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Author Topic: Question for Nikon D810 shooters  (Read 27123 times)

dwswager

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Re: Question for Nikon D810 shooters
« Reply #80 on: January 11, 2015, 11:18:10 am »

Is there a review/comparison of RAW converters based on conversions from the D8x0 cameras?

I would love to see a listing of the demonstrated strengths and weaknesses of each converter.  Of course, some tangible evidence would need to be shown.  It would be helpful for each of us to then look at our most likely conversion scenarios and match the needs to the converter that has strengths that benefit that type of scenario. 

Unless you are willing to become proficient (not just know how to use it) with 2 or 3 converters, I think most people would be best served by becoming proficient with a single converter.  Of course, in that case, you certainly want to to pick the one with strengths (and not weaknesses) that play to your type of photography.
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Hans Kruse

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Re: Question for Nikon D810 shooters
« Reply #81 on: January 11, 2015, 01:49:43 pm »

Thanks Hans.  I have the trial of latest Lightroom version downloaded and installed, but have not used it yet.  I intend to try using Lightroom again as it is probably a better tool for my use than Photoshop.  I still struggle with the whole "OK, am I impacting the real file or just the database entry Lightroom is keeping" thing.  It's the same struggle I have with helping my kid's with their iPhones.  Compared to selecting  10GB of music on my server and dragging to my Android phone, having to import to a iTunes library, then using special software to move it to the phone, then having it want to back it all up again.

Understand :) But this is just until it is natural for you. All the pictures you have edited using ACR will be included into the LR database when you import folders with raw and xmp files. You can also get xmp files built from the edits you do in LR by turning on xmp write in the catalog settings.

ErikKaffehr

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Re: Question for Nikon D810 shooters
« Reply #82 on: January 14, 2015, 05:05:55 pm »

Hi,

LR and ACR share the raw engine. I don't know if ACR gives access to all functions in Lightroom, but it is the same converter at should give similar results.

Personally, I feel the demosaic part is lacking a bit. This is mostly a non issue, but it generates more and worse artefacts on my P45+ than say Capture One. Far less problems on the Sony. Hope they work over the demosaic part in the next version.

Here is a page showing demosaic errors in a few raw converters:

Raw TherapeCapture One 7.2
LR 5.6Accu Raw
http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/Articles/RawConverters/Mosaic/Aliasing_NS_200_percent.jpg

This one is an example of colour reproduction of greens and violets

http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/Articles/OLS_OnColor/SimpleCase/

The raw images are here: http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/Articles/OLS_OnColor/SimpleCase/Data/

This was from a P45+, so it is very different from the Nikon D810. Just to say, there are differences.

Personally I stay with LR 5, as it offers a very good workflow and excellent integration with Photoshop. The main problem area I have seen is haloing around sharp contours on the P45+ and demosaic errors. So, if I have a problem image I will resort to one of the other converters, Accuraw or RawTherapee in my case.

Best regards
Erik



Is there a review/comparison of RAW converters based on conversions from the D8x0 cameras?

I would love to see a listing of the demonstrated strengths and weaknesses of each converter.  Of course, some tangible evidence would need to be shown.  It would be helpful for each of us to then look at our most likely conversion scenarios and match the needs to the converter that has strengths that benefit that type of scenario. 

Unless you are willing to become proficient (not just know how to use it) with 2 or 3 converters, I think most people would be best served by becoming proficient with a single converter.  Of course, in that case, you certainly want to to pick the one with strengths (and not weaknesses) that play to your type of photography.
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Erik Kaffehr
 
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