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Author Topic: To sign or not to sign  (Read 7809 times)

mseawell

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To sign or not to sign
« on: January 19, 2017, 11:15:50 am »

Good snowy day from Utah! I have a question concerning signing art. We recently got an order from a company for some metallic prints (24x32) and some large canvas pieces. My question is do you sign each piece and if so, what are you using to sign the metallic and canvas pieces?

Cheers

Mark
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BillK

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2017, 12:05:16 pm »

Yes I sign them.

My question to you would be, do you mean metallic Paper or metal - like Dye sub on Aluminum. Several things will work on metallic paper,
but the only thing I have found to work on Metal is a pen made in Germany by "Kaiser" it is made to mark on very smooth surfaces like film, glass
or metal and is permanent. Only color is black. It will work on metallic paper also.

I sign Canvas with a pen that uses acrylic paint as ink, most art stores carry them. Available in many colors.
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donbga

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 12:18:29 pm »

Good snowy day from Utah! I have a question concerning signing art. We recently got an order from a company for some metallic prints (24x32) and some large canvas pieces. My question is do you sign each piece and if so, what are you using to sign the metallic and canvas pieces?

Cheers

Mark

Yes sign each print but not inside the image area (very kitsch if you do).
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MattBurt

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2017, 12:22:11 pm »

Yes sign each print but not inside the image area (very kitsch if you do).

What about canvas prints where the image area covers it all? Or are those kitsch just by their nature?
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Peter McLennan

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2017, 12:23:09 pm »

Why not embed your signature in the image data?
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donbga

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2017, 10:51:54 am »

What about canvas prints where the image area covers it all? Or are those kitsch just by their nature?

Place your mark or signature on the verso. Signatures in the image area of photographs are extremely tacky IMO especially when signed with a metallic pen.

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tom b

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2017, 11:12:24 am »

I just bought two framed photographic prints from Stills Gallery, Sydney. No signature, but a label on the back giving details about the photographs provenance.

Cheers,
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Tom Brown

donbga

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2017, 08:40:21 pm »

I resemble that remark. Another opinion...

1) Why would you not want your signature visible? Have you ever seen a painting without a signature? Your signature is your calling card. It shows viewers who produced the art. I sell "signed" prints. In my market the signature adds value.
2) If you sign somewhere other than on the image itself, there is no guarantee your signature will be visible when the piece is displayed. It can be covered by a frame or a mat.
3) If you are worried about it looking kitsch, then avoid splattering a large gaudy dramatic and illegible flourish on the image. A small simple legible signature serves the purpose. I am careful to choose a color and location that does not draw attention.

Signed work always adds value. Tacky signatures included in the image area do not. I did not suggest placing a signature where it can't be seen - but not in the image area. Photographers signatures typically or traditionally are placed in the lower right hand corner (right hand relative to the signer) of the print border. If you produce a borderless print then mark the print on the back (verso) of the print in a manner appropriate for the medium.

Any mark in the image area diminishes the work IMO and in the opinion of many collectors, curators, and gallerists.

I can see by looking at your images on your web page that your name is (copyright mark) splattered right in the image area. Why? Do you really fear some one stealing your work using a low res image?

I also imprint my mark with an embossment to indicate that I printed the work.

Per your website:
Signature
Unless you request otherwise, I sign all photos in the lower right corner, on the image itself, not in the border.  A certificate of authenticity is included with all prints.

But do as you wish and I'm sure you will.

Don Bryant
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pcgpcg

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2017, 01:11:58 am »

Any mark in the image area diminishes the work IMO and in the opinion of many collectors, curators, and gallerists.
Good feedback. Thanks.
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Rob C

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2017, 09:41:23 am »

What about canvas prints where the image area covers it all? Or are those kitsch just by their nature?

Matt, I thought all canvas prints were kitsch. Whether or not they consume the entire area.

;-)

Rob C

MattBurt

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2017, 09:43:50 am »

I guess so. Kitsch sells!

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

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Deardorff

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2017, 12:18:36 pm »

Yet painters selling work for tens of thousands of $$$ sign in the image area all the time.

Do whatever works for you.

To quote Ansel Adams on signing - do it legibly so the buyer will know who to write the check.
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TonyVentourisPhotography

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2017, 07:57:14 am »

Yet painters selling work for tens of thousands of $$$ sign in the image area all the time.

Do whatever works for you.

To quote Ansel Adams on signing - do it legibly so the buyer will know who to write the check.

And on that note... I'm generally more interested in getting my buyer's signature than someone getting mine.  I prefer signing or placing an info card on the rear.
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trinhdinhha

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2017, 04:22:37 am »

Yes i sign That is a contract agreement.

patjoja

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2017, 02:02:36 am »

Yes sign each print but not inside the image area (very kitsch if you do).

I've been back and forth on where to sign my work a hundred times.  I know that photographers have historically signed outside the image, but painters have been signing their work on the image surface for centuries.  I started out signing my prints below the image area, but doing that makes it much more difficult to mat and frame.  I then started signing with a white pen within the image area and I think it looks much better...not kitsch at all. 

Everyone is different, so ymmv.  When my work is matted by my customers, they don't have to worry about making allowance for my sig since it's inside the image. 

Patrick
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petermfiore

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2017, 03:02:51 am »

Painters sign there paintings...yes, because they are one of a kind work of art. An original work of art. Painters also have made traditional prints(editions) for hundreds of years. Etchings, lithographs, woodcuts, engravings and silkscreens all signed lower right below the image. Also numbered on the left below image and titled in center below the image.

Hope this helps a bit...

Peter

danielc

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Re: To sign or not to sign
« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2017, 03:28:29 am »

I sell my work very regularly and I sign each image with a small initial digitally in the corner of the image, usually in white.

I do this per image as I finish editing the image, any prints done of the image will contain that exact signature.

I have sold USD$30k of work in the past 6 months and have not had ANY complaints about the signature being obtrusive, tacky or anything else.

I in fact get complaints if I forget to include the signature on a print, as I have done with some of my earlier work.

I'm selling to homeowners and tourists, not art afficionado's so your mileage may vary, but that's what works for me.

I have attached an image of my normal, small 16" wide size image with the signature, and a $900 Aluminium print which I sold today with the signature.

Dan
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