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Author Topic: Lessons from the Hudson River School  (Read 8533 times)

Paulo Bizarro

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Lessons from the Hudson River School
« on: April 20, 2015, 03:49:49 am »

Thanks for a very good and inspirational article.

Anders_HK

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2015, 06:55:37 am »

Thanks for a very nice article  :). It aligns much with my own experience that as photographers we can learn from the painted arts.

I do not paint but I read some books on painting a few years back to see what I could learn for my digital processing. It helped me to gain comprehension for how to better emulate an appearance of light for the RAW converted image during processing to create:
1) A pleasing transition into highlights similar to films,
2) A visual perception of there being light in a picture, and additionally on the
3) Emphasise and de-emphasise of colors for leading an eye and in creating what appears a more pleasing image.

I find in particular the works by the Hudson River Painters inspirational for landscapes. Merced River, Yosemite Valley / Albert Bierstadt in your article is an awesome example of emulation of beautiful light  :)

Anders
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francois

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2015, 07:26:09 am »

It's a really good article and the posted paintings are jaw-dropping, especially the Merced River!
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Francois

Ken Bennett

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2015, 08:00:31 am »

I enjoyed the article.

Our art museum specializes in American art and has several strong pieces, among them this Frederic Church painting. I can stand and stare at it for hours. I'm almost embarrassed to post the web link as the tiny digital file is so unlike the real thing.

They also have a huge Thomas Cole and a Bierstadt, among many others. If you're ever in central North Carolina, the Reynolda House museum is worth a visit.
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2015, 11:08:46 am »

Excellent article.

It also supports what Russ Lewis (RSL) has often said about landscape photography and painting.
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Rick Popham

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2015, 04:37:48 pm »

I've long admired the way these "Hudson River" painters lit their paintings.  By odd coincidence, I just came back from the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, MA, where I saw Bierstadts's "Puget Sound on the Pacific Coast".  The painting is on loan from the Seattle Art Museum -- the result of a friendly wager on the result of the Super Bowl in February.

http://www.clarkart.edu/
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Alan Smallbone

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2015, 05:27:42 pm »

The Los Angeles County Art Museum, (LACMA) has an exhibition on until June 7, called "Nature and the American Landscape: The Hudson River School".

Alan
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Nelsonretreat

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2015, 04:51:24 pm »

The most illuminating quote for me in the article was,

"Unlike painters, we can not create the light needed for a particular image. Instead, we must wait for nature to cooperate and provide light that inspires us in some way. Cultivating patience, perseverance, and a developed awareness of light and its many qualities is an essential skill that always pays dividends."

This sentence captures the essence of what many photographers believe is important in what they do. Other writers on this site seem to believe that the light is added on the computer later to suit their 'vision' of what the scene should have looked like.

I love that you have let the landscape speak for itself and eschewed HDR techniques to even out the light. Your use of dark and shade is beautiful

Your images are truly masterful and to add a bonus you have not placed yourself as the 'artist' at the centre of the story. You let your craft with the camera in the field speak for itself and it is obvious you didn't need to spend hours reworking these images to 'create your vision'
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Isaac

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2015, 01:57:29 pm »

Other writers on this site seem to believe that the light is added on the computer later to suit their 'vision' of what the scene should have looked like.

Someone else might just as easily claim Mr Rodriguez seems to believe that the light is [removed] on the computer later to suit his 'vision' of what the scene should have looked like -- "I darkened the background in post to emphasize this…" (Flowers at Bowtie, UT).


I love that you have let the landscape speak for itself … you have not placed yourself as the 'artist' at the centre of the story.

Is it really the landscape speaking for itself when the "2 minute exposure helps to create smooth tones in the water, and an ethereal feeling in the sky" or is the artist at the centre of the story lifting "the viewer from the literal to the emotional." (Cape Breton Is, Nova Scotia)
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amolitor

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2015, 06:55:56 pm »

The discussion of what's going on in the paintings is frankly rather thin. These are quite formal constructs and the author seems to be unaware of most of that stuff, talking about the usual things photographers tell one another: vague handwaving about leading lines and The Light! The Light!

The photographs attached, interestingly, lack almost all of the formalisms on display in the paintings.

I don't know if the author has simply chosen to jettison the formal aspects and take away only certain lessons, or if the author is actually unaware of the formalisms.

Eta: these guys were 19th century, not 18th. The given dates are fine, but the 1800s are not the '18th century' but the 19th.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2015, 07:33:31 pm by amolitor »
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Nelsonretreat

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2015, 07:39:28 pm »

Wow.. An object lesson in how to dismiss someone's article with condescension and discourtesy. I'm a newbie here and am surprised at the manners ( or more appropriately Lack of manners) displayed by some of the forum members.
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amolitor

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2015, 07:48:41 pm »

I state facts and I defy you, with respect, to demonstrate otherwise. A quick read Ruskin or Robinson's precis of same will pull aside the blinds and show you a ton of structure in the paintings, much of which is either lacking or exists only weakly in the photos. These guys had a very distinctive play book. It was a pretty good one, although it's very dated by now.

It is not my job, nor is it anyone's, to silently accept failings and lacunae. Indeed, my remarks ought to serve as an invitation to the author of the piece to expand on his, to explain why he feels it wise to borrow one lesson and decline another.

There may well be excellent reasons for dispensing with antiquated ideas of composition and I, for one, would like to hear them.
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Isaac

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2015, 08:55:13 pm »

A quick read Ruskin or Robinson's precis of same will pull aside the blinds and show you a ton of structure in the paintings, much of which is either lacking or exists only weakly in the photos.

Please provide a link to said précis (or a title).
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stamper

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2015, 07:50:31 am »

Wow.. An object lesson in how to dismiss someone's article with condescension and discourtesy. I'm a newbie here and am surprised at the manners ( or more appropriately Lack of manners) displayed by some of the forum members.

amolitor's post is very mild compared with other posts on here. If this disturbs you then you won't be lingering for long. ;) ;D

stamper

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2015, 07:53:16 am »

Am I correct in stating that if someone, like myself, isn't interested in painting or looking at art then their progress with respect to photography will be hampered? :-\

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2015, 10:27:46 am »

Am I correct in stating that if someone, like myself, isn't interested in painting or looking at art then their progress with respect to photography will be hampered? :-\
No.
For some photographers a knowledge of art and art history may indeed help to improve their work, but for many others it will make no difference. And for a few, getting hung up on trying to imitate painters can be a definite hindrance.

If one has no sense of personal vision, studying art may help to provide inspiration, or it may hinder.

IMHO, Stamper, you have a very strong sense of visual purpose, so please don't spoil it by visiting any museums.   ;)

Cheers,

Eric
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2015, 12:20:58 pm »

Am I correct in stating that if someone, like myself, isn't interested in painting or looking at art then their progress with respect to photography will be hampered? :-\

Yes.

Jeremy Roussak

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2015, 12:48:38 pm »

Am I correct in stating that if someone, like myself, isn't interested in painting or looking at art then their progress with respect to photography will be hampered? :-\

No.

Yes.

And there you have it: question answered. If only life were always so easy.

Jeremy
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stamper

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2015, 12:51:46 pm »

Yes.

Your interest in painting and art hasn't helped you much in your photographic career..has it? ;)

stamper

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Re: Lessons from the Hudson River School
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2015, 12:53:25 pm »

And there you have it: question answered. If only life were always so easy.

Jeremy

Jeremy I suggest that you should definitely take an interest.  ;) :D
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