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Author Topic: Canola Field Fantasy  (Read 4153 times)

David Eckels

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Canola Field Fantasy
« on: January 25, 2018, 09:39:00 AM »

C&C welcome
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 01:33:48 PM by David Eckels »
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RSL

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2018, 09:51:06 AM »

Interesting shot, David. I suspect someone will object to the horizon being in the center of the picture, but I think it's right on here. There's a lot of rapeseed in that field.

Rajan Parrikar

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2018, 12:21:58 PM »

Love it.

opgr

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2018, 12:45:05 PM »

What's the point of this image?

Not trying to be dismissive, just asking.
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~ O ~

sierraman

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2018, 02:29:56 PM »

I like it too. Maybe try moving the horizon, maybe not.  :)
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Rob C

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2018, 02:47:44 PM »

What's the point of this image?

Not trying to be dismissive, just asking.


This is difficult to address without offending swathes of photographers, but as with all landscape, I'm left wondering where the hell the model went. Without her/him, there really is no overpowering reason for making an exposure unless for money.

Russ has pointed this out before, and he's right: interesting photographs are about people and their things. Remove either the human and/or signs of its creativity and we are looking at documentation, which may or may not be pretty - that is a matter of selection, opinion and luck. The best-lit tree on the brink of the Grand Canyon is still just a tree in a precarious spot on one of the biggest ditches in the world.

I think I'd better add one of these:   :-)




Peter McLennan

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2018, 02:52:47 PM »

Love it.

Totally, Rajan. 

Rings clear to me.  Lovely image.

Rob can keep his scantily clad models. :)
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RSL

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2018, 03:05:45 PM »


This is difficult to address without offending swathes of photographers, but as with all landscape, I'm left wondering where the hell the model went. Without her/him, there really is no overpowering reason for making an exposure unless for money.

Russ has pointed this out before, and he's right: interesting photographs are about people and their things. Remove either the human and/or signs of its creativity and we are looking at documentation, which may or may not be pretty - that is a matter of selection, opinion and luck. The best-lit tree on the brink of the Grand Canyon is still just a tree in a precarious spot on one of the biggest ditches in the world.

I think I'd better add one of these:   :-)

You know I'm going to agree with you, Rob, but if Andreas Gursky could sell Rhine II for 4.3 million, David ought to be able to sell this one for at least 5 million. David's colors are a lot better.

Rob C

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2018, 04:37:42 PM »

Totally, Rajan. 

Rings clear to me.  Lovely image.

Rob can keep his scantily clad models. :)


Peter, I don't want them these days.

I was looking through the web tonight at a batch of snaps of Tina Louise whom I first knew of as a model with the Peters Basch and Gowland (ages before she made tv, movies or sang songs.) to mention but two greats of then. Breaking into the group of her px was another Tina Louise with the preface Miss. Tattoos and awfully over-developed top and seat, poses that would suit a dark corner somewhere in a poor part of town, I couldn't get them off my little iPad quickly enough. Today's pin-up leaves me cold. There are, apparently, no women doing it, only constructs with limited imagination of what a woman could be, working with snappers with minds and markets to match. It's done.

What I did and loved doing is no more. The closest thing lives on with some fashion spreads. I'd love to shoot fashion again.

PeterAit

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2018, 05:07:23 PM »

What's the point of this image?

Not trying to be dismissive, just asking.

Images don't have points. Pencils and knives have points.
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Peter
"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." - Albert Einstein

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2018, 06:07:53 PM »

Images don't have points. Pencils and knives have points.
+1.

I love the image, too. And I'm glad the model walked off the set before the shutter was snapped.  :)
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David Eckels

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2018, 07:47:32 PM »

What's the point of this image?

Not trying to be dismissive, just asking.
Dismissive is OK, Oscar, especially since I asked for C&C. I would guess that this image would leave some folks cold as well as a full ranging gamut from thereon. I take the points made by Rob and previously by Russ (not this time though). By the way, Rob, the model is there if you look carefully, but she and her parts were moving so vigorously that she blurred right out due to the slow shutter speed! ;)

But, Oscar, to answer your question I can only share with you what I was seeing and feeling at the time it was taken and processed to wit the featureless horizon and the complementary colors. It seemed to me a focus, pardon the pun, upon simplicity, complementarity, and juxtaposition. I chose deliberately to avoid the rule of thirds knowing that that might also add to the tension. That's it, really. It doesn't surprise me either that this would not work for some people, but the fact that it works for others is also appreciated.

For those of you that "know" me, this is not a typical image for me, which is why I posted it here. I have learned something; I always do, whether from silence or dismissive, affirmative, or technical comments. I also learn based on the degree to which I think I understand the commenters; I have had a lot of interaction with Russ, for example, and so I compute a weighted average if you want to think about it like that. Anyway, I appreciate any response; even silence speaks louder than words. That's the best I can do. I hope it is clear.

Also, Russ, if I make just one million on an image, I am going to buy each of you a PhaseOne with a BIG digital back and their best lens! If you already have one, just a D5 or D850 with the accessory grip! ;) ;) ;)

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2018, 07:54:08 PM »

What's the point of this image?

"I will try to speak of the beauty of shapes... straight lines and curves and the shapes made of them... They are not beautiful for any particular reason or purpose, as other things are, but are eternally, and by their very nature, beautiful, and give a pleasure of their own quite free from the itch of desire: and in this way colors can give a similar pleasure."

Socrates
(& Slobodan)

Peter McLennan

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2018, 08:14:39 PM »


Peter, I don't want them these days...Today's pin-up leaves me cold... I'd love to shoot fashion again.

Don't blame you for missing fashion shoots. Arguably one of photography's most fertile fields. 
I recall lusting after Sarah Moon's work when first I discovered British Vogue. 
I, too lament the loss of velocity of those days. Maybe they'll return, driven by some kid with a photographic tool we've not yet seen

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Alskoj

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2018, 10:53:15 PM »

I like that the horizon is right down the center! 
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Richowens

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2018, 12:36:50 AM »

Rob,

 The hand of man is all over this one. The Canola didn't decide to grow in this field on its own, someone decided to plant here. Someone had to disturb the soil for the seeds to root. Someone had to spread the seeds. Someone had to pray for rain (and if you don't believe bless you anyway) to germinate the seeds. And the hand of man will have to harvest the crop.

My take on the subject,

Rich
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GrahamBy

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2018, 04:08:33 AM »

"I will try to speak of the beauty of shapes... straight lines and curves and the shapes made of them... They are not beautiful for any particular reason or purpose, as other things are, but are eternally, and by their very nature, beautiful, and give a pleasure of their own quite free from the itch of desire: and in this way colors can give a similar pleasure."

Socrates
(& Slobodan)

What they said :)

Also : http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2018/01/yellow-over-dark-blue.html
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Rob C

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2018, 04:14:16 AM »

Rob,

 The hand of man is all over this one. The Canola didn't decide to grow in this field on its own, someone decided to plant here. Someone had to disturb the soil for the seeds to root. Someone had to spread the seeds. Someone had to pray for rain (and if you don't believe bless you anyway) to germinate the seeds. And the hand of man will have to harvest the crop.

My take on the subject,

Rich



I take your point absolutely, Rich, but it's a different idea altogether.

Hand-of-man in a photographic context, to me, means his constructions such as bridges, roads, telegraph poles, cities, quaint old villages, abandoned buildings and so forth. Farmlands just merge into landscape, and there there are exceptions where both meet: the banks of a canal with trees marching down the side, shots like that can be evocative of both nature and mankind working together (or embatteled) but in this specific case, we are looking at two colour blocks that say nothing beyond the fact that they exists as two colour blocks. The HOM is so hidden as to match the fleeting model David suggested might have been present...

However, there is a whole school of painting that is/was dedicated to such images; perhaps this is photography's attempt to explore the same pasture? David would not claim to be the first snapper to try his hand at this form of expression. Thing is, photography ain't painting.

Rob C

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2018, 04:32:11 AM »

"I will try to speak of the beauty of shapes... straight lines and curves and the shapes made of them... They are not beautiful for any particular reason or purpose, as other things are, but are eternally, and by their very nature, beautiful, and give a pleasure of their own quite free from the itch of desire: and in this way colors can give a similar pleasure."

Socrates
(& Slobodan)


Indeed, Slobodan, but you have no idea what the old guy had in mind at the time or had perhaps been smoking or drinking.

Quotations such as this are just props that hold up the ship before it hits the tallow (or bananas in India) and slides down into the water, rustllng and rumbling its dusty heaps of chains behind it...

However, Socyboy aside, none of these replies answer Oscar's legitimate question beyond admitting that they, the responders, saw no point either, but dug the thing anyway or simply felt defensive.

Which is cool, but why not just admit that in the first place? Hell, I like the idea too, but don't rate it as anything constructive or creative in the slightest: it just existed. As do so many of my own shots, too, which is one reason that I feel amateur photography is a bit on doubtful ground: there is no brief, no requirement to meet, and thus no planning or working towards a definite result without which goal, anything goes. even if perhaps it were often better that it remain not done. Do you see what I mean? When everything is open season, there is no season.

GrahamBy

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Re: Canola Field Fantasy
« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2018, 07:27:56 AM »

For me it's an abstract inspired by Canola. The irony is that I started to "get" Rothko when his paintings started to suggest themselves as abstracts of landscapes: that just seems to be what vibrated in my head one day. So this is pretty much exactly the sort of landscape that Rothko could have been abstracting (if he hung the result upside down).

Doesn't matter, the colours are pretty, the texture is interesting, that's enough for me. I'd take it any day over one of those melodramatic sunset pics of purples and oranges  in a drug-fueled sky-orgy.

(Edit: added the forgotten words "of landscapes", without which the first para made little sense. Sorry).
« Last Edit: January 26, 2018, 08:26:10 AM by GrahamBy »
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