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Author Topic: Eyeglasses and camera shake  (Read 1939 times)

Bildric

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Eyeglasses and camera shake
« on: September 20, 2017, 03:47:38 PM »

I've been using my first DSLR for just over a year now and I can't seem to get past this problem with my eyeglasses.  I would like to anchor the camera against my forehead, but I cannot do this.  Overall I end up with a limited image through the viewer as I am holding the camera too far from my eye (left eyed).  Also, by not anchoring, the camera is kind of free floating.  I believe this adds to camera shake.  I'm using a Nikon D7100.  The viewfinder is weak, Liveview is weaker.  All this if for handheld.  I can work around all sight issues with a tripod. 
Can anyone advise how I might address these problems?  Thanks in advance.
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nirpat89

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Re: Eyeglasses and camera shake
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2017, 04:46:36 PM »

Short of wearing contacts, there is no solution that allows you to wear glasses and have a convenient way to look thru the viewfinder, I don't think. 

But the camera does have a diopter adjustment dial next to viewfinder that you can use to adjust the focus without your glasses. 

http://www.dummies.com/photography/cameras/nikon-camera/how-to-adjust-the-nikon-d7100s-viewfinder-focus/

D7100 has a range of -2 to +1 which may or may not suffice you.  If not you can change that range by buying an adopter that can extend the range in the direction necessary as per this Nikon literature.

https://www.nikonimgsupport.com/ni/NI_article?articleNo=000001368&configured=1&lang=en_US

I have the D7100 too and I am over +2 so I had to buy one that gave me a couple of more points so the range is now 0 to 3.  Try to buy more than necessary so you have enough adjustability below and above you need to be. 

Of course once you have corrective diopter, now you have to figure out what to do with the glasses in the mean time.... :)
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farbschlurf

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Re: Eyeglasses and camera shake
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2017, 03:49:47 AM »

Glasses and photography is annoying. There are several more issues. But it seems like one have to live with it ...
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NancyP

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Re: Eyeglasses and camera shake
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2017, 08:25:03 PM »

I have never had a problem, and I am a high myope (-10). Glasses are always on. I can't smash the camera on my face, anyway - I have a big nose. There might be a few percent of the actual field that I don't see in viewfinder - but almost ALL of the mid-level and consumer-level SLRs do not have 100% coverage of actual sensor field in viewfinder - most have 95% to 99% of eventual image.
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Dave Rosser

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Re: Eyeglasses and camera shake
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2017, 07:35:05 AM »

I've been using my first DSLR for just over a year now and I can't seem to get past this problem with my eyeglasses.  I would like to anchor the camera against my forehead, but I cannot do this.  Overall I end up with a limited image through the viewer as I am holding the camera too far from my eye (left eyed).  Also, by not anchoring, the camera is kind of free floating.  I believe this adds to camera shake.  I'm using a Nikon D7100.  The viewfinder is weak, Liveview is weaker.  All this if for handheld.  I can work around all sight issues with a tripod. 
Can anyone advise how I might address these problems?  Thanks in advance.
Just accept you are going to have to squash your spectacles against your face with the camera viewfinder.  However make sure your viefinder eyepiece has soft surround or you will scratch your (no doubt expensive) spectacle lenses.  In the old days when I was using a Nikon F and F2 I regularaly scratched my, early plastic, spectacle lenses badly but learnt to live with it.
As an aside I can never understand why a pair of plastic spectacle lenses costs more than a multi element wide aperture camera lens.

langier

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Re: Eyeglasses and camera shake
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2017, 09:55:52 AM »

I've worn glasses for about 15 years for correction of my astigmatism and before, sunglasses, especially out in the landscape. With small cameras it can be a problem for cameras with short eyepiece relief. One of the things that saved me with my Nikons was a deeper relief, allowing me to see the entire finder.

The past few years, I've been shooting m43 cameras. On one system, I had a problem seeing the corners especially.

So maybe it's a matter of finding a camera with a deeper eye relief. Some of the cameras will give you this specification. It may be you need to try a different body to see what works for your glasses and your vision. It may be a more expensive body or even an older body that will work for you.

For me, my current m43, Oly D5 II, I don't seem to have an issue with the viewfinder, smashing it up to either eye via my glasses and shooting away. Neither an issue with any of my Nikon D cameras, from the D100 to D800 and in-between. I can't tell you about the 7x00 series since I haven't used one, but the others seem to work well with eyeglasses and the diaper correction works well.

If you opt for an eyepiece on your camera, Nikon used to have a fairly consistent 1-meter apparent distance to their screen though I don't know if that's the case today.
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