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Author Topic: 24mm hyperfocal distance at f16 - how to mark?  (Read 5709 times)

Hans Kruse

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Re: 24mm hyperfocal distance at f16 - how to mark?
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2014, 11:36:46 am »

Bearing in mind that "depth of field" actually means "range in which image quality is not unacceptably degraded," since everything except the actual point of focus is out of focus to some degree, shooting film back when I found that the depth of field scales engraved on the lenses were not sufficiently conservative for me.  I imagine it is even worse with digital files.  Rather than rely on DOF calculators, I would do some testing to establish the parameters that work for one's own needs.  (And it see how what one sees in live view matches up to the printed output.)

I speak from experience, not theory :) Live view is a good way to judge DOF, but as I have mentioned earlier on. I often do take some extra shots at different apertures and then judge in Lightroom which one looks the best. Sometimes I prefer a shot where the main subject is in sharp focus and the background slightly blurred. I'm not suggesting DOF calculators as the main tool at all, I think DOF calculators are great for getting a good feel for DOF at different focal lengths and apertures and in a given situation it is useful, however I would always in a challenging situation use live view and aperture bracket my shots.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: 24mm hyperfocal distance at f16 - how to mark?
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2014, 01:06:06 pm »

... shooting film back when I found that the depth of field scales engraved on the lenses were not sufficiently conservative for me...

That's why I used to use the next markings on the lens, i.e., if shooting at say f/16 (relax you diffraction freaks, that was medium format I am talking about ;)) I would use the markings for f/11.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2014, 02:30:35 pm by Slobodan Blagojevic »
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nma

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Re: 24mm hyperfocal distance at f16 - how to mark?
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2014, 02:28:46 pm »

I speak from experience, not theory :) Live view is a good way to judge DOF, but as I have mentioned earlier on. I often do take some extra shots at different apertures and then judge in Lightroom which one looks the best. Sometimes I prefer a shot where the main subject is in sharp focus and the background slightly blurred. I'm not suggesting DOF calculators as the main tool at all, I think DOF calculators are great for getting a good feel for DOF at different focal lengths and apertures and in a given situation it is useful, however I would always in a challenging situation use live view and aperture bracket my shots.

A lot of useful thought have been expressed, so forgive a little redundancy and read on. When I acquired my Canon 5Dii, I thought that live view was there to satisfy the point and shoot crowd, only to find how valuable it was for focusing landscape images. If you want to make large prints and have the scene believable, the foreground has to be in really sharp focus. As others have said, it is not crucial that focus be maintained to infinity. Some print viewers feel that sharp focus at infinity is unnatural. I feel that hyperfocal distance techniques are, for the most part, obsolete and less than adequate. Using live view, 5x or 10x viewing, and DOF preview, you can often get adequate depth of focus at f8 (full frame).  However, the best results are obtained with focus stacking because you can control exactly what will be in focus and use an optimal aperture setting, like 5.6 or 8, to keep diffraction in check. Did I mention a tripod?
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Paulo Bizarro

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Re: 24mm hyperfocal distance at f16 - how to mark?
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2014, 04:06:29 am »

I don't DOF scales are useful anyway. With modern cameras they are all redundant. As I have mentioned several times earlier on, the best way to judge DOF is using live view.

Very instructing thread, and my take is that we are blessed today with technology that is really helpful. I only mentioned DOF scales on the lens, because I think they are still helpful, in tandem with LV and DOF preview. I am always using DOF scale on the lens and DOF preview, not so much LV. Why? Because I have checked and trust the scale on my lens, to give me the necessary DOF for a landscape shot.

All the best.
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