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Author Topic: Michael Reichmann, ETTR and Oly OMD EM5  (Read 50768 times)

Vladimirovich

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Re: Michael Reichmann, ETTR and Oly OMD EM5
« Reply #80 on: September 12, 2013, 05:24:34 PM »

Thanks for the clarification. What I meant to say was, when shooting EM5 at max ISO 400 and using ETTR, I will have more highlight headroom than shooting at ISO800 or ISO1600, with the benefit of reducing shadow noise on the RAW files. Is this understanding correct?

yes... but practically w/ Sony sensor in EM5 (beyond the tests, which are correct indeed) I doubt that you need to bother w/ ISO400 - just stay at lowest ISO and use maximum exposure (time and aperture) possible in your situation and that 's it... real life scene w/ real life converters - you will not notice that gain in shadows.
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digitalphotographer

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Re: Michael Reichmann, ETTR and Oly OMD EM5
« Reply #81 on: September 12, 2013, 05:49:02 PM »

yes... but practically w/ Sony sensor in EM5 (beyond the tests, which are correct indeed) I doubt that you need to bother w/ ISO400 - just stay at lowest ISO and use maximum exposure (time and aperture) possible in your situation and that 's it... real life scene w/ real life converters - you will not notice that gain in shadows.

I know this is a thread about EM5, but recently I also acquired an RX1R as a second camera, would you also suggest shooting at base ISO for the 24MB FF too? Or is RX1R resembling the D800 more, ie going "ISOless" at higher range?
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Vladimirovich

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Re: Michael Reichmann, ETTR and Oly OMD EM5
« Reply #82 on: September 12, 2013, 06:08:52 PM »

I know this is a thread about EM5, but recently I also acquired an RX1R as a second camera, would you also suggest shooting at base ISO for the 24MB FF too? Or is RX1R resembling the D800 more, ie going "ISOless" at higher range?
see the graphs of DxOMark tests... like w/ EM5 the tests will suggest to go one stop higher (if you do not risk to clip anything important to you)... will you see the end result (which is indeed there, test numbers wise) ? try yourself
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BJL

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Re: highlight blinkies are over-cautious for raw, especially with the E-M5
« Reply #83 on: March 19, 2018, 02:36:42 PM »

Sorry to dig up this old discussion, but the topic is active again in other threads, so maybe this one is worth bringing to peope's attention.

As I have mentioned in numerous times, Japanese camera makers are more or less required by their industry association CIPA to use ISO Standard Output Sensitivity as the primary method of calibration of the ISO sensitivity settings on their cameras.
To which Bill Janes replied
The D800e uses REI (recommended exposure index) for its speed rating and I understand that this is also in compliance with the CIPA standards. The REI is arbitrary and the maker could assign whatever value they wish, so that standard is not lilmiting. In my own tests with the D800e exposing the target at ISO 100 according to the light meter reading gives a sensor saturation of 12.2% which is in accordance with the Ssat standard.
My original statement needs some refinement. As far as I can tell, the flexibility of "REI" is there simply to allow flexibility in multi-zone light metering algorithms; insisting on SSOS would restrict cameras to some standard averaged brightness metering. In practice it seems that basic metering modes do more or less follow SSOS. In fact, if a camera were to deviate significantly form this, its handling of simple low contrast scenes would produce out-of-camera JPEGs significantly lighter or darker than from other cameras, and customers would notice, and complain. In other words, for basic metering, or metering on a subject of fairly uniform brightness (as with spot metering), market forces keep in-camera metering close to SSOS, with placement of metered mid-tones at a JPEG level near 112, which is just under 18%.

Also, allowing for the highlight roll-off typically used in default JPEG conversion tone curves, it makes sense that mid-tones are placed a bit below 18% of FWC (or maximum raw level): a 1/2 stop of roll-off requires placing them at about 12.5%, close to what you observed with the D800e. This is also what the ISO 12232(2006) standard hints at when it defines SSat: it mentions adding 1/2 stop of headroom.
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