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Author Topic: Image Culling with Capture One  (Read 5033 times)

Avalanche

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Image Culling with Capture One
« on: August 29, 2016, 05:52:03 am »

Can anyone who has been using Capture One for some time share how they handle image culling after the initial import?

I tried to do that for a small project with only 150 images and found it very tedious to check for image sharpness. As I understand it, I can zoom to 100% (View > Zoom in Viewer > 100%) at the center of the image and then pan across the image to the position that I would like to check for sharpness. This is just a pain.

The mouse wheel lets me zoom in to the position of the cursor. But still, I find it very hard to use: I overshoot frequently due to the initial loading time of the image. I would need to stop turning the wheel at the 100% mark but I end up at 200% or 400% far too often. This also affects panning. It's really hard to see when you can start panning (i.e. image is completely loaded) after opening a new image in the viewer. Sometimes I might even get lost because of that. In the image there is no indication of your current position (at least not if the viewer is a separate window on your second screen).

I am aware of the loupe tool but the bubble is significantly smaller than my 24" screen. I really would like to see more context.

I feel like this simple task just takes orders of magnitude longer with Capture One than with any other application. Is there really no "100% zoom to current mouse location and back to full image" as in Aperture or Lightroom? I know these are basics. Am I missing something? Right now, I just can't imagine processing a 1500 image shoot with Capture One efficiently. How do you guys handle this?
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Manoli

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2016, 06:50:52 am »

Can anyone who has been using Capture One for some time share how they handle image culling after the initial import?

Use Fast Raw Viewer ( http://www.fastrawviewer.com ). The advantages too numerous to go into here and I can't add anything that isn't already well explained on their web site. As far as culling goes look closely a how well it handles 'rejected' files ( moves them into a separate subfolder either directly below current folder or one of your choosing) .

Huge time saver , not just for C1 but any other RAW converter too. Also works on jpeg's.

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N80

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2016, 09:13:25 am »

I zoom to 100% by clicking on the zoom bar at the right top and then user the Navigator to move the window around to see the whole image. I use the loupe set to 200% if I really need to see something up close. This is about as easy as it gets and no more difficult than Aperture and in my opinion, much better than LR.
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George

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Bart_van_der_Wolf

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2016, 09:24:44 am »

Can anyone who has been using Capture One for some time share how they handle image culling after the initial import?

I tried to do that for a small project with only 150 images and found it very tedious to check for image sharpness. As I understand it, I can zoom to 100% (View > Zoom in Viewer > 100%) at the center of the image and then pan across the image to the position that I would like to check for sharpness. This is just a pain.

While not perfect, Capture One has a built-in Focus Mask tool, that also shows in the thumbnails. For very critical focusing it also offers a Loupe tool (keyboard shortcut P) in 3 different sizes that you click on the image itself, and also a Focus tool that can be dragged, zoomed, and arbitrarily resized.

As mentioned, Fast Raw Viewer is a good application to use for culling, although its sharpening may be different from your Raw converter.

Cheers,
Bart
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Avalanche

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2016, 05:32:38 am »

I zoom to 100% by clicking on the zoom bar at the right top and then user the Navigator to move the window around to see the whole image. I use the loupe set to 200% if I really need to see something up close. This is about as easy as it gets and no more difficult than Aperture and in my opinion, much better than LR.

I discovered that clicking on the icons actually zooms (person on the left) out or to 100% (person on the right). View > Show Tools prevents the tools from disappearing which allows quick access to the navigator. That way, I can use the second monitor as a huge 100% loupe. That actually could work for me.

It is a lot more complicated to Aperture. (1) Double click on image, (2) move mouse to area of interest, (3) press z, (4) check, (5) press z again, (6) press cursor for next image, goto #2 ... You never need to take your eyes from the actual image.

Is there any way to get a better loading indicator? Right now, I click on an image and after a second or so it show up on the second screen at 100% but being able to pan takes another two seconds or so. If you try to pan, you'll end up with an unresponsive spinning beach ball, which I find irritating.

@Manoli:
Thanks for the link to the RAW viewer (which I didn't know about yet) I'm not sure if I really want a separate application for that, though.
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Kevin Raber

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2016, 07:11:26 am »

I use Capture One all the time as many know.  I use a Lightable mode to do my culling, ratings etc..  You can see this work on a video we have in the Capture One tutorial on this site.  I have a MacBook Pro a few years old and this works great and is fast.  See if setting up a workspace like this helps you.  Link To The Video
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Kevin Raber
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N80

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2016, 02:40:06 pm »

I have Capture One keyboard shortcuts set up so that I can advance through images with the arrow keys alone (no modifier key). In this regard it is now just like Aperture. You also have a key command for zooming in CO. You have to option-click to zoom out but I suspect you can set a custom one-key command for zooming out. I think the zoom tool in CO zooms in where the cursor is just like Aperture but I'm not sure.

I've used Aperture since they day it came out and used the same workflow you describe. CO is not going to be identical but I have found it to be just as efficient. Not the same, but in this respect just as good. You have to do some digging into CO's custom features. It is very flexible and can usually approximate whatever workflow you need.
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George

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N80

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2016, 06:06:53 pm »

I probably confused things above. Here are the best options as I see them. For each of these, set the arrow keys to advance through your images in the viewer without using a modifier key. Do this in the "Edit Keyboard Shortcuts" under the Capture One 9 menu at the top left of your screen.

1.Click on 'person' icon on the right side of the zoom bar to get to 100%. Press "H" to get the hand cursor to move around in the image. When you are done click on the 'person' icon in the left of the zoom bar to get back to 'fit on screen' size. Hit right arrow for next image. Repeat.

2. Click on 'person' icon on the right side of the zoom bar to get to 100%.Use the window in the Navigator to move around in your image. When you are done click on the 'person' icon in the left of the zoom bar to get back to 'fit on screen' size. Hit right arrow for next image. Repeat.

3. Hit the "P" key to change to the 'zoom' cursor. Click once on the spot you want to see at 100%. Option click to return to previous zoom level. Hit right arrow for next image. Repeat.

4. Any combination of the above.

With this many options I do not see the process as any worse than the typical aperture work flow.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2016, 05:19:40 pm by N80 »
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George

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Avalanche

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2016, 04:06:15 pm »

Thanks for all your answers! I'll keep on using the trial to find out whether or not I will feel at home in Capture One.
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alain

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2016, 04:31:18 pm »

Hi

For my first (and second) culling I use FastRawViewer (http://www.fastrawviewer.com).  I even use it on a laptop on the way home, if I don't have to drive myself ;-)
My type of photography (sport and podium performances) generates a lot of images and FastRawViewer makes the first cullings easy and very fast.

In capture one I tend cull only modest, but the suggestions above are very good ones.

BTW. Files for culling are always on a SSD, I move them after culling and first edit to HDD for long term storage and occasional optimizing.

Alain
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N80

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Re: Image Culling with Capture One
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2016, 10:38:10 pm »

I will add a 5th option to the ones i listed above. i just saw this mentioned on the Phase One forums and if it has been mentioned here already, I apologize, but with the hand tool selected (simply press the 'h' key) you can double click on the image and go to 100% and then double click again to come back to original viewing level. As best I can tell this zooms wherever the cursor is located. This is probably easier than Aperture. So:

5. Hit the 'h' key to select hand cursor. Double click to zoom on the cursor location. Double click again to zoom out. Right arrow to go to next image. This will be my new process.
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George

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