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Author Topic: Calibration: How do I know what's real?  (Read 16637 times)

scyth

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #40 on: August 07, 2016, 08:53:45 pm »

But the Spyders do not have correction for BGr LED, do they?

but you can supply correction data using spectrometer


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Czornyj

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #41 on: August 08, 2016, 07:54:32 am »

Hi,
But the Spyders do not have correction for BGr LED, do they?


BTW, for anyone interest a nice article about monitor backlights
The Evolution of LED Backlights https://pcmonitors.info/articles/the-evolution-of-led-backlights/

They have corrections for different backlight types, but they are of poor quality and simply don't match - and even if they would, there's still poor inter instrumental agreement. X-Rite i1Display Pro corrections are often updated, and the sensor has very good match to standard observer CMF, so even if the correction doesn't exactly match backlight spectra the potential error is relatively small.

scyth

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #42 on: August 08, 2016, 09:52:32 am »

They have corrections for different backlight types, but they are of poor quality and simply don't match - and even if they would, there's still poor inter instrumental agreement. X-Rite i1Display Pro corrections are often updated, and the sensor has very good match to standard observer CMF, so even if the correction doesn't exactly match backlight spectra the potential error is relatively small.

but if you have Spyder 5 (a specific puck) and spectrometer (even a consumer level one - i1Pro/2) you can supply a specific calibration for that specific puck with a specific monitor, no ?
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Czornyj

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #43 on: August 08, 2016, 05:07:13 pm »

but if you have Spyder 5 (a specific puck) and spectrometer (even a consumer level one - i1Pro/2) you can supply a specific calibration for that specific puck with a specific monitor, no ?

Only when using ArgyllCMS, and such correction also introduces some errors (especially in case of LED backlit displays), due to low optical resolution of i1Pro. For optimal results such correction should be done with 5nm (or less) FWHM spectroradiometer.

digitaldog

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #44 on: August 08, 2016, 06:06:36 pm »

but if you have Spyder 5 (a specific puck) and spectrometer (even a consumer level one - i1Pro/2) you can supply a specific calibration for that specific puck with a specific monitor, no ?
Yes (if the software accepts the custom settings).
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scyth

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #45 on: August 08, 2016, 10:08:50 pm »

especially in case of LED backlit displays

and what is so special about LED vs CCFL (or whatever) in this particular scenario
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Czornyj

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #46 on: August 09, 2016, 03:59:06 am »

and what is so special about LED vs CCFL (or whatever) in this particular scenario

LED/OLED SPD curves have narrow spikes that are difficult to measure for low resolution spectroradiometers. As you can see on my diagram the i1Pro i tested is slightly less accurate than both i1D3. You can also read Graeme's excellent description of this issue here:
http://argyllcms.com/doc/i1proHiRes.html

N80

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #47 on: August 22, 2016, 03:19:22 pm »

In the case of the OP, who does not print, why bother with monitor calibration at all? The 27" iMac Retina Display is beautiful right out of the box. And in this case, the issue is purely subjective. Whether his monitor shows the proper color of an orange or apple when viewed under controlled lighting situations is irrelevant right? There is no product line requiring color correctness, etc.

My advice is to do the basic software calibration provided in OS X and leave it at that. No need to spend any money at all.
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digitaldog

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #48 on: August 22, 2016, 03:46:20 pm »

In the case of the OP, who does not print, why bother with monitor calibration at all?
Consistently! Displays are not stable devices and should be calibrated and recalibrated on a regular basis. I do mine once a month.
The RGB values I see today must visually match in a year.
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N80

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #49 on: August 23, 2016, 12:03:28 pm »

I understand the need to recalibrate if you need a calibrated monitor. But for someone who likes what he sees on his monitor, does not print and has no real need for serious color accuracy or consistency I don't see why he needs to do anything at all. He mentioned a couple of times not wanting to spend more money than he needs to. I don't think he needs to spend any at all. Not saying he shouldn't calibrate his monitor, just don't see the need.
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George

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digitaldog

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Re: Calibration: How do I know what's real?
« Reply #50 on: August 23, 2016, 12:51:19 pm »

I understand the need to recalibrate if you need a calibrated monitor. But for someone who likes what he sees on his monitor, does not print and has no real need for serious color accuracy or consistency I don't see why he needs to do anything at all.
Again, it's about consistency. The same set of RGB values you view today should appear the same in a year. Unless you edit them.
Your images are a big pile of RGB or CMYK numbers. The only reality to the numbers is the display. That's why calibration is necessary and more than just one time:
http://tinyurl.com/kdgutmz
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