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Author Topic: Valagjá  (Read 1403 times)

Rajan Parrikar

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Valagjá
« on: June 16, 2014, 01:25:00 pm »

Volcanic fissure in the Highlands of Iceland.  More in the blog post.

Paulo Bizarro

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Re: Valagjá
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2014, 04:00:12 am »

I really like the small splash of green in the bottom, in contrast with the ochre and reddish hills. In terms of composition, I find the I would like to see a bit more sky at the top, so the mountains have more room to breathe.

Rajan Parrikar

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Re: Valagjá
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2014, 12:01:34 pm »

I really like the small splash of green in the bottom, in contrast with the ochre and reddish hills. In terms of composition, I find the I would like to see a bit more sky at the top, so the mountains have more room to breathe.

Paulo,

Totally agree about some more sky.  However, this was taken in a raging wind storm where I could be out only for a brief moment.  Forget keeping the camera steady, even I had to seek support to stay anchored.  That splash of green I noticed only after I got back and reviewed the capture on my screen.

Isaac

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Re: Valagjá
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2014, 12:18:23 pm »

That splash of green…

One of the charms of photography :-)

"It frequently happens… -- and this is one of the charms of photography -- that the operator himself discovers on examination, perhaps long afterwards, that he has depicted many things he had no notion of at the time." The Pencil of Nature, 1844
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luxborealis

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Re: Valagjá
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2014, 07:36:22 pm »

Rajan,
You always seem to capture scenes and compositions I might have passed by, yet you find the magic in them. The subtle curves of the landscape, the contrast of the rich black volcanic rock with the red. You've allowed one to flow into the other, whereas I probably would have cropped to the red more tightly. Nicely done, wind storm, or not.
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Terry McDonald - luxBorealis.com
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