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Author Topic: Winter Equestrian Geometry  (Read 3837 times)

Tim Gray

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« on: February 07, 2006, 07:26:16 pm »

Michael, looks like your last 2 (digital) front page shots have been with the R1.  Any update thoughts since your review?  What role does it play for you - it's a bit big for a pocket camera...
« Last Edit: February 07, 2006, 07:26:47 pm by Tim Gray »
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michael

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2006, 08:50:30 pm »

The Sony R1 has become my favourite "casual" camera.

I've been out shooting with medium format for the past few days, but took the R1 is a casual backup. At the end of the day, so to speak, my best shot was with the R1 not my Cambo and P25.

Image quality is excellent, I like the handling, the lens is excellent, and the price is right.

It's not a pocket camera, it's simply a viable alternative to a DLSR.

Michael
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Kenneth Sky

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2006, 08:43:14 am »

Michael
Did the R-1 pass the "MR glove" test. I know it's been a relatively mild winter here in TO but the conditions you shot in seemed to require gloves. Have you noticed any leakage of humidity? The example I handled at the Sony store didn't seem to have tight fit & finish.
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michael

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2006, 09:55:04 am »

Works fine with gloves, though I wish the manual focus button was a bit more proud of its surround collar.

I have now shot in heavy snow with the R1 at least twice, most recently earlier this week, when I was walking through a forest and a gust of wind caused a huge clump of snow from an overhead branch to land on me. The R1 was around my neck and got completely covered in wet heavy snow.

I shook it off and continued to shoot with it for the rest of the day.

The snow down my collar was another story. Brrr.

Michael
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Lin Evans

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2006, 10:26:08 am »

Quote
The Sony R1 has become my favourite "casual" camera.

snip.....

Image quality is excellent, I like the handling, the lens is excellent, and the price is right.

It's not a pocket camera, it's simply a viable alternative to a DLSR.

Michael
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I'll second this!  It's a really useful tool and has become one of my favorites also. I'm having fun with it not only as a casual camera but as a very convenient tool for stills and for shooting small art objects. Some of the features such as the EVF enabled "zebra" save me lots of time for hotspot prevention. What I formerly had to do with bracketing on my dSLR's I can accomplish "before" snapping the shutter with the R1. I frequently use a dark, black backdrop for shadow elimination and for subject contrast. This, of course, tends to throw off the metering and invite overexposure. With the zebra feature I immediately can see potential hotspots and quickly tweak the exposure compensation before shooting.

I've found the image quality to be quite comparable at lower ISO's with my dSLR's and the lens is "very" good. I've put up a small gallery of images from the R1 here:

[a href=\"http://www.lin-evans.net/sonyr1/sonyr1.html]http://www.lin-evans.net/sonyr1/sonyr1.html[/url]

Lin
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Lin

rlh1138

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2006, 01:40:09 am »

Lin,

A question you might know the answer to, about locking exposure on the R1. If I press the AE lock, it doesn't seem to 'hold' past the next exposure.  That is, it unlocks again.  I'm reading the manual, such as it is, but not finding what I want.  Is there a way to lock the exposure until I unlock it, or is it meant to be just for the next shot?  I've been noting the exposure I want, then switching to manual, then dialing in that exposure - but then I find myself in manual mode when I don't want to be, etc.  Funny how spoiled we can get, but...  

Thanks

Ray
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michael

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2006, 08:58:25 am »

It only holds till the next exposure. That's the way AE lock works on most cameras.

Why not let yourself become comfortable with Manual? I use it almost all the time in combination with the live histogram and find it an ideal way of working.

Michael
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rlh1138

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Winter Equestrian Geometry
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2006, 12:53:44 pm »

Michael,

Thanks for the reply - and the suggestion.  I think I'll try that - I remember a long time ago having two Nikkormat bodies, some lenses and a hand held meter, and somehow that all worked.       I'm really liking the R1 - I'm just a casual photographer whose gotten into digital over the past few years, and this camera is the closest to my OM1 of the three digital cameras I've had so far.

And thanks again for this site - I learned a lot here.

Ray
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