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Author Topic: Lake Eyre, South Australia  (Read 1552 times)

Marlyn

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Lake Eyre, South Australia
« on: April 15, 2009, 09:18:50 AM »

Lake Eyre is a huge salt lake in Central Australia, and on the rare occasion that is fills (or even has water in it), the largest lake in Australia.
This was shot last week during a camping trip to the region.  The Water from queensland floods had only made it down to this end of the lake a couple of days prior.



Shot on a 1DsIII,  90mm TS-E Lens.  7 Shot stitch with PTGUI.

100% Crop from the image can also be found here:  LakeEyreSunrise-100Crop

Comments welcome.  (This is destined for a 60"x20" print)

Regards

Mark.

PS: I Hope to have some more shots later in the week after processing, and some when the film comes back form the lab!
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John R

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Lake Eyre, South Australia
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2009, 11:58:57 AM »

Just superb. I need some of that light in this dingy basement. I think the wide format works well in this image because the beach? or reflecting area has a lot of visual interest and nicely balances the power of the sun.

JMR
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MR.FEESH

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Lake Eyre, South Australia
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2009, 02:54:13 PM »

Woooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooow.
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Lake Eyre, South Australia
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2009, 03:46:08 PM »

Very pretty.  The water looks like mercury, or some other molten metal.  Excellent.

John
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Marlyn

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Lake Eyre, South Australia
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2009, 06:33:29 PM »

Thanks for the comments !

The "reflecting area" is the surface of the salt lake.  The water was approx 50mm deep at most,  and the features are little mounds of salt crystals which have not yet been covered.  (See the 100% crop)  I think the layer of salt just under the water added to the 'mirror' effect.  
The darker patch comming in from the left is actually just more lake that is slightly higher than the middle, so hasn't yet been covered with water.

It also helps that the lake does in fact stretch to the horrizon and edge to edge (and beyond).  One of the wierd features of standing in lake Eyre is you can see a full horizzon, and the curvature of the earth. (Similar to being at sea).

Regards

Mark.

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