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Author Topic: el Salto Patagonia  (Read 8743 times)

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2016, 09:00:59 am »

I never like the Velvia look either.

The saturation in the B&W is just perfect.
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Arlen

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2016, 12:17:33 pm »

For what it's worth to those pondering this issue, Firefox is managing the image correctly (i.e., it assumes it is in sRGB color space, even without an embedded profile) on my Windows 10 machine with wide gamut monitor; whereas both Chrome and Microsoft Edge are not.
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Sean H

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2016, 12:35:59 pm »

I find my self torn,  betwixt and between both camps. I can appreciate both sides in this argument and find myself happy to be conflicted. Either way, I still enjoy the photo and I am glad that the person shared it with us. And Eric, your quote is sublime. Now I will have to re-read Shakespeare. This is why I like this forum; it is so rich thanks to the people who post their photos and comments.

Well, I find myself on the side of the schism that includes Stamper, Graeme, Cornfield and Francois, rather than the side taken by my good friends Slobodan, Framah, and Sdwilsonsct.

As Shakespeare put it, in King John (Act 4 scene 2):

"To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,
To throw a perfume on the violet,
To smooth the ice, or add another hue
Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light
To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish,
Is wasteful and ridiculous excess."

 ;)
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2016, 01:11:05 pm »

... As Shakespeare put it, in King John (Act 4 scene 2):

"To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,
To throw a perfume on the violet,
To smooth the ice, or add another hue
Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light
To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish,
Is wasteful and ridiculous excess."


Shakespeare, the hypocrite: using too many words to describe a scene is "wasteful and ridiculous excess"  :D

Sean H

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #24 on: July 04, 2016, 01:13:24 pm »

Indeed! And yet, fun! I enjoy the good-natured humour on this site.

Shakespeare, the hypocrite: using too many words to describe a scene is "wasteful and ridiculous excess"  :D
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Camerajim

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #25 on: July 04, 2016, 02:59:39 pm »

I've been following this discussion with interest. I recently joined LuLa, and for just this sort of repartee.

Here's an observation: The first major exhibition of the French impressionist painters, the "Exposition des Impressionists," was held in the salon of the photographer known as Nadar. From that point, painting has progressed through various degrees of freedom, almost always with some negative criticism along the way. In fact, this 1874 Exposition was the subject of a very critical work which labeled Monet's painting, "Impression: soleil levant," as merely a sketch, more fitted as a wallpaper pattern than as a finished work of art. Photography also went through its travails, though rather more limited by the tools available. We had the "pictorialists" and romantics and we had the f64 realists (though they knew how to torture a negative pretty well).

Today, we find ourselves confronted with as much of a challenge as that faced by the art world of 1874, when something new burst on the scene. I think we're handling it badly, too quick to condemn anything which doesn't fit our notion of a proper photo, especially among landscapes. We fail to realize that none of our depictions of reality are reality itself. And we fail to allow latitude for those who want to stretch reality more than we do.

For me, the test is if I have a reaction to the work. Does it tell me a story? Convey a feeling? Does it do this well (even if not the way I would have done it just so)?

For the OPs photo, my answers are yes, yes and yes. It's a powerful photo, even if that waterfall was never blue and even if that tree was not so red. This view tells me something about what the photographer saw in his mind and what he felt and I value that.

I'll post one of my own interpretations of reality soon and see what happens.
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #26 on: July 04, 2016, 03:42:30 pm »

Shakespeare, the hypocrite: using too many words to describe a scene is "wasteful and ridiculous excess"  :D
I'll be sure to tell him, next time I see him.   ;D
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Arlen

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #27 on: July 04, 2016, 04:25:13 pm »


Superb image! And completely circumvents any controversy over color.

No, I don't think so.  I got turned-off the instant I saw it.  Completely over saturated.  Tone it down and you have a very nice image.

In that post I was referring to his second image, the black and white one.

I'm a little surprised that people are still talking about the original image as if it is intentionally hugely over saturated, and that the differing opinions are being ascribed to whether one likes highly saturated images or not. Have those of you who think it's way too saturated tried looking at in Firefox, which renders it in the proper (sRGB) color space? It does still have a strong blue white balance in that case, but not outside the bounds of reason.

I'm attaching a copy of the original image, but with the sRGB profile assigned (as preferably should have been done to begin with), so that it should now look pretty much the same whether you view it on a standard or wide gamut monitor, or in a variety of color managed browsers. Some may still not like the way it looks, but at least improper color management should no longer be a factor.
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Paulo Bizarro

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #28 on: July 05, 2016, 04:25:08 am »

If that is what what Velvia rendered then I am glad I never used it, then again I haven't shot film.  ;) BTW I like the B&W.

Back in the early 1990's, Velvia 50 was the slide film of choice of many a landscape and nature photographer. Great to learn also, as the exposure latitude was about 1/2 stop; no room for mistakes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velvia

http://www.alexburkephoto.com/blog/2013/02/25/color-film-choices-for-landscapes

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #29 on: July 05, 2016, 09:33:09 am »

Sorry, but the new version still looks unbelievable to me, in Firefox or Internet Exploiter.
But I always preferred Kodachrome, because it never exaggerated colors.  ;)
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stamper

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #30 on: July 05, 2016, 10:00:57 am »

The newer version looks even more garish. We are all entitled to a different opinion but in all honesty you need your sunglasses on whilst viewing it.

Arlen

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #31 on: July 05, 2016, 11:25:58 am »

Internet Exploiter.

 :)

Oh well. I guess there's only so much help one can expect from a browser.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #32 on: July 05, 2016, 11:50:07 am »

For those complaining about the image not being realistic, how about hyperbole as a literary device? Enhanced saturation or contrast is to photography what hyperbole is to literature. Since we already brought Shakespeare as a witness for the prosecution, let's see how he holds under cross-examination:

Quote
"Romeo and Juliet" is filled with examples of hyperbole, such as when Romeo says that "[t]he brightness of [Juliet's] cheek would shame those stars,

Seriously, Willy!? What were you thinking!?

sierraman

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #33 on: July 05, 2016, 12:33:50 pm »

If that is what what Velvia rendered then I am glad I never used it, then again I haven't shot film.  ;) BTW I like the B&W.

Velvia was never as color-saturated as the first image is. Even though the image is over-cooked, it sure grabs your attention like it or not.  :)
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John Koerner

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #34 on: July 05, 2016, 10:55:01 pm »

Do not change a thing. This is a fine art landscape shot, not a forensic court evidence. It is powerful, striking, eye-catching, and yet some would like to drag it down to mundane.


Agree with our good friend Slobodan!! The whole thing needs to be just as it is!

Very nice!!


Agreed.

The image is enchanting as-is ... to make it less than that, as others suggest, would be a shame.
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graeme

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #35 on: July 05, 2016, 11:09:28 pm »

Sorry, but the new version still looks unbelievable to me, in Firefox or Internet Exploiter.
But I always preferred Kodachrome, because it never exaggerated colors.  ;)

+1 & I'm on a normal gamut display (calibrated ).

I used Velvia once to photograph stained glass - never again.

The B & W image looks great.
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #36 on: July 05, 2016, 11:33:41 pm »

:)

Oh well. I guess there's only so much help one can expect from a browser.
Fired Fox didn't do any better.   ;)
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photoenthusiasm

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #37 on: July 13, 2016, 12:16:46 pm »

huh? wow!
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #38 on: July 13, 2016, 01:13:44 pm »

huh? wow!

You see, that exact reaction makes it a true Art. Pop art, on the other hand, causes the opposite reaction: "Wow! Huh?" ;)

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: el Salto Patagonia
« Reply #39 on: July 13, 2016, 02:58:04 pm »

You see, that exact reaction makes it a true Art. Pop art, on the other hand, causes the opposite reaction: "Wow! Huh?" ;)
Thanks for the information, Slobodan.

I was thinking of titling a book of my photos "Wow! Huh?" but now I guess I'll have to change it to "huh? wow!"

 :D
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