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Author Topic: Why I Bought the a7R  (Read 21668 times)

MrSmith

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Re: Why I Bought the a7R
« Reply #60 on: February 18, 2014, 02:00:56 pm »

Those are circles of confusion.
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Graham Clark

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Re: Why I Bought the a7R
« Reply #61 on: February 23, 2014, 05:52:54 pm »

Graham:
striking images. What are the green "orbs"?

-h

Those are LED lights being spun around by someone, turned off, he moves, then turns them back on and spins again.
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Graham Clark  |  grahamclarkphoto.com

Graham Clark

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Re: Why I Bought the a7R
« Reply #62 on: February 23, 2014, 05:56:14 pm »

Just shot Chinatown in San Francisco with the A7R and a few 1960's lenses. For the first time, photographers can actually see in black and white. Combine that with manually focusing with focus peaking, and street photographers have a pretty magnificent tool for capturing the decisive moment.

In fact, it could be one of the biggest advancements for street photographers since fast, accurate and silent autofocus. Combine that with a massive resolution range on a small body. I think that's especially important to street photographers because now you can zoom in to ridiculous details, text, expressions on faces, all sorts of little things that in 50 years from now will seem fascinating.



Sure, EVFís have existed on cameras before, but the A7Rís is the best one Iíve seen so far for a couple reasons:
ē Really high resolution, canít detect pixels
ē Focus peaking combined with EVF is amazing. Sure, you can view it on the LCD but having your eye so close to a hi-res screen is really key when in harsh lighting
ē Image playback inside the EVF means you donít have to pull away from your viewfinder. Your eyes adjust to the viewfinder and you donít have to compete with environmental light
ē The exposure compensation dial changes actually reflect in real-time in the EVF. So now you can see in black and white, but you can also see the exposure changes through the viewfinder
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