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Author Topic: how do you do that?  (Read 4823 times)

herbert6

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how do you do that?
« on: April 08, 2006, 12:10:19 am »

have canon 100-400 lens, always use lens hood - want to attach 77mm threaded rotating polarizing filter to lens.
with lens hood on, how does one rotate the rotating filter while looking through the view finder?????
a - shoot w/filter, no lens hood?
b - cut slot in bottom of hood large enough to stick finger in and rotate filter?
c - is there a special hood that will allow this?
d - always have filter rotater person along to do chore while i focus/compose, etc.?
« Last Edit: April 08, 2006, 12:11:46 am by herbert6 »
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macgyver

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how do you do that?
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2006, 01:23:24 am »

e. trial and error?
« Last Edit: April 08, 2006, 01:23:55 am by macgyver »
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BernardLanguillier

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how do you do that?
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2006, 01:37:04 am »

Not perfect by any means, but what I do is:

[no hood on]
- focus/frame
- adjust polarization
- take test image
- check result on screen
- modify polarization if needed
- put the hood on
[hood on]
- shoot final image

Cheers,
Bernard

Lisa Nikodym

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how do you do that?
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2006, 10:20:16 am »

I do something similar to what Bernard does.  I take off the hood, slip it over my wrist like a bracelet as a temporary storage method, do whatever I need to do to set up the shot (including rotating the polarizer), then put the hood back on just before I take the final shot.

On rare occasions when I get impatient I try to rotate the polarizer with the hood on (my fingers are small), and then clean the fingerprints off the polarizer that evening.  

Lisa
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francois

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how do you do that?
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2006, 01:37:09 pm »

When I'm lazy I rotate the whole camera body/lens until I find the desired polarization. Then I hold the filter with my left hand and return the camera body in the "right" position and refine framing.
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Francois

kbolin

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how do you do that?
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2006, 04:01:41 pm »

I'd be inclinde to choose option:

b - cut slot in bottom of hood large enough to stick finger in and rotate filter?

That seems so simple and if the hole is on the bottom of the lens hood... who cares... oh... right it could be on the side for portrait shots.  

Ok... so maybe I'll stick to what I currently do... hood off... compose... hood on (if necessary) and shoot.

Kelly
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herbert6

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how do you do that?
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2006, 07:43:05 pm »

Quote
I'd be inclinde to choose option:

b - cut slot in bottom of hood large enough to stick finger in and rotate filter?

That seems so simple and if the hole is on the bottom of the lens hood... who cares... oh... right it could be on the side for portrait shots. 

Ok... so maybe I'll stick to what I currently do... hood off... compose... hood on (if necessary) and shoot.

Kelly
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=62169\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

thanks much for all the replies - will probably go with cutting a slot in bottom of lens to be able to rotate the filter - maybe i'll market a flip-lens--------------herbert6
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phox

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how do you do that?
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2006, 01:32:13 am »

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DiaAzul

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how do you do that?
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2006, 06:42:54 am »

You may want to consider whether you need to use both a lens hood and a polariser at the same time.

I lens hood is most effective when there is a point light source (the sun) close to the optical axis of the lens and just out of frame. The amount of just out of frame that has an impact on image quality will depend on the point source of light and the lens. However, if the sun is directly ahead of you then a polarising filter is likely to have little impact on the image (there are cases where it will in the case of reflections from leaves/ water, but this can be assessed on a case by case basis).

A polariser to deepen the sky colour works most effectively when the sun is approximately 45-90 degrees to the optical axis of the lens. In this situation the polariser is effective but the lens hood may not be necessary as the risk of flare is low.

So, the question in cases where you need a lens hood is the polariser actually going to do anything? And where you are using the polariser to maximum effect then is the lens hood adding any value to image quality?
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pobrien3

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how do you do that?
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2006, 07:03:39 am »

I have to disagree with that: the lens hood is useful for preventing oblique light striking the front element as well, not just when the source is close to the lens axis.  Try to watch a TV with sunlight catching the screen obliquely to see what I mean.  The polariser will help with that, but I's still use the lens hood.  There's a significant school of though that the hoods that come with the lenses are too short to be properly effective, but I'm not about to open that one up...!
Peter
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phox

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how do you do that?
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2006, 03:13:46 pm »

Quote
I have to disagree with that: the lens hood is useful for preventing oblique light striking the front element as well, not just when the source is close to the lens axis.  Try to watch a TV with sunlight catching the screen obliquely to see what I mean.  The polariser will help with that, but I's still use the lens hood.  There's a significant school of though that the hoods that come with the lenses are too short to be properly effective, but I'm not about to open that one up...!
Peter
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You're right.  People who think flare is the only issue need to think a bit more or test things out with and without.  Whether or not you have *annoying* image degradation (flare) due to a strong point source, you still lose contrast due to this extra light striking the front element of your lens.
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Caer

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how do you do that?
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2006, 05:02:20 pm »

Pentax has the right idea:



-Andy
c a e r p h o t o
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gkramer

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how do you do that?
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2006, 01:24:23 pm »

Forget the Canon hood, and buy a generic 77mm rubber hood for zooms (collapses to different extensions for various zooms lengths), which screws into the 77mm thread on front of the the polarizer filter. Then you can adjust the polarizer by rotating the hood. Works fine on all my 77mm Nikon lenses (except the widest).
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Phuong

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how do you do that?
« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2006, 02:11:19 pm »

what i do is, when i'm sure on a particular photosession that i'll have to use CPL, i'll bring a third party screw in hood instead of Canon's genuin hood. these hoods screw right in your lens thread just like a filter. they also have a front thread just in case you want to put yet another filter in front of it or want to snap your lens cap on. they can also be collapsed to smaller size so they dont take so much spaces as well.

do a search with "collapsible hood" or "rubber hood" on eBay will give you 597608755976 of them to choose from with all sizes of lens thread.
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