

Regards,
Dale

I appreciate the clarity of your contribution.  But it makes me wonder why you bother to photograph anything at all?  If it is for your own pleasure only, you can’t assume that the image you are viewing represents anything other than a “possible” representation of sensory input.  And if photographing for others, that “anything you have to say” in your work has any relevance to others, at all.

This is, in part, the pain of modern man, stripped of any notion of objective reality.
Rand
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