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Author Topic: Pentax 645z Astrophotography Using the iOptron SkyTracker  (Read 22305 times)

NancyP

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Re: Pentax 645z Astrophotography Using the iOptron SkyTracker
« Reply #60 on: October 28, 2014, 10:28:18 am »

The phone app runs in red mode, where all text and images are dark red on black, and I have a red bulb on my headlamp also. I see a fuzzy something where Andromeda ought to be if I look slightly to the side of where it should be.
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Alan Smallbone

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Re: Pentax 645z Astrophotography Using the iOptron SkyTracker
« Reply #61 on: October 28, 2014, 10:49:25 am »

Bright red light can affect your night vision, but averted viewing like you are doing does help. As we get older the pupils shrink a bit so it makes it harder to see things at night then when we were younger.

Alan
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Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA

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Re: Pentax 645z Astrophotography Using the iOptron SkyTracker
« Reply #62 on: October 28, 2014, 04:32:35 pm »

In my mid 20s, when I lived in areas with good seeing, I could find the Andromeda galaxy quite easily on clear nights after getting acclimated to the dark. More recently, though, I've needed electronic help. A few weeks ago I spotted it from my driveway, light pollution & all, via an Olympus E-M1 EVF and Voigtländer 42.5/0.95 (at ~f/1.2). A very pleasant surprise! At 14x mag. with stabilization I could make out more structure than with my 10x50 binocs.

-Dave-
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NancyP

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Re: Pentax 645z Astrophotography Using the iOptron SkyTracker
« Reply #63 on: October 28, 2014, 05:31:32 pm »

" As we get older the pupils shrink a bit so it makes it harder to see things at night then when we were younger."
I resemble that comment!   :D  That's probably why the standard 7 x 35 or 8 x 42 binoculars are "good enough" for me for astronomical observing, assuming my pupils reach ~5 mm dilation.
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