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Author Topic: Love those Trees  (Read 783669 times)

djgarcia

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Love those Trees
« Reply #100 on: January 04, 2010, 08:11:56 pm »

Quote from: wolfnowl
Were these taken in `The Garden of the Gods`at Manitou Springs, CO?  Looks like that area.

Mike.
Manitou Springs - wow, a blast from the past for me! I was there for a couple of days in '72 visiting a friend in an end-of-college road trip before going to work, but I didn't have a camera back then. They're from around the Needles District near Moab, Utah. Or so say my notes    ...

DJ
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collum

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« Reply #101 on: January 06, 2010, 01:36:51 am »

from the same series

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tim wolcott

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« Reply #102 on: January 06, 2010, 01:22:21 pm »

Patricia, thanks love the way you think and read into the images.  Its the thoughts and the commentary that i was trying to evoke.  I have been in the pursuit of creating images and not just shooting them.  I don't believe in just shooting, everything must be envisioned and pre-visualized to create great images.  

I will have to say that in the older days of B&W that everyone had to do this, since the days of digital camera's this unfortunate idea of shooting and hoping to get something has come into photography.  I was taught to see the final image you want to create and make it happen.  I spend enormous amount of time looking at images and art to remember what I have seen and evoke some kind of feeling.  Natures perfection is all around us, we need to be able to see it and respond.  I like to take pieces of this and draw my future photographs.  And yes I for sure am the worst drawer in the world, mainly because I think to detailed, but it gives me references for my mind to focus onto the next time I go out.  Every time I go out i look at these drawings in the night time and morning.  So when I'm out looking for nature to present herself to me, what ends up happening is something from one drawing and what's in front of me mixes together and a get something even better.  But then sometimes it could take 7 years to see the final drawing in a photograph.  I've said it before Inspiration comes from many sources. Photograph, memories, paintings ect.

The image "In the Rivers Path" reminded me of something Paul Caponegro would have wanted to shoot.  The relationship of the rock protecting the tree and the zen like water flowing around the boulder.  Its very asian in thinking.   They all have their place, without one of them perfection wouldn't had been there in nature.

Take the case of Dogwoods that I have been posting.  I set off to create and capture the most elegant dogwoods I could photograph.  So I started to draw them from things I've seen and things I would like to see.  "Positive thoughts create your path".

On the composition thought, I look thru a framing card, this allows me to shoot at the focal length of what I see and then set the camera up to mimic that.  I know I could not create the images i shoot without the cards..  It helps me redefine my focus and composition to a perfect as a shot as I can make it.

"There is phrase I like to say:  There are no short cuts.  Great photography requires understanding light and composition, vision and patience – simple discipline – simple but never easy."  TW

Again thanks for the posts everyone, we can learn from everyone.


 


 
Quote from: psheleyimages
This thread has been very satisfying , almost a meditation...In Tim's original post, the #3 image, "In the River's Path",  quiets and focuses my thinking...what Tim refers to as pre-visualization...To me it is one that seems to break many rules but draws me in anyway...I hear it, I smell the lush breakage in the constancy of the waterflow, and yet quietly on the top of that boulder an entire history of the seasons is unfolding before our eyes...

It is not the type of image I gravitate to,yet it calms me...I think about it sometimes when I am sitting behind the camera, this weekend past with the camera and 300 on a wimberly head tied into the tree where I had climbed...I spent the entire afternoon and early evening looking through the trees...isolating by aperture and shifting light various forest shots and then as the last rays slid behind the ridgeline the "framing card mentality" caught this brief moment...I have been taking the time to seek the smaller stories within(As in Tim's where  that one tenacious leaf on the trio of tree trunks alongside that boulder somehow says "awareness of place".  I see it in much of Tim's work ) and hope to grow photographically on their nourishment.

Thank you to all who are placing their vision in our view...I know I will grow from this group of images and commentary...This was my last shot of the day...Patricia S.

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dwood

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« Reply #103 on: January 06, 2010, 03:08:46 pm »

Quote from: collum
from the same series

Love this picture collum. It really draws me in. I want to step over the log, and explore what's beyond. I'll bet this makes for a nice print.

JamiePeters

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« Reply #104 on: January 06, 2010, 08:20:18 pm »

So in order to shoot with a framing card should they be the ratio size of the chip or should they be the size of the framing material.  Or should I say the size of the image to be framed.  I think I will give this a try.  

But what I find interesting is that you are thinking different than the rest of us.  You are thinking like a painter but doing photography. Your thoughts and approach is something we can learn from, I think Patricia said it best, we all can learn from these postings.

 JP
Quote from: tim wolcott
Patricia, thanks love the way you think and read into the images.  Its the thoughts and the commentary that i was trying to evoke.  I have been in the pursuit of creating images and not just shooting them.  I don't believe in just shooting, everything must be envisioned and pre-visualized to create great images.  

I will have to say that in the older days of B&W that everyone had to do this, since the days of digital camera's this unfortunate idea of shooting and hoping to get something has come into photography.  I was taught to see the final image you want to create and make it happen.  I spend enormous amount of time looking at images and art to remember what I have seen and evoke some kind of feeling.  Natures perfection is all around us, we need to be able to see it and respond.  I like to take pieces of this and draw my future photographs.  And yes I for sure am the worst drawer in the world, mainly because I think to detailed, but it gives me references for my mind to focus onto the next time I go out.  Every time I go out i look at these drawings in the night time and morning.  So when I'm out looking for nature to present herself to me, what ends up happening is something from one drawing and what's in front of me mixes together and a get something even better.  But then sometimes it could take 7 years to see the final drawing in a photograph.  I've said it before Inspiration comes from many sources. Photograph, memories, paintings ect.

The image "In the Rivers Path" reminded me of something Paul Caponegro would have wanted to shoot.  The relationship of the rock protecting the tree and the zen like water flowing around the boulder.  Its very asian in thinking.   They all have their place, without one of them perfection wouldn't had been there in nature.

Take the case of Dogwoods that I have been posting.  I set off to create and capture the most elegant dogwoods I could photograph.  So I started to draw them from things I've seen and things I would like to see.  "Positive thoughts create your path".

On the composition thought, I look thru a framing card, this allows me to shoot at the focal length of what I see and then set the camera up to mimic that.  I know I could not create the images i shoot without the cards..  It helps me redefine my focus and composition to a perfect as a shot as I can make it.

"There is phrase I like to say:  There are no short cuts.  Great photography requires understanding light and composition, vision and patience – simple discipline – simple but never easy."  TW

Again thanks for the posts everyone, we can learn from everyone.
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Patricia Sheley

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« Reply #105 on: January 07, 2010, 02:26:50 pm »

JP I can not speak for Tim, but one very efficient and easily kept with your gear, in your car , wallet etc is "View Catcher"  You can learn a bit about it at  www.ViewCatcher.com.  The reason I mention your car, or bicycle or bike is because even when you don't have your photo gear along, studying composition anywhere you happen to be is so beneficial to your vision...as Tim said, once you've found your chosen composition, it is thinking out the lens that will best do that  job and then studying the timing of light by season , time of day, serendipity, weather etc...somewhere I read that Tim even has a family member who seeks out possible locations...I think it is why I find a good deal of Tim's work small meditations...he puts in that intensly aware time for that shot to "happen".  Everything in your personal blueprint informs your vision...Really "looking" is one of the finest brushes on the pallette... Hope this helps with your question...I guess I could have said "it's not about the crop, but rather the composition", but it really is about an instinct you are continually refining with the "control" being the view you use as a constant..Pat (and so much more that is your unique fingerprint}

http://www.colorwheelco.com/viewcatcher/


Quote from: JamiePeters
So in order to shoot with a framing card should they be the ratio size of the chip or should they be the size of the framing material.  Or should I say the size of the image to be framed.  I think I will give this a try.  

But what I find interesting is that you are thinking different than the rest of us.  You are thinking like a painter but doing photography. Your thoughts and approach is something we can learn from, I think Patricia said it best, we all can learn from these postings.

 JP
« Last Edit: January 07, 2010, 02:28:04 pm by psheleyimages »
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LoisWakeman

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Love those Trees
« Reply #106 on: January 07, 2010, 03:11:17 pm »

Quote from: psheleyimages
Really "looking" is one of the finest brushes on the pallette
Well said Pat. Learning to see is, IME, the hardest part of photography, and we continue learning as long as we live (or if we don't, we stagnate!).

I think one of the advantages of using a viewing frame is that it frees the mind to look at the scene without cluttering the brain with technical considerations, which may be almost subconscious. And perhaps the other is that it makes it easier to visualise the result: the brain is very good at filtering out detail of less interest (which is why we get so many snapshots of Granny with a tree growing out of her head of course). The act of actually looking at the framed scene seems somehow to focus attention better than peering through a viewfinder.
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stevenf

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« Reply #107 on: January 09, 2010, 01:12:39 am »

Hi Tim

I like your ideas on photography and your dedication to your craft.

I thought I would add to your beautiful tree images. These were all taken with a Horseman 617 Camera with Fuji Velvia 50 Film. I have been shooting some of these tree stands for 5 years. I have spent countless days in these forests looking for the rights set of trees to photograph. getting the right light, and waiting for the leaves to be still combined with getting the timing right for the colour takes time and dedictation. I have three viewfinders for each of my lenses for the panormaic camera and this helps finding the composition in a chaotic scene like a forest.

My prints are 23" x 69" and 30" x 90", all images are matched to the slides and none of the images are cropped.

If you want to see more of my work you can have a look at my website.

Steven

Visit My Website

www.friedmanphoto.com





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wolfnowl

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« Reply #108 on: January 09, 2010, 01:39:48 am »

Great work, Steven.  Thanks for sharing them!

Mike.
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John R

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« Reply #109 on: January 09, 2010, 02:18:02 am »

Excellent work Steven, especially like your panoramas. Also peaked at your abstracts, very nice!

JMR
« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 02:18:18 am by John R »
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mattpallante

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« Reply #110 on: January 09, 2010, 11:32:09 am »

Love your trees and abstracts Steven. I really enjoyed looking at your website. So many fine images!

                                Matt
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JamiePeters

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« Reply #111 on: January 09, 2010, 12:14:58 pm »

Very nice Steven,  Love the pano's.  Your choice of where you stand is fantastic.  The even composition is great.  JP
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stevenf

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« Reply #112 on: January 09, 2010, 05:55:40 pm »

John, Matt, Jamie and Mike

Thanks for the positive feedback.

Jamie - I find the use of the viewfinders I use help to make deciding where to decide in a forest.

Steven

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tim wolcott

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« Reply #113 on: January 10, 2010, 01:17:49 pm »

Steven very nice selection of trees.  I like the fact you actually positioned yourself so the were no holes in the trees and that you gave it some serious thought of just how you wanted your panorama to flow.  

NIce very very nice.  Tim
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tim wolcott

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« Reply #114 on: January 10, 2010, 04:22:49 pm »

Steven, I see that you shoot all of you images with Pano camera system uncropped and one shot one capture.  For everyone who would like to shoot panorama's.  There three ways I see that they can be shot.  

1.  Shoot them with a panorama camera system.

2.  Shoot them with large camera's and crop down.  A process I used to do with my 8x10 and 4x5 camera.

3. Is to stitch them, I started to shoot this style because I use my P45 Phase One camera like a old Banquet camera.  Some of the images I will be posting are shot either with 3 frames up to 10 frames carefully planned and stitched to mimic what my eye saw through the framing card.  This style is very difficult when shooting in a forest.  But allows me to shoot everything very close to the subject and makes the images very 3d looking.  Either way you try to shoot, the mixture between having the right light with the right composition, angle of camera, right focal length lens and depth of field will make or brake your shot.

Let me say every style is correct, its a matter of the way you shoot.  For me I would like to shoot also with a Pano camera but since my pack weight's 65 pounds not counting a tripod.  I am left with little options.  Enjoy Tim

Here is some that are not on my website.  I will post some later the Packers are about ready to play.





Quote from: stevenf
Hi Tim

I like your ideas on photography and your dedication to your craft.

I thought I would add to your beautiful tree images. These were all taken with a Horseman 617 Camera with Fuji Velvia 50 Film. I have been shooting some of these tree stands for 5 years. I have spent countless days in these forests looking for the rights set of trees to photograph. getting the right light, and waiting for the leaves to be still combined with getting the timing right for the colour takes time and dedictation. I have three viewfinders for each of my lenses for the panormaic camera and this helps finding the composition in a chaotic scene like a forest.

My prints are 23" x 69" and 30" x 90", all images are matched to the slides and none of the images are cropped.

If you want to see more of my work you can have a look at my website.

Steven

Visit My Website

www.friedmanphoto.com
« Last Edit: January 11, 2010, 05:54:33 pm by tim wolcott »
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JamiePeters

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« Reply #115 on: January 10, 2010, 10:31:38 pm »

This is what the site needs professionals who sell their images for living showing what and how images should look.  I thank you for the professionalism to show us how you do the images.  Will check into what a banquet camera is and how it works.  You two sure know how to shoot trees.  

Can't wait to see what you guys post next.  Magnificant.  JP


Quote from: tim wolcott
Steven, I see that you shoot all of you images with Pano camera system uncropped and one shot one capture.  For everyone who would like to shoot panorama's.  There three ways I see that they can be shot.  

1.  Shoot them with a panorama camera system.

2.  Shoot them with large camera's and crop down.  A process I used to do with my 8x10 and 4x5 camera.

3. Is to stitch them, I started to shoot this style because I use my P45 Phase One camera like a old Banquet camera.  Some of the images I will be posting are shot either with 3 frames up to 10 frames carefully planned and stitched to mimic what my eye saw through the framing card.  This style is very difficult when shooting in a forest.  But allows me to shoot everything very close to the subject and makes the images very 3d looking.  Either way you try to shoot, the mixture between having the right light with the right composition, angle of camera, right focal length lens and depth of field will make or brake your shot.

Let me say every style is correct, its a matter of the way you shoot.  For me I would like to shoot also with a Pano camera but since my pack weight's 65 pounds not counting a tripod.  I am left with little options.  Enjoy Tim

Here is some that are not on my website.  I will post some later the Packers are about ready to play.
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stevenf

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« Reply #116 on: January 11, 2010, 12:34:49 am »

Hi Jamie

Thanks for your note. I think you just have to decide what you want from your photography. I have always had the belief to capture images that evoke emotion and excitement and images that I want to hang on my wall. I can go away for 3 weeks or more and come back with a handful of images that have this in mind.

If you are interested I have a show of 15 prints as part of Exposure 2010 in the Calgary area next month.

Steven
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wolfnowl

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« Reply #117 on: January 11, 2010, 02:26:24 am »

Quote from: tim wolcott
Steven, I see that you shoot all of you images with Pano camera system uncropped and one shot one capture.  For everyone who would like to shoot panorama's.  There three ways I see that they can be shot.
Hi Tim:  Just to give the Hugin pano software a workout I took my little Fuji walkaround camera and tripod up on top of Christmas Hill and shot 55 images.  Result is below.  It's not a great image but it turned out alright, and it does have trees in it!

Mike.

[attachment=19352:DSCF7065_P.jpg]
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tim wolcott

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« Reply #118 on: January 11, 2010, 04:04:52 pm »

Here are the rest of the images.  I'm in morning about the Packers loss.  Thanks reedited them to sRGB files, thanks Steven for pointing that out to me.  Tim

Visit my website at  www.GalleryoftheAmericanLandscape.com



Quote from: wolfnowl
Hi Tim:  Just to give the Hugin pano software a workout I took my little Fuji walkaround camera and tripod up on top of Christmas Hill and shot 55 images.  Result is below.  It's not a great image but it turned out alright, and it does have trees in it!

Mike.

[attachment=19352:DSCF7065_P.jpg]
« Last Edit: January 11, 2010, 06:45:02 pm by tim wolcott »
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Justan

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« Reply #119 on: January 11, 2010, 04:10:45 pm »

Tim (and anyone else who cares to respond),

I really enjoy your work. In addition to everything else you do right, your treatment of color is superb. Can you or anyone point me to some reference materials on color treatment??

Below is my 3rd stitch…

« Last Edit: January 11, 2010, 04:28:40 pm by Justan »
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