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Author Topic: Twilight at Ginzan Onsen, Japan  (Read 888 times)

shadowblade

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Twilight at Ginzan Onsen, Japan
« on: March 19, 2018, 02:24:35 pm »

Ginzan Onsen, Yamagata Prefecture, Japan.

Intermittent snow flurries during evening twilight on a winter's day.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2018, 11:18:44 pm by shadowblade »
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Twilight at Ginzan Onsen, Japan
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2018, 02:49:33 pm »

They are, of course, well done, but I can't help thinking that starting shooting 15-20 minutes earlier would have produced a more balanced (daylight/street/building lights) and pleasing result.

shadowblade

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Re: Twilight at Ginzan Onsen, Japan
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2018, 02:51:49 pm »

15-20 minutes earlier the lights weren't even on.
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Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Twilight at Ginzan Onsen, Japan
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2018, 04:11:54 am »

Nice.

thierrylegros396

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Re: Twilight at Ginzan Onsen, Japan
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2018, 11:41:32 am »

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Dave (Isle of Skye)

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Re: Twilight at Ginzan Onsen, Japan
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2018, 05:55:34 pm »

They are, of course, well done, but I can't help thinking that starting shooting 15-20 minutes earlier would have produced a more balanced (daylight/street/building lights) and pleasing result.

15-20 minutes earlier the lights weren't even on.

I think the answer that both of you seek, is that in shots of this type with a mix of 'Blue Hour' daylight and man made night time illumination, is to find your best composition well before the light has started to fade, then without changing that composition or your settings (other than exposure time, which of course you could use Aperture Priority so the camera does this for you), is to then shoot through from daylight through to darkness. Then back at your computer select the shot that appears to have the best balance of light throughout the scene.

Only drawback to the above suggestion is that you are only going to get one correctly balanced composition, but if it is by far the best composition that you could have chosen, which of course it should be, then why not give it a go  ;)

Dave
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