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Author Topic: Sony A7's which one for architecture  (Read 4967 times)

Kaypee

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Sony A7's which one for architecture
« on: March 18, 2016, 12:08:16 pm »

I'm looking to add a Sony body and meta bones to my existing Canon kit to take advance of the better dynamic range.
I shoot architecture and will continue to use my tilt shifts and am hoping to do this without breaking the bank (my bank is a brittle one and prone to breaking!).

Is there a great deal of difference between the different models and is it advisable to land on one of the earlier models than the A7RII?
Also are there any good zooms for Sony that would allow the camera to double up for casual shooting.

Thanks
KP

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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2016, 03:17:52 am »

Hi,

The A7xII models are more solidly built. The A7, A7II and the A7rII have electronic first shutter curtain reducing vibrations. I would consider:

  • The original A7 - affordable
  • The A7II - a better version of the A7
  • The A7rII - in my view the best of the bunch


What I own is the A7rII, and I use it mostly with Canon lenses using the Metabones IV-T (?) adapter. The lenses I have are the 16-35/4L, 24/3.5 TSE LII, 24-105/4L, the Sony 90/2.8G and the Sony 70-400/4-5.6G lenses.

I also have the Sony 28-70 kit lens. I don't really feel the Sony lenses are that compelling, that is the reason I bought the Canon 24-105/4L.

On the A7rII AF works with most Canon lenses, sort of, it is accurate but not very fast. Sigma has a new adapter that has better support for Sony functions.

The A7rII has the best sensor and the best PDAF, but I understand that you are under a limited budget.

If you don't shoot in the 1/15s - 1/150s range, the A7r may be a very good option, too, especially if you get a used one. The shutter vibrations on the A7r are well documented but the camera will still deliver something like 24MP of resolution in the affected speed range.

Best regards
Erik

I'm looking to add a Sony body and meta bones to my existing Canon kit to take advance of the better dynamic range.
I shoot architecture and will continue to use my tilt shifts and am hoping to do this without breaking the bank (my bank is a brittle one and prone to breaking!).

Is there a great deal of difference between the different models and is it advisable to land on one of the earlier models than the A7RII?
Also are there any good zooms for Sony that would allow the camera to double up for casual shooting.

Thanks
KP
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Erik Kaffehr
 

Kaypee

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2016, 03:39:12 am »

Thank you Eric. That's very helpful. Primarily I shoot on a tripod and the exposure dictates the speed so I may well be in the range mentioned.

Can I ask how you find using the 24-105 on your Sony?
I have heard lot of bad reports about the ergonomics of the Sony's but on top of tripod based architecture work, having that sensor and a good zoom range would be great if it's ok to from a useability perspective.
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2016, 04:12:06 am »

Hi,

I just had the 24-105/4 for a few days but I like it. In my initial quick and dirty test it was better than my Sony 24-70/2.8 ZA.  Will post a few samples in the weekend.

Regarding ergonomics it is a mixed bag. You can reassign most functions and buttons, so I seldom go into the menu system. I can also program 12 quick choices on a single "function key". The great thing is that there are two presets, so I mostly just flip between my two presets.

The menu system is highly unlogical. If there is a system in the menu layout, it is beyond me. I seldom use the menu system.

The camera is small and that means buttons are a bit crowded.

Best regards
Erik


Thank you Eric. That's very helpful. Primarily I shoot on a tripod and the exposure dictates the speed so I may well be in the range mentioned.

Can I ask how you find using the 24-105 on your Sony?
I have heard lot of bad reports about the ergonomics of the Sony's but on top of tripod based architecture work, having that sensor and a good zoom range would be great if it's ok to from a useability perspective.
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Kaypee

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2016, 05:04:03 am »

Thanks Eric. Does the A7ii suffer from the shutter vibrations?
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Jose Viegas

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2016, 07:08:11 am »

Thanks Eric. Does the A7ii suffer from the shutter vibrations?

Both A7 and A7II have EFCS so no problem with shutter vibration.
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Rob C

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2016, 01:21:52 pm »

Both A7 and A7II have EFCS so no problem with shutter vibration.

Not that I'm buying anything, but don't EFCS's bring their own problems?

Rob C

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2016, 07:28:15 am »

A7r bodies are super cheap on the used market right now. I shoot architecture for a living and have yet to see the effects of shutter shock on 17,24,35,50 (shift) lenses with this body and a metabones adapter. I have recently moved up to an A7r2 and while it has a smidgen more resolution it's not 2k's worth of image improvement so for static tripod mounted use I think the A7r +Metabones would be an ideal addition to your kit for a very modest outlay.
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Kaypee

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2016, 09:58:22 am »

A7r bodies are super cheap on the used market right now. I shoot architecture for a living and have yet to see the effects of shutter shock on 17,24,35,50 (shift) lenses with this body and a metabones adapter. I have recently moved up to an A7r2 and while it has a smidgen more resolution it's not 2k's worth of image improvement so for static tripod mounted use I think the A7r +Metabones would be an ideal addition to your kit for a very modest outlay.
Thanks Shiftworker. Are you using the Siny as a walk around camera as well?
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Shiftworker

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2016, 10:06:14 am »

Thanks Shiftworker. Are you using the Siny as a walk around camera as well?
Yes as I have a 2nd A7r which I use with various MF lenses - my favourite is the Rokkor 40mm F2 from the Minolta / Leica CL cameras and it's a very compact setup.
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Kaypee

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2016, 10:25:54 am »

Yes as I have a 2nd A7r which I use with various MF lenses - my favourite is the Rokkor 40mm F2 from the Minolta / Leica CL cameras and it's a very compact setup.

Just had a look and they really, really cheap. I shoot arc for a living as well. Are you UK based?
I have been looking into the Sony's as it seems to be pretty much agreed it's an improvement on Canon (for arc work) but have been putting it off due to time researching and learning a new system. I had planned to do it in winter but it turned out a little busier than previous years.

I need to invest in a travel camera for personal work as well and am hoping the Sony can do both with a zoom.
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2016, 04:04:27 pm »

Hi,

Yes the A7r may be a good choice.

Regarding shutter vibrations, my understanding is that it reduces resolution to 24 MP level, or so. So an A7r image in the affected range resolves like an A7. The effect is clearly measurable but not obvious.

I have a HCam Master TS adapter for my Sony A7rII that allows full tilt and shift with many Canon, Hasselblad, Pentax and other lenses.

http://www.getdpi.com/forum/sony/56810-hcam-master-tsii-sony-a7rii.html?highlight=HCam+Master+TS

http://www.getdpi.com/forum/sony/57632-few-lenses-i-can-put-sony-a7rii.html?highlight=HCam+Master+TS

Best regards
Erik


A7r bodies are super cheap on the used market right now. I shoot architecture for a living and have yet to see the effects of shutter shock on 17,24,35,50 (shift) lenses with this body and a metabones adapter. I have recently moved up to an A7r2 and while it has a smidgen more resolution it's not 2k's worth of image improvement so for static tripod mounted use I think the A7r +Metabones would be an ideal addition to your kit for a very modest outlay.
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Kaypee

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2016, 05:25:52 pm »

Thanks Eric. The adapter looks interesting. I shoot with tse's and have shift adapters for my non tse's lenses but that wold open up a lot more options. From what I have read I need a metabones to get the tse to Sony mount.


Hi,

Yes the A7r may be a good choice.

Regarding shutter vibrations, my understanding is that it reduces resolution to 24 MP level, or so. So an A7r image in the affected range resolves like an A7. The effect is clearly measurable but not obvious.

I have a HCam Master TS adapter for my Sony A7rII that allows full tilt and shift with many Canon, Hasselblad, Pentax and other lenses.

http://www.getdpi.com/forum/sony/56810-hcam-master-tsii-sony-a7rii.html?highlight=HCam+Master+TS

http://www.getdpi.com/forum/sony/57632-few-lenses-i-can-put-sony-a7rii.html?highlight=HCam+Master+TS

Best regards
Erik
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stevesanacore

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2016, 11:56:10 am »

I'm looking to add a Sony body and meta bones to my existing Canon kit to take advance of the better dynamic range.
I shoot architecture and will continue to use my tilt shifts and am hoping to do this without breaking the bank (my bank is a brittle one and prone to breaking!).

Is there a great deal of difference between the different models and is it advisable to land on one of the earlier models than the A7RII?
Also are there any good zooms for Sony that would allow the camera to double up for casual shooting.

Thanks
KP

I went the same route over a year ago. I started with the A7R and added the A7R2. I use Canon, Nikon, Sony and even Leica R lenses with adapters. For my architectural work I usually stick with Canon TS-E lenses on the metabones IV adapter. A lot has been mentioned about vibration with the original A7R - but - I have never seen any evidence of it in my own work. My shots from my A7R were every bit as razor sharp as my A7R2 shots. The R2 is a much nicer camera and has more options, but the A7R makes a great back up for me. If you use traditional architectural photography procedures such as a heavy sturdy tripod and head, vibration shouldn't be an issue with the A7R.

Hope that helps.

Steve
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Kaypee

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2016, 12:14:45 pm »

I went the same route over a year ago. I started with the A7R and added the A7R2. I use Canon, Nikon, Sony and even Leica R lenses with adapters. For my architectural work I usually stick with Canon TS-E lenses on the metabones IV adapter. A lot has been mentioned about vibration with the original A7R - but - I have never seen any evidence of it in my own work. My shots from my A7R were every bit as razor sharp as my A7R2 shots. The R2 is a much nicer camera and has more options, but the A7R makes a great back up for me. If you use traditional architectural photography procedures such as a heavy sturdy tripod and head, vibration shouldn't be an issue with the A7R.

Hope that helps.

Steve

It does. Thanks.
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2016, 12:15:55 pm »

...If you use traditional architectural photography procedures such as a heavy sturdy tripod and head, vibration shouldn't be an issue with the A7R....

Apparently, it is a shutter-induced vibration, inside the camera, not something you can correct with a tripod.

Kaypee

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2016, 02:28:57 pm »

Apparently, it is a shutter-induced vibration, inside the camera, not something you can correct with a tripod.
There seems mixed opinions on this. From what I can gather most arc shooters who typically use heavy lenses and tripods don't seem to have an issue. Fingers crossed.
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2016, 04:59:11 pm »

Hi,

Jim Kasson has written a lot about this. Here is a good starting point: http://blog.kasson.com/?m=20140329

My take is that the problem is certainly there, but hard to observe.

Best regards
Erik

There seems mixed opinions on this. From what I can gather most arc shooters who typically use heavy lenses and tripods don't seem to have an issue. Fingers crossed.
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qwz

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2016, 01:12:06 am »

If not a a7r-ii than a7r - except you want a hand-held.
But i use around a year A7r with 135, 85, 50, 35, 24mm, 24mm shift lens and 12-24 zoom. Handheld as well as tripod. In some (many) cases i wish for IBIS of second A7 series cams.
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stevesanacore

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Re: Sony A7's which one for architecture
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2016, 07:36:20 am »

Apparently, it is a shutter-induced vibration, inside the camera, not something you can correct with a tripod.

Yes, I have no doubt there is a problem with vibration from the shutter on the A7R. I only know that if you're aware of it and use techniques to minimize it, (as we've always done shooting with older film MF cameras), it shouldn't be an issue. Coming from MF and 4x5, most of the architectural guys, (like me), already have very HD tripods and heads which are overkill for Canon's and Nikon's, let alone the little Sony. But the heavy Canon TS-E Shift lenses and the sturdy mount on the Metabones Adapters seems to work very well in dampening the issue. Now that I've switched to the A7R2, I've downsized my gear head and tripod a bit to match. However, using the A7R on a tripod mounted to the body with a lens hanging off the front may be much more problematic. Personally I think Sony and Zeiss should put a tripod collar on all their heavy lenses to move the CG forward to offset that tiny lightweight body on a tripod.
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