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Author Topic: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang  (Read 11658 times)

dreed

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A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« on: May 07, 2015, 09:16:10 am »

Great read and great photography! Very timely.

btw, the more international mix of stories is quite refreshing from the usual North American bias (albeit that's understandable.)

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Paulo Bizarro

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2015, 12:03:00 pm »

Highly enjoyable read, with great photos.

Lloyd Mayeda

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2015, 06:07:02 am »

Thank you for the informative article, "great" and "enjoyable" as noted in above replies.
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2015, 09:08:42 am »

I agree with all the above comments. A great read with beautiful photos.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes (visit my website: http://myrvaagnes.com)

francois

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2015, 09:24:02 am »

Very interesting article and gorgeous images. Thank you for sharing your outstanding work.
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Francois

paulbk

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2015, 09:42:58 pm »

Loved it. Good job!

Nepal is such an interesting and beautiful place. But life looks hard in Nepal. I'm always amazed at the warmth and verve of people who live in such difficult circumstances.
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paul b.k.
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bokehcambodia

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2015, 03:39:39 am »

+1
I have a friend currently travelling there when the quake stroke.
I hope LuLa will continue to post quality content and less fillers.
Preferred the pace of the old page more, though.

Great read and great photography! Very timely.
btw, the more international mix of stories is quite refreshing from the usual North American bias (albeit that's understandable.)

Kevin Raber

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2015, 11:47:50 am »

We have been trying to include content from more international authors.  If anyone is interested in doing an article contribution they can contact me from the link at the bottom of the home page.  The last few months have been busy on the new site design, Video page etc. as well as workshop announcements.  Now that just about all the workshops through 2016 have been announced we can get back to some of the other material we have in progress.

Kevin Raber
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Kevin Raber
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Robert DeCandido PhD

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2015, 06:29:58 pm »

photos from Janakpur, Nepal - December 2013:

http://photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=1062969
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Ray

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2015, 03:59:33 am »

As a frequent traveller to Nepal, I'm terribly saddened at the earth quake devastation. Sometimes I wish I'd been there when the quake occurred so I could offer any help I was capable of.

I've got hundreds of photos of Nepal, but the photo I think might be most relevant in the circumstances, is of the Peace Pagoda in Pokhara, the construction of which was basically inspired by Mahatma Ghandi.

It also happens that the city of Pokhara is situated on solid rock foundations, and was relatively unaffected by the quake, even though it was approximately the same distance from the epicentre as Kathmandu.

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Ray

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2015, 11:48:21 pm »

A few more of the Peace Pagoda in Pokhara, Nepal. I believe this temple was not damaged by the recent earthquake, although I'm not certain.


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Ann JS

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2015, 12:09:43 am »

I posted this photo-essay: "Nepal: a Tribute to What Once Was . . ."  on another site a couple of weeks ago when the first of those two devastating earthquakes hit Nepal and made me realise how fortunate I was to have been able to record some of its architectural treasures and its traditional ways of life before they were obliterated.

I shot these photographs on 120 Kodacolor (color negative) film in 1972 and they have suddenly taken on a certain historical significance because they show structures and a way of life which no longer exist.

If anyone would like to see the photographs, the story is here:

http://www.fotozones.com/live/index.php/topic/58919-nepal-a-tribute-to-what-once-was/

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Ray

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Re: A Trek to the Forbidden Kingdom of Mustang
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2015, 08:05:45 am »

Interesting shots, Ann. I first visited Nepal in November 1964 with a Pentax Spotmatic and a couple of rolls of Kodachrome 64 film.
In November 2005, I revisited the country with a Canon 5D. Whilst in Pokhara, I made an attempt to locate the same street where I'd taken a Kodachrome slide shot of the view from my hotel window, 41 years ago, just to see how much change had taken place.

I definitely located the right street, but my shot with the 5D is from a closer perspective and taken from a lower position. Nevertheless, the changes that have taken place are considerable, as you can appreciate in the image below.

Regrettably, such changes reduce the photographic appeal of the scene.  ;)

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