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Author Topic: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?  (Read 815 times)

BJL

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35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« on: June 14, 2018, 04:27:20 AM »

Some recent 35mm film camera news.

Firstly, Canon has officially announced the discontinuation of its last film camera, the EOS-1V, though that is probably emptying the warehouse of a product last manufactured about eight years ago. The Nikon F6 persists in the same “out of production but still in stock” state.

That brings us to Leica, which is still manufacturing film cameras. It just announced the end of production of the M7 (which is rather battery dependent due to its motorised electronically controlled shutter, and heretically, has an AE mode), so the last survivors are the MP and MA, with purely manual and mechanical operation. (The MP uses a battery only for its light meter; the MA has no battery, as it has no light meter.)
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 04:41:52 AM by BJL »
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NancyP

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2018, 11:11:12 AM »

On the other hand, there are zillions of old film cameras out there. The film enthusiast's real worry is the disappearance of FILM.
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BernardLanguillier

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2018, 06:09:54 PM »

The older the camera the more future proof it probably is... ;)

Same with cars btw.

Cheers,
Bernard

hogloff

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2018, 06:40:05 PM »

On the other hand, there are zillions of old film cameras out there. The film enthusiast's real worry is the disappearance of FILM.

In actual fact some older films have started up in production again. There is a somewhat resurgence in film photography.
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Telecaster

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2018, 07:23:41 PM »

In actual fact some older films have started up in production again. There is a somewhat resurgence in film photography.

Yep. OTOH Fuji seems to be letting its film biz slowly bleed out. But I do intend to give the new Ektachrome a spin once it's available in quantity.

-Dave-
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BJL

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2018, 03:18:42 AM »

The older the camera the more future proof it probably is... ;)

Same with cars btw.
Same with film too maybe: black and white that is simpler to make, and to develop and print at home, might be the last holdout.

I was puzzled by how quickly the mainstream priced film SLRs were all discontinued, but I guess it is the abundance of good used gear being preferred to cheap new options like the Nikon FM10, for a mix of price, robustness and coolness.
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Vieri Bottazzini

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2018, 03:48:30 AM »

Same with film too maybe: black and white that is simpler to make, and to develop and print at home, might be the last holdout.

I was puzzled by how quickly the mainstream priced film SLRs were all discontinued, but I guess it is the abundance of good used gear being preferred to cheap new options like the Nikon FM10, for a mix of price, robustness and coolness.

I think you have a good point about B&W film, the fact that is developable at home is a major plus to keep it alive - very few labs can afford to keep a colour film developing line open, with the volumes they get these days, and developing colour film at home - while possible - is a pain in that you need to group a lot of film and run batches quickly to avoid depletion of chemicals.

I also think that you might be right about discontinuing mainstream pieced film cameras; while keeping at least one top of the line camera was both prestige and, perhaps, brought in a few sales, mainstream cameras simply film died with digital first and smartphones after. And, if one wants to experiment with film, one can find not just mainstream priced cameras, but top of the line film gear, for very very reasonable prices these days (see i.e. Hasselblad 500 lines of cameras and lenses)

Best regards,

Vieri
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Vieri Bottazzini
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Two23

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2018, 07:11:52 PM »

On the other hand, there are zillions of old film cameras out there. The film enthusiast's real worry is the disappearance of FILM.


It's looking like film will be around longer than I'll be alive.  And even if it's not, I've started shooting dry plates! :)  I can make those myself.



Kent in SD
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Bo_Dez

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2018, 04:21:30 AM »

Film is doing very well.

Leica are still producing film cameras which are selling successfully. But what is the point of Leica having 3 film camera lines?

Medium Format film is doing exceptionally well at the moment. Look at the prices of these second hand cameras these days, it has gone crazy.

There aren't many buying Canon EOS 1v's though. What a butt ugly camera it is too!

I think the Nikon F6 is still in production.
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fredjeang2

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Re: 35mm film cameras: down to all-mechanical Leica’s?
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2018, 10:45:32 AM »

Film is doing very well.

It does.
The denand increased clearly, so the prices.
To the point that in some cases it became speculative.
I do notice too a bigger interest for MF.
The demand for classic darkroom techniques seminars/workshops given by retired old foxes also increased
And became a real source of revenus for some.
It also has a social influence, people tending to group themselves around their interest for film...
Film is not dead.
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