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Author Topic: Land Rover Defender 110  (Read 30018 times)

Colorado David

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2015, 10:22:58 am »

Overheating prevention is a known issue with Land Rover owners.  Most people run an Ultra Gauge off of the OBDII port to keep better track of vital signs than what is provided by the instrument cluster.  The Discovery II temperature gauge was programed by engineers at BMW and does little to indicate real operating temperatures.  It's just something that you have to keep up with.  Another known issue is the non-serviceable u-joints on the front propshaft.  They were designed so owners wouldn't have to worry about them and they were to be replaced at intervals by the dealer.  Most owners don't give them another thought and then they fail.  My front propshaft has been rebuilt with serviceable u-joints that are greased at every oil change.

This has turned out to be a strange thread for a photography site.

armand

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2015, 10:28:11 am »

It is quite difficult to justify the Diesel proposition now.
I got a Diesel engine in the summer but with the gas prices down the differential between gas and diesel is huge.
In the summer the diesel was roughly 10 cents more expensive than premium, now it's 30-40% more! Now that's kind of ridiculous. Not to mention the regular gas is even cheaper.

brentward

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Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2015, 12:46:32 pm »

Another vote for the AEV rubicon. Mine is a 2012 jk350. Excuse the iphone quality Instagram images, but here's a pic.

http://instagram.com/p/xF-xOyhf51/
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bcooter

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #43 on: January 05, 2015, 05:26:24 pm »



This has turned out to be a strange thread for a photography site.

I think it's great.

It's the first thread in a long time that hasn't mentioned DR, Nikon D800, DXO, a chart and a science test.

It's actually about using equipment in the real world.

IMO

BC
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Justinr

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #44 on: January 05, 2015, 05:38:30 pm »

I think it's great.

It's the first thread in a long time that hasn't mentioned DR, Nikon D800, DXO, a chart and a science test.

It's actually about using equipment in the real world.

IMO

BC

Now you've just gone and spoiled it!

 ;D
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Justinr

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #45 on: January 05, 2015, 05:56:14 pm »

The newer models, LR3 and LR4, have a much better V8 engine.  The older 4.0 and 4.6 V8 engines were an old Buick designed engine that Land Rover licensed from GM.  They are an aluminum block with sleeves and aluminum heads.  They are prone to damage from overheating (as are all aluminum blocks) and you simply must pay attention to regular maintenance.  I wouldn't be the least bit worried about an LR4.  For me, an important factor is being able to sleep in the back.  My Series II Discovery is just a bit short for me even with the back passenger seats removed.  I've thought a lot about getting one of the Autohome roof top tents.

The original 3.5 litre V8 that eventually got bored/stroked out to 4.6l (even 5l by TVR)  was a real trooper of an engine, almost as old as the Land Rover itself. Designed by Buick in the fifties, Rover adopted it in the sixties and since it has powered a multitude of vehicles from the 1967 Rover P5 to the 2004 Discovery via the Defender and even a Leyland truck. There are not many motors with that sort of legacy and it must be considered one of the great engines of automotive history, despite its perceived faults in a much more modern world.

More here -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rover_V8_engine
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allegretto

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #46 on: January 06, 2015, 12:01:07 am »

IMHO the Defender 90 was the jewel of the line... not the 110

The First Gen Porsche Cayenne was a massively competent off-roader as well. Porsche, in their typical Germanic interpretation decide that if you wanted an ATV then they would make the BEST one. it's what they do.

These guys never play at design.
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Colorado David

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #47 on: January 06, 2015, 01:24:35 am »

I think it's great.

It's the first thread in a long time that hasn't mentioned DR, Nikon D800, DXO, a chart and a science test.

It's actually about using equipment in the real world.

IMO

BC

It does honor that regular Lula brand loyalty/bashing though.  Toyota vs. Land Rover.

I think I mentioned one important feature of a nature photography vehicle is being able to sleep in it.  My Series II Discovery is a little short for comfortable camping in the back, but I've done it.  I have removed the rear passenger seats (the third row seats have been in the garage since I bought the vehicle) and can just fit.  I put bags and cases on the roof rack while I sleep in the back.  I don't like to drive with a lot of weight up there, but it is a good storage place and I've shot from there on occasion. I like the security of sleeping inside, especially in bear country, and like to be able to wake up at the location where I want to shoot in the morning.  I replaced the back door inside panel with a stainless steel panel I bought from Columbia Overland.  It is cut as an exact replacement for the panel.  I've added a drop down panel to it that serves as a small table for cooking and brewing tea.  The Land Rover Discovery II has been probably the most cost effective vehicle I've owned.  It does not get very good gas mileage, but when I factor what I paid for it used, the cost of gasoline, and maintenance, it is way cheaper than anything else I've owned.  I do keep up with maintenance and do the work myself rather than depending on a dealer or an indie shop.  Another of the Land Rover jokes; Land Rover: Proudly turning owners into mechanic for 65 years. ;D

« Last Edit: January 06, 2015, 01:40:20 am by Colorado David »
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Alto

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #48 on: January 06, 2015, 05:29:07 am »

Hi All

Well Im another LULAist with a Land Rover 110 V8 i bought it in 91 it has 210K miles on it and is part of the family now you can stand on it to take pictures you it gets your kit and you safely home and is a bit different .
Not for everyone but it suits me .
« Last Edit: January 06, 2015, 10:46:56 am by Alto »
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Justinr

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #49 on: January 06, 2015, 08:12:44 am »

Here's an item I put together for a classic tractor column I do.

http://www.inkplusimages.com/Landrover.pdf
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allegretto

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #50 on: January 06, 2015, 04:40:23 pm »

how cool!

classic tractors

Torque is so intoxicating.


Here's an item I put together for a classic tractor column I do.

http://www.inkplusimages.com/Landrover.pdf
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David Anderson

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #51 on: January 06, 2015, 07:22:58 pm »


The First Gen Porsche Cayenne was a massively competent off-roader as well. Porsche, in their typical Germanic interpretation decide that if you wanted an ATV then they would make the BEST one. it's what they do.


Yep, not bad for a Volkswagen, but never seen one anywhere near off-road.. ;D
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Justinr

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #52 on: January 07, 2015, 05:27:47 am »

how cool!

classic tractors

Torque is so intoxicating.



Despite the many concerns over a Land Rovers reliability that forty year old model is quite fixable with all parts being readily available off the shelf at reasonable cost. I'm not sure that the same will apply to a Porsche in 2055. But anyway, glad you are into classic machines as well, they are the most visited pages on my site - http://www.inkplusimages.com/zenstock/Heritage-Agriculture./  and I must get some more up there.
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Petrus

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #53 on: January 07, 2015, 06:07:16 am »

Porsche Cayenne also sits a the top of the reliability charts at least in Germany. I suppose it would be quite capable off-roader (Merc ML with off-road package is also, but reliability is so-so, being USA made) if owners were so inclined. Nobody buys it for off-roading, but if that has really be taken into account in the design, it explains some of the reliability. Reliability charts in Europe seem to be led by mostly Japanese, with Toyota/Lexus on top of those, then Porsche and Skoda. Here in Finland top three positions for 3 years and older cars, in 8 age groups were 11 Toyotas, 11 other Japanese and 2 non-Japanese…

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2179067/Land-Rover-revealed-UKs-reliable-car-71-cent-years-old-break-year.html
http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/cars/article-2186477/Top-reliable-reliable-cars.html
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Justinr

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #54 on: January 07, 2015, 12:59:28 pm »

Just a thought on the question of reliability. If a 4wd drive is purchased for its pose value rather than any serious intent to go off road isn't likely to prove more reliable than one which is bought primarily to go off road and suffer a harder life as a consequence?
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Petrus

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #55 on: January 07, 2015, 01:29:31 pm »

Just a thought on the question of reliability. If a 4wd drive is purchased for its pose value rather than any serious intent to go off road isn't likely to prove more reliable than one which is bought primarily to go off road and suffer a harder life as a consequence?

Could well be, but do people actually drive Discovery 3 and 4 mostly off-road in Britain, as they are the worst in reliability? I would think more Land Cruisers are taken off-road (top of the charts) than much more plush Discoveries.

All large (specially diesel) cars suffer in these reliability comparisons, as they are driven on the average much more per year, typically twice as much or more. Especially Mercedes E-series are hurt by this in Finland, as they are the most common taxicabs, driven a lot per annum.
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Gandalf

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #56 on: January 07, 2015, 03:23:43 pm »

If you are serious about this question, defendersource.com is your best bet for answers. Just be aware the natives are restless and cannibalistic of newbies. Figure out what you really need/want in a vehicle. If it can only be satisfied by D110, go and get one. If you just like the feel and concept of one, consider an older Range Rover. They kind of feel like a D90 with leather seats (same suspension, similar weight, 10" longer wheelbase). Before you commit to buying/building/importing a 110, spend some time traveling in one. They are unparalleled in many respects, but they are not without their issues and they are criminally overpriced in the US. Of course, I would take one in a heartbeat if I could afford one, but my focus would be on making it comfortable, not on making it capable. They are plenty capable with minimal modifications, but the reality is that most travels are more pavement than dirt. It is quite possible that the gas trucks are more comfortable than the diesel trucks.

Colorado David's comment about fuel consumption on the gas engines is also worth noting. They burn a lot of fuel. This means you are paying out the nose to drive a Land Rover, but also (again, this is a gas comment, not diesel) if you are venturing into the backcountry, you are using a lot of payload and cargo space to carry extra fuel.

I don't know if you have given any consideration to a LR3 or LR4, but they are very nice vehicles and IMO worthy of the Land Rover name. On a recent trip shooting for an off road RV company, we opted to take the LR3 over the D1 or RRC because there would be a lot of miles on pavement or high speed (for a Land Rover) dirt roads. I had some reservations about this decision initially, but it very quickly proved to be the right choice (of course part of the decision was that we could shoot out the back of the LR3, but not the D1).

Make no mistake, if I had the ability to buy and send a D110 (NAS or ROW) to ECR, I would do it in a heartbeat, but since that is not in the cards, I will stay with the RRC. If you are just looking for a beat up old truck, take a look at the Tithonus 110. They can be had for $25,000 or less (shipped), but IMO they are more of a starting point than an end point.
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Brent Daniels

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #57 on: January 07, 2015, 08:35:51 pm »

A friends husband here in Toronto Canada had a rebuilt tricked out Defender 110 built and imported this past summer. He was very happy with it. So happy she sometimes thinks he loves it more than her. It was not cheap as he sold his almost new Porsche Cayenne to get the Defender.

Here are the guys he got it through. They seem to do quite a few exports to the USA. Very nice stuff.

http://us3.campaign-archive2.com/?u=14b7574a480b3ac96da3565bd&id=a4aab6e420

http://www.arkonik.com/

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Petrus

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #58 on: January 08, 2015, 01:28:03 am »

It was not cheap as he sold his almost new Porsche Cayenne to get the Defender.


This really shows how the free markets work, or in this case, not so free. But everything has its price and value: when I sold my well kept 6 years old 110 (with nice add-ons) I got about 1/3 of what the cheapest Cayenne cost here...
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Justinr

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Re: Land Rover Defender 110
« Reply #59 on: January 08, 2015, 04:30:24 am »

Could well be, but do people actually drive Discovery 3 and 4 mostly off-road in Britain, as they are the worst in reliability? I would think more Land Cruisers are taken off-road (top of the charts) than much more plush Discoveries.

All large (specially diesel) cars suffer in these reliability comparisons, as they are driven on the average much more per year, typically twice as much or more. Especially Mercedes E-series are hurt by this in Finland, as they are the most common taxicabs, driven a lot per annum.

Living in Ireland for the last eight years I may be a little out of touch with the UK scene but it is quite true that a lot of 4WD's purchased would hardly have encountered a cow pat, let alone suffer the terrors of a muddy puddle. The posh side of London was a well known haunt of such vehicles, earning them the generic title of Chelsea Tractors. They were also a $%*&**! nuisance during the rush hour as the MILFS transported their precious ones two hundred yards down the road to school in them, they were, in short, lifestyle statements and stick on transfers looking like mud splashes were even available just to give the impression of a wild existence outside of the M25.

On the other hand, out in the country, many were used to take Penelope and her pony to the local gymkhana and some, If I may suggest that such are extant, were purchased by better off farmers and land owners who would indeed find them useful for checking out the peasants and shooting the pheasants.

Land Rovers, being of British origin and manufacture, obviously had a strong appeal amongst the patriotic, a factor that Land Rover never openly exploited but hardly discouraged either. Magazines devoted to the make were never shy of flying the flag and there were constant references to being 'made in Britain'  amongst those advertising their modifications and attachments within the pages. All this stacked up in the company's favour, as you can imagine, and there was quite an interesting period of about 12-15 years ago when off roading moved from being a pastime of the rednecks to gaining some sort of respectability amongst the monied, who were keen to express their wealth in new and different ways. This progression up market was reflected in the ballooning sales of 4wd's of every make.

So I guess you are right, the majority of all car style 4wd's were unlikely to suffer the rigours of being away from terra firma to any great extent, but my feeling is that of those that did then Land Rovers would make up the larger proportion, in the UK at least. In Ireland (Eire), Land Rovers suffered the unfortunate association with the army and police forces in the north and so never gained great popularity down here where all 4WD's, of any type, are simply referred to as Jeeps.

While on the subject of reliability there is the curious case of engine failure in a certain age of Discovery ascribed to the the drive gear on the oil pump falling off. This was well known and discussed at the time, but you try and find any reference to it on the web now.


Anybody looking to compare prices this is the de facto site for car sales in Ireland -

http://cars.donedeal.ie/find/cars/for-sale/Ireland/?filters[make]=Land+Rover&source=all
« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 05:18:06 am by Justinr »
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