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Author Topic: Sending an HD video file to an HD projector  (Read 1047 times)

deanwork

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Sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« on: July 10, 2017, 02:56:19 PM »

Hi,  having a one person show of still photography and the show will involve  using two digital projectors that project either video or still sequenced imagery onto windows very large inside the gallery.

The videos were put together in Final Cut Pro and saved as Adobe 422 HD files. Each file is now in a Quicktime movie format and the file sizes for each are about 7 gigs in HD resolution. Both of these are on a continuous loop, thus the Quicktime format.

I've never done this before, as an addition to my still work so I'm researching the production mechanism.

One of these projectors is an Epson and one is a BenQ both with 1900 resolution.

What I'm wondering is what is the best way to send these files to the projectors. Right now one is on a MacBook Pro and the other is loaded onto a big flast drive stick.

Am I going to need two lap tops to drive these using an HDMI connection, or is there some other device I could use to run the projectors that would be smaller and cheeper but still process HD?

One of the videos has sound and the other does not. One is 20 minutes long and one is 12 minutes long.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I just went to Best Buy to look at a wireless Epson projector and ask questions  but no one in the store had a clue.

John
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 02:59:43 PM by deanwork »
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deanwork

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sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2017, 03:00:44 PM »

Hi,  having a one person show of still photography and the show will involve  using two digital projectors that project either video or still sequenced imagery onto windows very large inside the gallery.

The videos were put together in Final Cut Pro and saved as Adobe 422 HD files. Each file is now in a Quicktime movie format and the file sizes for each are about 7 gigs in HD resolution. Both of these are on a continuous loop, thus the Quicktime format.

I've never done this before, as an addition to my still work so I'm researching the production mechanism.

One of these projectors is an Epson and one is a BenQ both with 1900 resolution.

What I'm wondering is what is the best way to send these files to the projectors. Right now one is on a MacBook Pro and the other is loaded onto a big flast drive stick.

Am I going to need two lap tops to drive these using an HDMI connection, or is there some other device I could use to run the projectors that would be smaller and cheeper but still process HD?

One of the videos has sound and the other does not. One is 20 minutes long and one is 12 minutes long.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I just went to Best Buy to look at a wireless Epson projector and ask questions  but no one in the store had a clue.

John
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TommyWeir

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Re: sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2017, 04:54:21 PM »

Those are ProRes 422 HD files.  Overkill for your requirements, the additional data won't matter.  You can convert those down to a smaller format, I'd suggest the Apple Devices 1080P preset in your FCP Share dialog.   That should be fine on your full HD projectors.

You can find numerous devices which will play your files continuously for an exhibition, your projectors may even support it directly depending on the model.  See if they have a USB port.  Plug in your files on a USB stick and check out if the projector has a play and loop setting in it. 

Alternatively, Western Digital have a media player to hook your USB stick to but there are others:  https://www.cnet.com/uk/products/western-digital-wd-tv-media-player-2014/review/

The issue lies with if you have to sync the two projections.  If you do, then you need a more professional solution, these involve a networked pair of players which have to be set up using a PC generally and are a non-trivial task. 

Joe Towner

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Re: Sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2017, 06:42:35 PM »

So I've done this a few different ways.  Last time I had a loop going with an Apple TV connected to the Apple iPhoto account and it pulled stills from that and rotated them just perfectly.  Now, I'd suggest an Intel Compute Stick or two and load your files on via MicroSD.  https://www.amazon.com/Intel-Compute-Computer-Processor-BOXSTK1AW32SC/dp/B01AZC4NHS/  The question is if the projectors are directly tied to the audio system, or if you need to provide an audio cable connection.

422 for a projector, seems highly wasted as the projectors can't display that quality of output?

I'm not sure you should concern yourself with making the still slideshow into a video - unless that's where the audio is to come from.  There are a number of slideshow applications that can run on the stick, and would allow for easier re-ordering/adding/removing of images.
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deanwork

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Re: Sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2017, 06:58:21 PM »

Thank you Joe.

That stick sounds very interesting. I will look into that.  I would it that for the video. So can I plug it directly into the projector without the use of a lap top?

One video is with sound and music synchronized and actual hd video content, the other is just a hd quicktime movie that I have created of a  dissolving group of jpegs sequenced. The stills have no sound.

Yea I think these files of several gigs are too big saving in that format.

How would you suggest compressing it and what should I save it as in order to maintain the resolution and use the 1920 res projector to its best advantage?

John


So I've done this a few different ways.  Last time I had a loop going with an Apple TV connected to the Apple iPhoto account and it pulled stills from that and rotated them just perfectly.  Now, I'd suggest an Intel Compute Stick or two and load your files on via MicroSD.  https://www.amazon.com/Intel-Compute-Computer-Processor-BOXSTK1AW32SC/dp/B01AZC4NHS/  The question is if the projectors are directly tied to the audio system, or if you need to provide an audio cable connection.

422 for a projector, seems highly wasted as the projectors can't display that quality of output?

I'm not sure you should concern yourself with making the still slideshow into a video - unless that's where the audio is to come from.  There are a number of slideshow applications that can run on the stick, and would allow for easier re-ordering/adding/removing of images.
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deanwork

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Re: sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2017, 07:00:40 PM »

That was very helpful Tommy. No I don't need to sync the projectors. The one that is a slide show of still pics that are to be blown up really big, the size of the gallery, has no sound but does need to loop.

Thanks again,

John


Those are ProRes 422 HD files.  Overkill for your requirements, the additional data won't matter.  You can convert those down to a smaller format, I'd suggest the Apple Devices 1080P preset in your FCP Share dialog.   That should be fine on your full HD projectors.

You can find numerous devices which will play your files continuously for an exhibition, your projectors may even support it directly depending on the model.  See if they have a USB port.  Plug in your files on a USB stick and check out if the projector has a play and loop setting in it. 

Alternatively, Western Digital have a media player to hook your USB stick to but there are others:  https://www.cnet.com/uk/products/western-digital-wd-tv-media-player-2014/review/

The issue lies with if you have to sync the two projections.  If you do, then you need a more professional solution, these involve a networked pair of players which have to be set up using a PC generally and are a non-trivial task.
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Joe Towner

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Re: sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2017, 07:22:12 PM »

Here I was thinking I posted my reply.  Short version:

Done it a few different ways, Apple TV works well, as does the latest Intel Compute Stick though it runs Windows 10.  Don't discount this as if you can get onto wifi there and use something like Logmein or teamviewer to remotely update/resolve issues it's a nice addition.

I'd go as far as saying don't turn the slideshow into a video, it's easier to add/move/delete from a slideshow that just loops.

-Joe
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Pete Berry

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Re: Sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2017, 07:48:56 PM »

John, the question I have is whether the HD projector has the computing config. & power to read and run smoothly the dense 4:2:2 1080p video file. Unless you can establish it before the event, I'd sure bring a laptop proven to run it from the hard disc, and a long HDMI cable!

Pete

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TommyWeir

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Re: sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2017, 01:49:07 AM »

I think itís probably best for extended runs such as an exhibition to get things as minimal as possible. Connections to the web or PC/MAC driving things are not a really viable solution given the duration of a show, the range of people responsible for the daily start of the show etc.  Best to establish a Ďturn it all on and away it runsí option.   An AppleTV will need a source, either a playlist which loops on iTunes running on a computer or the equivalent on Vimeo say where you set up a video which repeats the video over for the daily duration of the show.  This introduces some fragility however, online access and the daily start being more complex.  A player is more robust and straightforward.

Be aware you can set up a Keynote presentation to show your images and videos, title cards etc  and itís very controllable.  It can export a fully configurable video as well, full HD even ProRes 4444.  A lot of filmmakers use it for title sequences and cut them into their FCP projects.

Joe Towner

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Re: sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2017, 02:47:38 PM »

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Joe Towner

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Re: Sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2017, 02:57:14 PM »

That stick sounds very interesting. I will look into that.  I would it that for the video. So can I plug it directly into the projector without the use of a lap top?

Yep, it's a full on computer, just cut down to the basics.  Bring a wireless keyboard & mouse combo and it just runs like any other pc.  What's the setup like - are the projectors hanging from the ceiling and a pain to get to or tucked into a nice cabinet that you can easily access?
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Chris Sanderson

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Re: Sending an HD video file to an HD projector
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2017, 09:56:12 PM »

Two cross-posted topics have been merged...
@deanwork - please do not cross post

Chris
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Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape
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