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Author Topic: Photo Backpack Recommendaton  (Read 12126 times)

felix5616

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Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« on: March 23, 2018, 02:41:16 pm »

Looking for suggestions for a photo backpack for a Fuji GFX 50S, 32-64mm lens, 23mm lens and possibly a 110mm lens. I would aslo like to carry a CF tripod and Arca Swiss D 4 head
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Joe Towner

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2018, 03:56:11 pm »

Sticking in town, or heading out of town?  Photo backpack looking or incognito?  Waterproof level required?

Room for extra stuff (computer/iPad/??) or just minimalist camera function.

I love sling bags, as I can swap lenses without setting the bag down.
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DougDolde

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2018, 06:14:53 pm »

I use a Thinktank Streetwalker for a D850 and three Zeiss lenses. Very nice bag and they have larger models which you might or might not need.
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Farmer

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2018, 06:45:43 pm »

As Joe says, it really depends a lot on needs other than just the equipment being carried.

I just picked up a Mindshift First Light 30l - and it's fantastic.  Meets standard carry-on for air travel, took, at that size (a key consideration for me).  I've moved to that from a very good LowePro ProTactic 450 AW of a similar size.  The Mindshift is just better thought out and better segregated internally.  It doesn't feature quick access pockets like the LowePro but I have more useable space from the same size.

I carry an A7rii with grip, Sony 24-70 f/2.8 GM, Sony 70-200 f/2.8 GM with a 1.4 teleconverter, a Sigma 105 f/2.8 Macro EX, a Sony 50 f/1.4, Sony F60 flash, Sony clip-on external LCD, Surface Book, batteries, memory cards in a Pelican mini-case, chargers, cables, bush hat, gloves, torch, phone, and all the stuff quite easily (actually, I change that around, but when I'm travelling I pack it very full and add to it other basic personal stuff).  All works.  Tripod externally.  Comfortable, durable.

You're going to get a zillion opinions on this.  Once you have a few in mind from reading or finding online etc., best bet is to mention them and see if anyone has any feedback on them.
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Phil Brown

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2018, 07:37:44 pm »

I recommended this pack before I have an older version than the current offering you might check it out?

allan@atlaspacks.com

Allan is quite the upfront guy sent me two packs FedEx then spent an hour on the phone rearranging my Hasselblad system in the pack until it fit and more importantly was extremely comfortable. You can carry two tripods (although I only carry one) it has a built in water system attachment.

for the price nothing compares

aluminum frame and great hip belt with pockets

I have the H6 body, 100mm, 28mm, 1.7x, HTS 1.5, 210mm, hoods, 150x170mm filter case, nisi 150mm filter holder, RRS pano, loupe, light meter, 3 batteries, battery charger, flashlight, head lamp, 95mm CPL, and etc. with lots of room to spare. the pack is heavy loaded but I also use a waist belt system which holds my filter box and two lenses, this setup makes it easy to change lenses standing on rocks in the ocean.
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felix5616

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2018, 09:56:31 pm »

for trekking locally in the woods or to the shore, one day trips, waterproof would be nice but an available cover would be fine.
would like to carry some water(1 liter) lite snacks and maybe a shell jacket and lite gloves
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Ranger Rick

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2018, 11:20:31 pm »

I own the MindShift Backlight 26L- light, roomy, I like the rear panel access (great to not get dirty back from the traditional bag access).  There's also a larger one, but I would think the 26L would do the job.
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Kevin Raber

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2018, 07:57:08 am »

I use two that have been working really well for me.  The Dakine . https://www.dakine.com/en-us/bags/backpacks/photography-backpacks/sequence-33l-backpack/ . and Tamrac https://www.tamrac.com/collections/backpacks/products/anvil-27 . and as you may know I travel a lot and to some out of the normal areas.  Both these packs have done me well.  This article shows how the Dakine is packed. https://luminous-landscape.com/off-to-the-palouse/ . This one shows it being used in Antarctica https://luminous-landscape.com/off-south-georgia-antarctica/.  And this one shows me packing up the TAmrac . https://luminous-landscape.com/were-off-to-greenland/

I have just about every pack you can think of yet these are my go-to bags more than not.
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tcphoto1

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2018, 11:16:13 am »

You're not going to fool anyone by carrying a tripod, it may have the opposite effect. I have a Timbuk2 Messenger bag and Snoop Insert that works quite well. I can fit a 1Dx w/short lens attached, two additional lenses and extra batteries.
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shadowblade

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2018, 01:05:38 pm »

One can never have enough camera bags.

It all depends on what needs to be accomplished - and the gear to be carried is just about the least important parameter in choosing the bag.

Does it need to fit in airline carry-on? Is quick accessibility or security more important? What about stealth - does it have to not look like it contains cameras? Do you need to be able to hide the tripod inside the bag? What else do you need to carry at the same time? Does it need to be weather-resistant? How far do you expect to be walking with it?

On varied trips, where I would expect to shoot in all sorts of different settings, I often end up bringing three or four camera bags, choosing the one most appropriate for the task at hand and leaving the rest back at the hotel/tent/base camp.
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danielc

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2018, 04:29:56 pm »

A quick recommendation for the Fstop Sukha, and F stop in general.

Comfortable, well made, suitable for purpose.

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Eric Brody

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2018, 06:02:04 pm »

Whatever you choose, if possible look at it in a store. Many bags look and sound great until you pick them up. Check the EMPTY WEIGHT! While many brands have improved their weight over the recent past, eg Lowepro, be aware that for overseas travel, some airlines eg Air New Zealand, limit you to a 7kg carry on. Sounds like a lot until you get started with lenses and accessories. An important question is whether you want significant room for other "stuff" besides camera gear, eg food, clothing, depending where you're going.

I've been using a Mindshift 26L with my Sony A7RIII, three zooms, 16-35GM, 24-70GM, 70-200G, and a couple of Nikon PC-E's with an adapter. I measures and if I give up the PC-E's, I can carry a 100-400GM. It has a decent suspension, for me. Then there's batteries, cards, cleaning stuff, framing card, various cables, a filters. Here in the great Pacific Northwest it rains, a lot. It's common to have to put the pack down on wet ground, mud, or wet sand. It's nice to put the front down so that when you pick it up, the mud/sand is not all over your back. It's also good security since the opening to the gear is against your back. A pickpocket will get only my sandwich and coat, not my camera. The 26L has a good tripod carrying system as well. I use a Gitzo 3530 and Arca D4.

For walking around in town, I use a Thinktank Retrospective. It would carry a GFX and the 32-64 easily.

I had heard great things about F-Stop bags, but also heard horrible things about their inability to deliver despite taking your money. I had one bad personal experience with them a couple of years ago. I hope they've solved their problems because the concept seems sound.

Best of luck to you on your quest. Remember... everyone has too many bags and everyone loves the one they're currently using  ;D
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jeremyrh

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2018, 06:54:17 am »

A quick recommendation for the Fstop Sukha, and F stop in general.

Comfortable, well made, suitable for purpose.
Another recommendation for f-stop - I will also mention the empty weight, which is good, and also the fact that when you take out the camera inserts you have a very big simple backpack with a large lid for accessibility - perfect for grocery shopping :-)
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ned

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2018, 02:03:31 pm »

Love my fstop bag.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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farbschlurf

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2018, 03:16:39 pm »

Don't want to hijack the thread, but: I'm also looking for a backpack and get slightly mad about that, slowly. Good to see some recommendations here. I find it especially hard to find a backpack that doubles as a (real) daypack and still offers some accessibility for the gear. Right now I even end up using a normal backpack for personal stuff and a additional shoulder back (I tend to change lens almost every shot ... my bad habit) but that pretty much the opposite of comfortable. I know there are those mindshifts with the rotational "belly-pack". I tried but at first experience I just don't get it using it ... do you get used to that?! Maybe a real user of those, here?
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armand

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2018, 04:09:37 pm »

Don't want to hijack the thread, but: I'm also looking for a backpack and get slightly mad about that, slowly. Good to see some recommendations here. I find it especially hard to find a backpack that doubles as a (real) daypack and still offers some accessibility for the gear. Right now I even end up using a normal backpack for personal stuff and a additional shoulder back (I tend to change lens almost every shot ... my bad habit) but that pretty much the opposite of comfortable. I know there are those mindshifts with the rotational "belly-pack". I tried but at first experience I just don't get it using it ... do you get used to that?! Maybe a real user of those, here?

I have one, the biggest. I use it less as it is a little heavier and I don't go that much on photography only trips.
It is quite practical though as I took out the top organizer and I use that for clothing, food, etc and there is enough space for even a overnight trip.
The rotating part is not the most effective space utilization but it is convenient, I think it would work the best combined with a peak design shoulder quick release where you keep the camera readily available and have the rotation component for lenses.
Overall it's quite comfortable to carry.

dchew

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2018, 09:57:59 pm »

Don't want to hijack the thread, but: I'm also looking for a backpack and get slightly mad about that, slowly. Good to see some recommendations here. I find it especially hard to find a backpack that doubles as a (real) daypack and still offers some accessibility for the gear.

I put an f-stop small pro ICU in this one:

Mammut Trion Pro

Opens top and back like an F-stop but also a fully functional climbing/ski pack.

Dave
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NancyP

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2018, 02:32:21 pm »

For women, fine under-seat-stowing (for regional flights with smaller than usual on-board luggage capacity): the REI Trail 25L women-specific pack, has U-zipper, will take an 11.0 x 11.0 x 5.0" f-stop "medium" insert, has daisy-chain for attaching other stuff. This carried well. Must pull out insert slightly to access fully.
A men's REI Trail 25L is also available, only difference is shape and size of suspension.
More later.
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Joe Towner

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2018, 05:47:26 pm »

One can never have enough camera bags.

I'm a bag of the month quitter! There is such a thing as enough/too many, I'm trying my damnedest to get down to 2 or 3.  This is where your local camera store really is a gem - take your stuff in and see what fits.  See if it matches your ergonomics and holds things where you want.  Oh, and buy it from them while you're there.

A GFX plus a few lenses is pretty easy.  It's when you're up to 2 bodies, plus 6 lenses, flashes, etc that things get complicated - or you have odd shaped bodies like the XF, H or 645.  Things like height, body mass and structure all play in to what fits well.
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shadowblade

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Re: Photo Backpack Recommendaton
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2018, 11:23:00 pm »

I'm a bag of the month quitter! There is such a thing as enough/too many, I'm trying my damnedest to get down to 2 or 3.  This is where your local camera store really is a gem - take your stuff in and see what fits.  See if it matches your ergonomics and holds things where you want.  Oh, and buy it from them while you're there.

A GFX plus a few lenses is pretty easy.  It's when you're up to 2 bodies, plus 6 lenses, flashes, etc that things get complicated - or you have odd shaped bodies like the XF, H or 645.  Things like height, body mass and structure all play in to what fits well.

There are so many different, and often conflicting, requirements for different tasks that it's impossible to fulfil them with just 2-3 bags.

Let's see:

- Airline transport - it needs to protect all your gear, fit within the size limits and weigh as little as possible. Small regional airlines in various parts of the world often have even more stringent carry-on requirements. When you're that close to the weight limit (or over it) and the bag's going to be sitting in the overhead compartment anyway, ergonomics don't matter. F-stop inserts are great for this, since they're removable. May consist of a combination of bags and jackets.

- Wildlife shooting in Africa - needs to be a backpack (since you'll be carrying it a lot), hold large supertele lenses and a full-size monopod/tripod. There probably won't be room for much else in the bag.

- Hiking - needs to hold food, spare clothing, camping gear, etc. in addition to the camera gear. Also needs rain protection. Access to gear may be slow.

- Kayaking - needs to be waterproof (not just water-resistant) when closed. I just put the whole thing inside a roll-top, waterproof bag, but that means zero access to the gear on the fly.

- Travel through risky areas - needs to not look like a camera bag. Tripods and other shooting equipment need to be carried inside the bag. Entrance to the camera compartment should be against your back. Mutually-incompatible with 'quick access'.

- Casual shooting around town, in safer areas - a shoulder bag allows for far more rapid access than a backpack, so that you don't have to put it down every time you want to shoot, better manoeuvrability on public transport, in crowded areas, narrow laneways, etc., and a far lower likelihood of being stopped from entering stores, shopping centres, etc. than when wearing a large backpack. Doesn't carry as much gear as a backpack (at least not comfortably)

Multiple configurations for each situation may be needed, depending on exactly what you need to carry (tripods/monopods, tripod heads, long telephotos, UWAs, etc.).
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