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Author Topic: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.  (Read 564 times)

smikkelmit22

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Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« on: August 10, 2018, 10:42:31 AM »

Hi,

I'm trying to learn more about types of canvas media.

There are three major types: polycotton, cotton and poly.

Poly is most of the time cheapest.
Polycotton most of the time midrange.
Cotton canvas most of the time the most expensive.

Does anyone know the differences between the types, expect the difference in price? I also learned that how the product is woven is very important.

1:1 woven cracks fast
2:1 woven is the higher quality.

If anybody knows something about canvas media, please post is here :D
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I.T. Supplies

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Re: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2018, 10:51:26 AM »

Poly/Cotton blend is the most popular type and most of the brands carry that version.
Polyester is not as common, but a few brands will make it and Cotton is pretty rare since it's not really available much.

So, it really depends on what you're using it for to make sure you get the right type.  Most of the brands that we carry (about 7 or so) will have the poly/cotton blend.  Our house brand has both poly/cotton and poly.  I believe Hahnemuhle or Moab has a cotton version, but it's one where you may need to order it and the manufacturer "may" have it available upfront or will take some time to get it in.

Feel free to contact us if you'd like more information about these versions and we can also let you know about the price difference.
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mearussi

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Re: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2018, 12:58:44 PM »

Cotton/poly is the most common. The reason I've heard from manufacturers is that it is the best compromise between durability, lack of shrinkage and flexibility. 100% cotton is usually more flexible and easier to stretch but at the expense of possibly having to restretch it again later.

Besides composition, the other variables are thickness, surface texture and whether it contains OBAs.

From what I gather from the various printing forums, the most commonly used canvas is Breathing Color's Lyve (no OBAs). It is a matte canvas that offers a good combination of price, a relatively smooth texture, and a high quality image. It is also one of the few canvases that can be used with either PK or MK ink and still look good (I use it with PK). Both B&H and Adorama carry it.

The smoothest surface is provided by Canson's Museum ProCanvas, which is 100% cotton and OBA free. It comes in either matte or satin and is very soft and easy to stretch. It is carried by I.T. Supplies and Adorama.

 The canvas with the whitest background (without OBAs) is Premier Art's Museum Bright Satin canvas:
http://www.premierimagingproducts.com/museum-bright-satin-canvas/

Supposedly the whiter the coating the better the colors, but I haven't seen much difference compared to either Lyve or Museum ProCanvas. It's also slightly more expensive than the others. This canvas is available from I.T Supplies but I'm not sure if B&H or Adorama carry it.

All canvas (and paper for that matter) should be coated, even those that say you don't really need to. This is because the microporous inkjet coating has lots of tiny holes in it so the ink can be absorbed. But those holes need to be plugged once printing is done to keep air pollutants from attacking the ink. Paper prints framed behind glass are for the most part protected by the glass, but any print exposed to the air, like canvas, needs to be protected.

Stretching is the final component to consider. You can either stretch it the conventional way using standard stretcher bars and pliers or you can use a kit.
I opted for the kit as it's just easier to get good results (once you've figured out what you're doing). GoFrame in Canada makes all the kits sold in the U.S. that I.T. Supplies, Breathing Color and Lexjet resale under their own store brand. There are two lines, the thin and cheaper amateur line and the thicker pro line. Unless you only want to frame a small canvas stick with the pro line as the cheaper line will warp past 11x14.
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DougDolde

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Re: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2018, 05:36:03 PM »


Stretching is the final component to consider. You can either stretch it the conventional way using standard stretcher bars and pliers or you can use a kit.
I opted for the kit as it's just easier to get good results (once you've figured out what you're doing). GoFrame in Canada makes all the kits sold in the U.S. that I.T. Supplies, Breathing Color and Lexjet resale under their own store brand. There are two lines, the thin and cheaper amateur line and the thicker pro line. Unless you only want to frame a small canvas stick with the pro line as the cheaper line will warp past 11x14.

I don't like those kits and use stretcher bars from Dick Blick.  I don't use pliers, just pull tight by hand then when it's done I drive eight keys into the corner slots to make it tight as a drum.   But get an air stapler.  You will need a compressor but an air stapler is far better than a hand or electric one. 
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smikkelmit22

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Re: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2018, 03:28:19 PM »

Thanks for all the responses.

Things are a bit more clear now.

In my experience there is a lot of poly canvas on the market. Most of the time very cheap and thin.  Not something that looks nice.
If you order a 'photo to canvas' product, they most of the time use this cheap material.

I personally prefer 330gsm cotton.

What exactly does 330gsm means? is it that is weigths 330G for each m2 ?
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mearussi

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Re: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2018, 06:46:22 PM »

Thanks for all the responses.

Things are a bit more clear now.

In my experience there is a lot of poly canvas on the market. Most of the time very cheap and thin.  Not something that looks nice.
If you order a 'photo to canvas' product, they most of the time use this cheap material.

I personally prefer 330gsm cotton.

What exactly does 330gsm means? is it that is weigths 330G for each m2 ?
Yes. If you're wanting 100% cotton then go with the Canson I mentioned above. It's 385gsm but is very soft and flexible and easy to stretch. http://www.canson-infinity.com/en/products/museum-pro-canvas
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enduser

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Re: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2018, 10:02:20 PM »

Polyester canvas seems very resistant to getting crease marks.
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William Chitham

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Re: Canvas. That's best and why: Polycotton, cotton or poly.
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2018, 09:27:05 AM »

Don't think anyone has mentioned opacity. I've always used heavy cotton canvasses in the past but am currently printing a job on an Innova branded 260gsm Polyester. It prints well (z3200), texture is unobtrusive, stretches easily but it is not very opaque. Stretched on an open frame and hung on anything other than a white wall and you'll definitely see some colout/tonal shift.

William.
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