Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Large-format cold laminating service in the greater New York City area?  (Read 533 times)

Terry_Kennedy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20

This is kind of an oddball question - does anyone here know of any [relatively] inexpensive large-format (up to 44") cold laminating services in the greater New York City area? I'm printing some vinyl banners on Eagle Scrim from Walker Supply (spec sheet) on my P10000 and I sent the customer a sample print complete with grommets and reinforcing tape, and they were happy except that they said the surface was easily damaged. I'm not sure I agree with that, but "the customer is always right", so I'm looking to have their prints laminated. The prints are on 24", 36" and 44" wide media and are up to 12 feet long. The spec sheet for the media says cold lamination only.

Everyone in NYC that I've contacted either wants to print and laminate or wants to charge an (IMHO) excessive amount of money for the job - basically, they want to treat me as a retail customer. Does anyone have any suggestions for a shop I should work with? It could be outside of NYC - Northern NJ, CT, etc.
Logged

BrianBeauban

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Large-format cold laminating service in the greater New York City area?
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2018, 09:21:40 AM »

I doubt anyone would run those through a laminator with the grommets in, that would tear up the rollers. They need to pull out the grommets and remove the tape. It won't be cheap. Most larger sign shops that provide similar services might be willing to look at it but if it were my shop I'd rather start from scratch. However, if you can find someone to mop on some aqueous coating that would be the least expensive route. Call Marabu Coatings and ask if they can guise you to any customers in NY who might be able to help.

https://www.marabu-northamerica.com/
Logged

Ken Doo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1032
    • Carmel Fine Art Printing & Reproduction
Re: Large-format cold laminating service in the greater New York City area?
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2018, 09:30:30 AM »

Try hvlp spray coating.

I've had very good luck using canvas, hvlp spray coated, for outside banners. These hold up very well to the weather and wind.

Terry_Kennedy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20
Re: Large-format cold laminating service in the greater New York City area?
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2018, 04:19:25 PM »

I doubt anyone would run those through a laminator with the grommets in, that would tear up the rollers. They need to pull out the grommets and remove the tape.

You misunderstood me. I'm not looking to have the sample (that I ran previously and sent to the customer as a proof) laminated, I want to run off new pieces and have them laminated. I'll then apply the reinforcing tape and grommets back at my shop.

Quote
It won't be cheap. Most larger sign shops that provide similar services might be willing to look at it but if it were my shop I'd rather start from scratch. However, if you can find someone to mop on some aqueous coating that would be the least expensive route. Call Marabu Coatings and ask if they can guise you to any customers in NY who might be able to help.

That is exactly the problem - "it won't be cheap". I could buy a 55" Daige cold laminator and the material for less than what people have been quoting me. If I have to do that, I will, but it seems silly. I don't know whatever happened to the spirit of "we can't do this, but here's the name of somebody who can" in NYC in the typesetting / printing world in the 80's (and into the 90's and beyond, when cold type died as a separate industry).
Logged

Terry_Kennedy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20
Re: Large-format cold laminating service in the greater New York City area?
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2018, 09:38:31 PM »

That is exactly the problem - "it won't be cheap". I could buy a 55" Daige cold laminator and the material for less than what people have been quoting me. If I have to do that, I will, but it seems silly. I don't know whatever happened to the spirit of "we can't do this, but here's the name of somebody who can" in NYC in the typesetting / printing world in the 80's (and into the 90's and beyond, when cold type died as a separate industry).

After posting the above, I sent out inquiries to 12 additional companies that listed both laminating and large-format print services on their web sites. I received 2 "we can't handle that size", 1 more quote for $1250 (the lowest quote I received) and a request for a sample print if I wanted to proceed to make sure they could do it. I received no response from the other 10, even after follow-ups.

Marabu sent me a sample quart of their ClearShield Classic Gloss which I rolled onto a 12" x 24" test print using their suggested (via email - their web site lacks details) roller brand and application method. I wasn't too happy with the result (severe orange peel), but laminated the smallest full-size print, 44" x 50", to see how it looked. It also had the same orange peel effect. Marabu suggested using more product to achieve self-leveling, but having used nearly half a quart between the 2 test prints, I didn't want to buy a quart or two more to do further testing with, not to mention the extended drying time a thicker coat would require.

I was communicating with Marabu about using Classic Lite Semi-Gloss in a HVLP spay application, but they stopped responding after an email saying they were evacuating due to the hurricane. That was the last I heard from them - I hope their people are all OK.

I decided to purchase a gallon of the Classic Lite Semi-Gloss and go right into spraying, since the deadline for this job was coming up and the prints have been hanging around here for over a month and a half at this point. I was quite pleased with the results from spraying the 44" x 50" print (the smallest of the batch) in my impromptu garage-based spray booth. The Semi-Gloss produces a surface texture very similar to the look of Epson Premium Lustre 260 when sprayed with my equipment. All of the prints including the largest 44" x 122" one have been sprayed and are curing. Over the next few days after they've each had a week to fully set, I'll add the reinforcing tape, tabs and grommets and send them to my customer. The customer has already approved the high-res photographs I took of the coated material from various angles.

Thanks for the pointer to the Marabu coatings!

Note: Marabu gives a shelf life of one year from the date of manufacture for unopened properly stored coating containers (this seems to be standard, based on some other brands I looked at). There is seriously out-of-date material in the distribution channel - one distributor listed on the Marabu web site (no need to name names) sent me material which had been expired for 17 months, meaning it was manufactured 29 months ago. When I called them about this, they said they had a hard time understanding this as they "move an awful lot of that product". I sent them photographs of the dust-covered jug. Apparently they don't perform stock rotation and the stuff on the back of the shelf just sits there and ages out. Marabu date codes are BBBMDDYY, where BBB is a batch number, M is the month from A-L, and DDYY is self-explanatory.
Logged

MichaelEzra

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1027
    • https://www.michaelezra.com
Re: Large-format cold laminating service in the greater New York City area?
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2018, 07:10:01 AM »

Hi Terry, I have a 53" cold laminator, you are welcome to use it.
Logged

aaronchan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 560
Re: Large-format cold laminating service in the greater New York City area?
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2018, 12:46:24 AM »

Does it have to be liquid lamination? It is easy to do cold lamination by yourself with the right equipment. A cold laminator is not that expensive anymore.

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com.hk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F173543177993

Yes, it is not by Seal but it will do the job.
With such a machine, you can now start to lamination and mounting business as well

Aaron


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Pages: [1]   Go Up