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Author Topic: Abstraction Part 1  (Read 1459 times)

churly

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Abstraction Part 1
« on: November 23, 2016, 06:45:01 pm »

Alain  - I'm lookin forward to part two to see where you go with it.  I am still pondering part 1 but as far as I can tell neither of the images included in the article qualify as abstracts.
Best, Chuck
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Chuck Hurich

Ray

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Re: Abstraction Part 1
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2016, 12:22:53 am »

Alain  - I'm lookin forward to part two to see where you go with it.  I am still pondering part 1 but as far as I can tell neither of the images included in the article qualify as abstracts.
Best, Chuck

Yes. Good article.

I would certainly agree that the image of Death Valley Playa from Dante's Peak is not an abstract. Even if one is totally unfamiliar with the location, it seems pretty obvious that the image is depicting an arid region with water flowing over it.

However, the first image, 'Reflections', is more of an abstract, but not fully abstract because reflections in water are a common subject nowadays, and I suspect if this image were presented without title, and the viewers were asked what they thought it represented, most would probably say 'reflections of some sort'.

However, if you were to ask them to be more specific, 'reflections of what?', I think the answers would be inconsistent and variable.
I therefore think that the first image is certainly more abstract than the second image in the article. Perhaps one would describe the first image as a 'semi-abstract'.

This situation is not 'either/or'. There's a broad spectrum from what is clearly identifiable as a depiction of a real and recognisable scene, to what is no more than a strange and intriguing pattern of light and shape, that appeals emotionally, but which depicts nothing that one can identify as real.

Jackson Pollock's Blue Poles, owned by the Australian Government, is an example of an extreme abstract. However, if you were to ask me what it represents in reality, I'd say it's an imaginary depiction of our neural network, brain cells and synapses.    ;D
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one iota

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Re: Abstraction Part 1
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2016, 12:55:41 am »

The very act of photographing and producing an image of something abstracts it. It can never be the thing itself. After that it gets tricky as the spectrum of abstraction is broad. I could argue with Alain about his exclusions. Ultimately as Ray suggests and being one of the 24 million owners of Pollock's Blue Poles the test of whether something is art or merely description is whether it sparks the neurons and the synapses to produce an emotional as well as an intellectual response. I too look forward to the next parts.  :)
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Mahn England
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