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Author Topic: keeping your filters clean  (Read 3161 times)

Abbye

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keeping your filters clean
« on: May 03, 2012, 01:46:47 pm »

hey there, i was curious if anyone could suggest a specific wipe or cloth they use to dry lenses/filters while shooting near the ocean with lots of ocean spray?

i've become frustrated coming home to find little water droplets throughout my images, but am worried about ruining my filters by scratching them a kleenex or sweater sleeve.
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Wayne Fox

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2012, 10:35:00 pm »

Well, you're right, don't use those!

There are several high quality microfiber clothes that do a nice job.  If it's salt water, I'd be careful as the cloth can get crystals of salt.  Important that there is no sand, grit, etc that might scratch the surface.  If you let the sea spray dry, you may want to use a good lens cleaning solution to moisten the surface to dissolve the minerals before cleaning.  Not enough liquid to just breath on it if it's sea spray, better to use a few drops of the solution.  Most good camera stores have this.

some also use alcohol like eclipse which is designed for sensors.  I personally don't recommend this, lens have pretty delicate coatings which I think the alcohol can damage.  I prefer lens cleaning solutions for lenses, sensor solutions for sensors.
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Abbye

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2012, 10:47:12 pm »

thanks wayne fox,

do you have any specific brands of microfiber cloths you recommend?
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brianrybolt

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2012, 01:29:39 pm »

As far as I know, they are virtually all the same.  There's one brand (can't remember the name) which is a small lens cleaning cloth that's attached to a very small pouch with a small clip on it.  Clip it on you camera bag or whatever.  I'm constantly losing them.
Brian

Gary Brown

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2012, 02:23:46 pm »

There's one brand (can't remember the name) which is a small lens cleaning cloth that's attached to a very small pouch with a small clip on it.

Spudz (available from their Web site or camera stores etc.)
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schrodingerscat

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2012, 02:28:03 pm »

In a situation like that I'd use lens tissue rather than micro fibre cloths, which would rapidly get loaded with salts(as well as dirt, dust, etc.). A good lens cleaning fluid is also advisable to dilute the salt spray or loosen it if already dried. Most techs I know use Anhydrous Isopropyl alcohol for most photo glass cleaning, though some have started using ammonia for particularly stubborn deposits. Try to not dry rub, and blow it off first if already dry. Eclipse is expensive overkill for lenses. Any good lens fluid will do.

Use of clothing, kleenex, etc. is not recommended. And if you must use a microfiber cloth, toss it in the washer frequently as those thing get gunked up fairly quickly. Use optics specific cloths, except those marketed for eyeglasses as they are usually infused with cleaning solutions.

While on the subject of camera maintenance, no Q-tips in the mirror box please, unless you know what you are doing. Have seen more and more equipment come in with fuzz all over the place. Nikons are especially prone, as they use a flocked material on the mirror box side walls. Makes sensor cleaning(and having it stay clean) a real PIA.
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Javier S.

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2012, 05:44:26 pm »

Hi. As an underwater photographer I deal with salt sprays from time to time (some times not only sprays).
The best I found to remove salt is to dilute it and the best way to do it is to put your filter into fresh water.
As most waters have minerals, the best is to use distilled water (very cheap to have at home), but if you´re out, any water is far better than risking to put the filter into its pouch where it can move, even slightly, and get thus scratched.

After that you can clean it with whatever you usally do.

I´ve already saved a couple of cameras that got sunk in sea water by just getting the battery off, and heve them into fresh water for some hours, changing water from time to time to assure that all salt disolutes. I kept working with one of them 24 hrs later after well dryed and have it revised, just in case, after another week working with it.
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jgbowerman

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2012, 11:19:41 am »

I use "Lens Clean" by VisibleDust. It eliminates the tendency to smear or streak, a big problem with some cleaners, especially filters with MRC. Also, I'm of the opinion microfiber cloth is not all created equal. I'm going by tactile properties, nothing scientific. Some microfiber is of a course weave, and others are much finer and softer. Not sure if it makes a difference, but I'm going to use the finer cloths, wash them frequently, and not take any chances.

http://visibledust.com/products3.php?pid=304
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Colorado David

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2012, 07:45:07 pm »

As far as I know, they are virtually all the same.  There's one brand (can't remember the name) which is a small lens cleaning cloth that's attached to a very small pouch with a small clip on it.  Clip it on you camera bag or whatever.  I'm constantly losing them.
Brian

Pick them up from trade shows.  I have a bunch with different manufacturers names on them.

Scott O.

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Re: keeping your filters clean
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2012, 10:22:42 am »

There are several manufacturers, Handyman among them, who are marketing single use lens cleaners.  They come in a sealed packet, pee-moistened and intended for one use.  I have not used them and imagine that the per use cost is high compared to other methods, but they look interesting.  Anyone have experience?
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