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Author Topic: Editing in Too-Dark a Room  (Read 13081 times)

digitaldog

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Re: Editing in Too-Dark a Room
« Reply #40 on: September 06, 2016, 09:53:26 am »


Since Frans insisted in the thread he helped lock down (before this one does):
How about this https://www.adobe.com/digitalimag/pdfs/calibrating_digital_darkroom.pdf


The same color scientist, (Karl Lang) I mentioned below who writes:

With the light output levels of current display technology, an ambient light level of 4 lux is an optimal compromise. While a lower light level would provide better results, it’s impractical. You need to be able to walk around your environment. Above 16 lux, the room ambient will have a very significant effect on the dynamic range of the display.\

As to the point about lower light levels provide better results (which Frans dismisses in two threads here), I also pointed out the impracticability to some degree if you can't find a way to turn on the lights when not editing: The ONLY downside is possibly bumping into something, otherwise, the lack of ambient light means none is striking the display. Which is good!

Meanwhile, not a lick of evidence from Frans that a too dark room (undefined but now the bar is 4 Lux) will result in images/prints that are too dark. I'd suspect he could spend his valuable time trying to prove that but alas, no. Maybe a letter to Enrique Peña Nieto explaining how he will pay for the wall is better time spent than trying to dismiss two color scientists, the ISO and other members here?  :o
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Christopher Sanderson

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Re: Editing in Too-Dark a Room
« Reply #41 on: September 06, 2016, 10:13:59 am »

Time to move on from the Frans & Andrew Show

Thank you all and good night!
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