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Author Topic: Drones  (Read 28532 times)

TwistedShadow

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Re: Drones
« Reply #20 on: December 13, 2015, 03:04:21 pm »

Check carefully as you are dealing the Federal Law Enforcement.
Some locations, such as the State of North Dakota - are free fly zones for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles - drones. A lot of that is University of North Dakota having one of the top UAV programs in the nation - and Grand Forks Air Force Base next door which is helping them.
Check carefully so you don't get a surprise visit from law enforcement.

DJI who is one of the more popular quad chopter manufactures is starting to install built in no-fly zone maps into their drones. This will prevent their drones from entering into no fly zones. This is monitored through the built in GPS guidance programing. I think this is a step in the right direction to help prevent issues we're seeing with drones around airports.
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TwistedShadow

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Re: Drones
« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2015, 01:17:47 pm »

Update:

FAA issued new small UAV or Drone rules.

https://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84384

Starting December 21st, all Drones bought on or after this date is required to register their drones with the FAA. Drones bought prior to December 21st has until February 19, 2016 to register.

Now these new rules are more to do with Registration than they are about rules. I mean the only real change is the fact that you have to register your drone, whether it be a toy, hobby, or commercial drone. They so far have still failed to make revisions to the rules that would streamline the use for commercial drones. You can apply to the FAA for a Special Airwrothiness certificate or Waver Certificate. The original plan by Congress was to make rules that would streamline the use of commercial drones but that mission was hijacked by the folks miss using drones and the hysteria it created with people.

So for now, we're back at square one with the original rules stating you can't use drones for commercial use...barring a special certificate from the FAA.
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MattBurt

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Re: Drones
« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2015, 01:35:02 pm »

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Kevin Gallagher

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Re: Drones
« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2015, 01:38:59 pm »

Whoa!  :o
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJu4kmcy8gQ

 That was not good, it appears to be something a lot heavier than the usual 2 pounder and most certainly have caused a great deal of damage.
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Kevin In CT
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Kevin Gallagher

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Re: Drones
« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2015, 02:06:35 pm »

Update:

FAA issued new small UAV or Drone rules.

https://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=84384

Starting December 21st, all Drones bought on or after this date is required to register their drones with the FAA. Drones bought prior to December 21st has until February 19, 2016 to register.

Now these new rules are more to do with Registration than they are about rules. I mean the only real change is the fact that you have to register your drone, whether it be a toy, hobby, or commercial drone. They so far have still failed to make revisions to the rules that would streamline the use for commercial drones. You can apply to the FAA for a Special Airwrothiness certificate or Waver Certificate. The original plan by Congress was to make rules that would streamline the use of commercial drones but that mission was hijacked by the folks miss using drones and the hysteria it created with people.

So for now, we're back at square one with the original rules stating you can't use drones for commercial use...barring a special certificate from the FAA.

 Actually, the registration requirement is for units weighing 1/2 pound or more. This effectively eliminates the registration of the "toy" class of aircraft. The bad news is that it applies to all model aircraft; fixed wing, rotary wing, and multi rotor craft. The Part 333 exemption process for commercial use is a bit intimidating at first but there is no charge for the exemption per se from the FAA. If you know where to look you will finds folks that will prepare your application for darn near free and walk you through the application process. Like anything else in life there are those that are looking to make a quick buck on this and will charge multi thousands of dollars to "prepare" your application. You should be aware that a pilot's license is not necessary to apply for and be granted the exemption, it is only necessary for the person flying the drone (PIC in FAA terms).
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Kevin In CT
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MattBurt

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Re: Drones
« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2015, 02:21:41 pm »

That was not good, it appears to be something a lot heavier than the usual 2 pounder and most certainly have caused a great deal of damage.

They say it was filming for tv broadcast. I wonder what impact this could have on regulation? Would have been bad if it hit him, even if he was ok because it would have disrupted his run.
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TwistedShadow

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Re: Drones
« Reply #26 on: December 23, 2015, 11:47:22 pm »

Actually, the registration requirement is for units weighing 1/2 pound or more. This effectively eliminates the registration of the "toy" class of aircraft. The bad news is that it applies to all model aircraft; fixed wing, rotary wing, and multi rotor craft. The Part 333 exemption process for commercial use is a bit intimidating at first but there is no charge for the exemption per se from the FAA. If you know where to look you will finds folks that will prepare your application for darn near free and walk you through the application process. Like anything else in life there are those that are looking to make a quick buck on this and will charge multi thousands of dollars to "prepare" your application. You should be aware that a pilot's license is not necessary to apply for and be granted the exemption, it is only necessary for the person flying the drone (PIC in FAA terms).

Toy is a relative term...the difference between a boy and a man is the price of their toys? It does exclude the chap walmart toys but it does target the entire hobby community. This new ruling actually contradicts the FAA's section 336 rules which exempts model aircraft from such rules as registration.

Anyhow, as mentioned above, you can apply to the FAA for a Special Airworthiness Certificate or a Waver Certificate in order to use your drones for commercial use.
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TwistedShadow

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Re: Drones
« Reply #27 on: February 03, 2016, 07:15:20 pm »

I'm finally getting around to applying for my Section 333 Exemption.

First off, if you plan on using your drone for commercial use, you can to register your drone the old fashion way, using official FAA forms and the US mail. The online registration is for hobbyist only. The FAA does mention they plan to launch an online commercial registration mid year. It's more in-depth is one reason in terms of information you must give the FAA is the possible reason as to why it will be a while. You have to prove the drone has never been registered outside the U.S. for example...a paper receipt works.

Second of all, the FAA doesn't require the person applying for the Section 333 Exemption to be a certified pilot. A non pilot can apply and receive one. BUT, The FAA does require the drone operated to be a certified pilot. There is at this time no way around this one folks. If you don't have a license, either hire someone who does or get one your self...hot air ballon pilot's license seems to be a popular choice due to low cost and speedy certification.

Now with that said, the FAA is hinting at a UAV specific license. This only makes sense, I don't know about you but I don't see my self working for peanuts videoing homes for real estate agents when I could make $60-100k with a pilots license. So if you're interested in using drones for commercial use, I would go ahead and apply for your 333 Exemption since it can take up to 120 days for approval. Who knows, the FAA could introduce an attainable UAV license in that time.


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