Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Why hue and saturation shift with DXO Optics?  (Read 3014 times)

r010159

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 86
Why hue and saturation shift with DXO Optics?
« on: December 13, 2015, 10:46:47 pm »

I read an evaluation of DXO Optics Pro compared with LR. The author took a severely underexposed image and increased exposure adjustment to recover highlights. There ended up being a substantial hue shift of the sky from blue to a very saturated violet. Has anyone had this problem? It seems the user needs to both tame saturation and correct for shift in hue where working with extreme changes in exposure correction. This will not work if I ETTR and then try to recover the original highlights.

Is this true? Can this happen?

By the way, I am so far very impressed with DXO Optics Pro. It meets my minimum requirements for a RAW processor. But since exposure changes actual exposure accurately, and the same for contrast, and other parameters, unlike one RAW processor that will remain nameless, some parameters have naturally overlapping effects. So there is a learning curve to this software. But it seems that it may be worthwhile.

Bob

« Last Edit: December 14, 2015, 01:15:43 am by r010159 »
Logged

kirkt

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 585
Re: Why hue and saturation shift with DXO Optics?
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2015, 10:50:01 am »

... The author took a severely underexposed image and increased exposure adjustment to recover highlights. There ended up being a substantial hue shift of the sky from blue to a very saturated violet. ...

I'm not sure I understand - do you mean a severely OVERexposed image, or "increased exposure adjustment to recover shadows"?

Can you post the link to the article you were reading?

kirk
Logged

AlterEgo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1995
Re: Why hue and saturation shift with DXO Optics?
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2015, 10:53:52 am »

The author took a severely underexposed image and increased exposure adjustment to recover highlights.

underexposed + increased exposure + to recover highlights ? am I missing something in this line...
Logged

AlterEgo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1995
Re: Why hue and saturation shift with DXO Optics?
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2015, 11:02:03 am »

hue shift

possibly operations in improper color space and/or color profiles with 3D luts for color transforms introducing shifts based on exposure adjustments
Logged

r010159

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 86
Re: Why hue and saturation shift with DXO Optics?
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2015, 01:02:37 am »

underexposed + increased exposure + to recover highlights ? am I missing something in this line...

Shadow recovery, not highlights. Almost all of the original image appeared black. So due to it recovering the entire image, including the highlights, I erroneously considered it as the recovery of highlights. I just was not thinking.

Bob
Logged

xpatUSA

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 385
    • Blog
Re: Why hue and saturation shift with DXO Optics?
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2015, 11:16:05 pm »

I read an evaluation of DXO Optics Pro compared with LR. The author took a severely underexposed image and increased exposure adjustment to recover highlights. There ended up being a substantial hue shift of the sky from blue to a very saturated violet. Has anyone had this problem? It seems the user needs to both tame saturation and correct for shift in hue where working with extreme changes in exposure correction. This will not work if I ETTR and then try to recover the original highlights.

Is this true? Can this happen?

Bob

If by "violet" we could say instead "magenta" then this article, while not specific to this thread, may be of interest:

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.guillermoluijk.com%2Ftutorial%2Fsatlevel%2Findex.htm&langpair=es|en&hl=EN&ie=UTF-8

I'd say that, with such a drastic adjustment, the blue got clipped while the red continued to rise thereby giving an apparent hue shift.
Logged
best regards,

Ted
Pages: [1]   Go Up