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Author Topic: David Osborn's PS technique  (Read 1244 times)

scrollop

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David Osborn's PS technique
« on: May 12, 2018, 05:57:50 PM »

Hello,
 I found the Mr David Osborn's recent article on how he processes images interesting and inspirational.

I wouldn't be aiming for such a processed image myself, though am interested in how to merge layers of photographs of the same scene but with different lighting (as cloud cover disperses etc) to create the lighting effects you want at each part of the photo to create your final, visualized image.

https://www.photoshopworkshops.com/tutorials/learn-photoshop-editing/

Do you think it is a matter of mostly layering all of the images and masking/removing what you don't want from the scene, using different blending modes plus dodging/burning?


Thank you
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Peano

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2018, 09:13:28 PM »

Do you think it is a matter of mostly layering all of the images and masking/removing what you don't want from the scene, using different blending modes plus dodging/burning?
Yes, that's a basic and very useful technique, regardless of whether your aim is traditional outcomes or more extreme effects like Osborn.
 
« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 09:23:12 PM by Peano »
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scrollop

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2018, 03:58:35 AM »

Thank you.

If you have taken a number of exposures with different lighting, and in photoshop you can't find a frame that, for a part of your project, doesn't prioduce the lighting you want, do you dodge/burn, or overexpose one frame and mask that in?

DO you know if there is a resource that looks in depth at this (I can't find the right terms to find one)?

Thanks.
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Graham Welland

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2018, 04:34:28 PM »

You might want to take a look at Vincent Versace's Welcome to Oz 2.0 book where he covers the art of image harvesting to produce the best overall image with lighting etc.
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Graham

StoryinPictures

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2018, 07:46:23 AM »

Thank you.

If you have taken a number of exposures with different lighting, and in photoshop you can't find a frame that, for a part of your project, doesn't prioduce the lighting you want, do you dodge/burn, or overexpose one frame and mask that in?

DO you know if there is a resource that looks in depth at this (I can't find the right terms to find one)?

Thanks.

You might want to look at Tony Kuyper on Luminosity Masking. He also offers videos by Sean Bagshaw on how these are used in images. Some are doubtless available free so you can get an idea if that is what you are after.

Dan Margulis might be worth perusing. Fair warning, it will take some work to make your way through his materials. I would start by downloading his PPW plug in, which is free, and watching the associated videos.  Then look at the supporting documents with the PPW, which are filled with information.  After that, he has three books.  And join the online discussion group.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 01:23:55 AM by StoryinPictures »
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StoryinPictures

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2018, 07:50:57 AM »


Osborn certainly seems interesting and his layered photoshop file would be tempting if it were not $50+
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sc_john

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2018, 09:24:16 PM »

Osborn certainly seems interesting and his layered photoshop file would be tempting if it were not $50+


I downloaded his file, and I think it was worth it... for me. I learned a lot about what I need to learn.

John
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StoryinPictures

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2018, 07:04:49 PM »


I downloaded his file, and I think it was worth it... for me. I learned a lot about what I need to learn.

Great to hear from an actual user of the product.

What types of things did you get out of it?  How many RAW files served to make that image?
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Lundberg02

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2018, 07:49:01 PM »

It's Tony KUYPER
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sc_john

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2018, 11:40:23 AM »

Great to hear from an actual user of the product.

What types of things did you get out of it?  How many RAW files served to make that image?

He uses techniques that I was not familiar with. I was able to find various tutorials that covered these techniques and helped me get a better understanding of his approach. Regarding the number of raw files, I believe the scene is a blend of 2 different exposures. As you would expect, he uses a lot of adjustment layers. I was impressed with the subtlety of many of his adjustments and the vision leading to the end product. Again, I found the fully proceeded image to be quite informative.   

John
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LesPalenik

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Re: David Osborn's PS technique
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2018, 07:09:55 AM »

The number of layers in David's example is stagerring. I estimate that there are about 40 layers in the file - all Photoshop layers and layer groups. Of course, these concepts could be adapted to other editing programs, such as Affinity or Gimp.
To simplify the process and reduce the number of PS layers, I might try to do the initial adjustments in Lightroom and then take the half-finished file to PS.   
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