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Author Topic: Winter weight gloves  (Read 5326 times)

NancyP

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2014, 09:53:20 pm »

Whatever the temperature, it is good to have workable gloves. Even in the warm South, some people with medical conditions may have problems when the temperature is well above freezing. Cryoglobulinemia, Raynaud's syndrome, Raynaud's-like problems (I have this last, with a single finger with an anomalous vascular supply). I will put in a plug for the traditional kerosene hand warmers and the modern chemical pack hand-warmers. There are also some very expensive gloves with a rechargeable power source and resistive wiring in the insulation (electric blanket for your hand) - I haven't seen these, and they seem a bit fussy, but if I were working in an Arctic winter, I might try them.
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kitalight

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2014, 08:56:44 am »

Golf gloves....inside mittens when not actually shooting.
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dwswager

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2014, 05:20:34 pm »

Thinking of giving these a try (List looks like $49, but on sale Amazon for $29): 

POW Photog Gloves

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Colorado David

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2014, 11:05:54 pm »

I work in cold weather quite a lot.  Furthermore, I might spend a long time outside in not-as-cold weather but with winds.  Long exposure to winds can be as chilling as shorter exposure to more bitterly cold temperatures.  I use merino wool gloves.  They are fairly thin and a very fine weave for dexterity.  I buy them at a backpacking/mountaineering store.  They are not cheep.  I buy a few pair at a time for around $30 U.S. per pair.  I am a big fan of merino wool and have several suits of long underwear in different weights that I can layer up.  I also use the iron particle hand warmers such as Hot Hands.  They last about 8 hours of continual use, but can be put in a ziploc bag and squeeze all the air out and you can reuse them later.  They are pretty cheep for the warmth you get from them.  I try to keep my hands protected from the wind when I can.  I'll usually put a Hot Hands pack in the palm of each hand inside my wool gloves.

joneil

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2014, 09:32:23 am »

One word of advice on good gloves - living here in Canada, where we get a wee bit of cold winters form time to time.  :)   Try them on IN PERSON.   Seriously.   Think of gloves like shoes. I cannot buy shoes over the internet, I have to try them in person.  I find, it makes a huge different for gloves too.  Not say that you cannot get good gloves over the internet, but how they fit your hand, how they feel in person really varies a lot.  

  The shape of each person's hands varies, and what is "large" for one company might be a "medium" for somebody else.  Or your hand might be extra wide or extra narrow.  This is why i have always found, try them in person if at all possible, whatever you buy.  

good luck
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dwswager

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2014, 11:21:32 am »

I have been using "Aqua Tech Sensory Gloves" for the past three years.  Have photographed both above the Arctic Circle and in Antarctica.  The gloves have been fantastic.  When I first got them, I thought they were too thin and would never work but with a thin pair of silk liners - no problem.

I bought them from 'Outdoor Photo Gear' who are based in Louisville, KY.  You can get them on-line from them.

Brian

Put a pair of these on the Christmas List for my wife to get from my Mother in law.  Adorama had them for $39.95 ($10 cheaper than most places) with free shipping.  Size on these are measured from tip of middle finger to the wrist.  Aquatech recommends the smaller size if you are between measurements.

AquaTech Sensory Gloves, Size: Extra Large, 9-9.5" - Black/Moss

SENSORY GLOVE SIZING CHART:
When the measurement is between sizes, choose the smaller size.
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Jay Kaplan

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #26 on: December 09, 2014, 01:09:14 pm »

Take a look at The Heat Company gloves, they are expensive but the Heat 3 smart gloves are designed for photographers. They are also expensive too at $200.00 US. http://www.theheatcompany.com/en/gloves
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NancyP

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #27 on: December 09, 2014, 04:04:39 pm »

Many mitten shells have a pocket for a chemical hand warmer over the fingers.
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Colorado David

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #28 on: December 10, 2014, 12:27:54 am »

Take a look at The Heat Company gloves, they are expensive but the Heat 3 smart gloves are designed for photographers. They are also expensive too at $200.00 US. http://www.theheatcompany.com/en/gloves

I got that email yesterday too.  I followed the link to look until I came to the price.

dwswager

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Re: Winter weight gloves
« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2014, 10:15:10 am »

Take a look at The Heat Company gloves, they are expensive but the Heat 3 smart gloves are designed for photographers. They are also expensive too at $200.00 US. http://www.theheatcompany.com/en/gloves

If it's that freaking cold, I would recommend the heated jackets or vests and regular gloves.
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