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Author Topic: Joy at the End of the Day  (Read 1084 times)

Two23

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Joy at the End of the Day
« on: May 14, 2018, 07:42:58 pm »

From Chicago Blue Line.  Camera was a Leica IIIc with Elmar 50mm f3.5, (both vintage 1942,) HP5.  Barnack would smile! :)

"Lady Madonna, lying on the bed,
Listen to the music playing in your head..."



Kent in SD
« Last Edit: May 14, 2018, 08:02:43 pm by Two23 »
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drmike

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2018, 02:46:25 am »

Nice one but for me it lacks a little crispness. It does have some good composition and holds some genuine interest.

Mike
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Rob C

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2018, 05:55:12 am »

Really gets to the sense of being in a world of one's own.

Kinda reminds me of how I feel sometimes, wandering around the house with the miracle of bluetooth (?), the Internet and some Louisiana radio station's swamp pop rock in my head (going to say echoing, but felt it could make me a hostage to future fortune, so I won't).

Love it!

This new space is bringing a flood of good pictures few imagined lay dormant in the drives!

Thanks, Jeremy, for enabling it.

Rob

RSL

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2018, 06:55:49 am »

A fine shot, Kent. Doesn't need any more "crispness."
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Martin Kristiansen

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2018, 10:46:57 am »

Nice one. I like the way it has been processed as well.
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stamper

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2018, 11:22:26 am »

I like this kind of thing. It is hard to get it crisp unless you selectivity sharpen the image.

RSL

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2018, 11:27:06 am »

I guess my question is: why do we want it "crisp?" It's about motion, and the emotion behind the motion. There's a story there. You can't really tell from the picture what the story is, but you can reach inside yourself and come up with some possibilities. That's ambiguity working to make a good street shot.
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drmike

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2018, 11:43:38 am »

My feeling was that for whatever reason the figure is tending towards clarity without actually doing so. I don't think there's anything that can be done, local sharpening is a bit too crude I imagine.

Mike
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RSL

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2018, 11:49:56 am »

Why does it even matter, Mike? This isn't a giant landscape where you get out your magnifier and move close and study it to see how "sharp" it is. It's a street shot. You either get the whole thing at first glance or you don't. And this one grabs me. If it didn't grab you it's time to move on to a "sharp" landscape. It ain't a beauty contest. It's a slice of life.
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drmike

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2018, 11:55:49 am »

You may be right but when I have the choice I tend to choose to clear or choose to do blurred which I agree in this case is probably appropriate. It's his little dance of joy. It is a nice shot that appeals on first and second look.

Mike
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BobDavid

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2018, 02:46:19 pm »

A fine shot, Kent. Doesn't need any more "crispness."

+1
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Two23

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2018, 10:26:50 pm »

I'll talk a little bit about this image.  I love wandering the subways and Loop trains in Chicago.  I have nothing like that within a long day's drive of where I live.  I was wandering the central part of the city for a couple of days with my Leica IIIc camera (c.1942) and Leica Elmar lenses 28mm f4, 35mm, 50mm f3.5 (vintage 1932), 90mm, camera had VIOOH finder on top.  Metering with a Minolta IV, mostly shooting Ilford HP5 (ISO 400).  All of this fit in a tiny little bag; none of it attracted any attention.  I was wandering the Blue Line subway during rush hour and stuck around into early evening.  Camera was set up for correct exposure (never changes down in the tubes!) for quick shots.  I saw this woman waiting on the platform; she seemed to have just gotten off work and was headed home.  As a train was loading she began to do a little dance of pure joy.  I was riveted!  I wanted to shoot a wide aperture and isolate her against the train, but the 50mm lens only went to f3.5.  I then realized the train would soon move and that would blur it.  I wanted the woman fairly sharp but wanted just a little blur to show she was dancing--didn't want her frozen.  Pulled the camera up to my eye, focused the lens, snapped the shot at something like 1/30s.  I included the pillar with "J Jackson" to give a sense of place, and provide one element that was very sharp/immobile.  I got what I wanted. :)

The lenses made before the mid 1940s were uncoated so they have less contrast than modern multicoated lenses.  They also tend to be sharp in the center and quickly get softer from there.   I like this classic look.  Shooting 1/30s or 1/60s with ISO 400 down in the tubes is about the best my 85 year old lens and 75 year old camera can do. ;)   Most here are likely used to modern multicoated lenses, fast AF, and cameras that can shoot ISO 10,000 with ease.  Those give a completely different look to an image, and a different experience in the field.  For street shooting I still prefer the classics. ;D  I'm more after the "feel" of what I saw than a state of the art image. I like urban shots to look a little "gritty," and ISO 400 b&w film and uncoated lenses delivers that.  Does any of this make sense?


Kent in SD
« Last Edit: May 15, 2018, 10:48:37 pm by Two23 »
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drmike

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Re: Joy at the End of the Day
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2018, 02:40:20 am »

Makes sense to me! Not equipment I'd choose to use though having done so some 40 years ago :)

Mike
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