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Author Topic: Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens  (Read 23095 times)

stever

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2010, 11:00:01 pm »

i'm confused then, as i don't hear the mirror when shooting in liveview
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ThomasPoeschmann

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2010, 09:27:34 am »

Quote from: stever
Jeff, why switch out of live view to take the exposure?

If you use live view your sensor will heat up. This may degrade image quality as moire noise becomes visible. Maybe it is not a problem for you...
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JonRoemer

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2010, 10:02:53 am »

Quote from: ThomasPoeschmann
If you use live view your sensor will heat up. This may degrade image quality as moire noise becomes visible. Maybe it is not a problem for you...


I'll second this.  Maybe it's not an issue with newer camera models (since they can shoot video?) but it's certainly the case with the 1DsM3.  Leave live view on too long and you'll get stuck pixels.

I have never seen it when using live view on the camera's screen but in that case I have live view on only for short infrequent bursts.  I have seen it when I tested live view tethered to my laptop and the focusing was done via the feed to the laptop.  Then live view can be on for a few minutes or more.

I would tend to think the same thing would happen when using it in camera.  It's fine to set focus but leave it on for extended periods and you'll probably get stuck pixels.
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stever

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #23 on: March 05, 2010, 10:22:36 am »

i agree that sensor heating may be an issue - particularly in hot weather, however i'd like to hear some knowledgeable advice/experience with the 5D2.

i tend not to use live view for extended periods, but in many instances, e.g. flowers, i want to watch the image at 10x and trip the shutter when motion stops.  or for hdr i want to compose and imediately take 3 bracketed shots

i'm really not convinced that sensor heating on the 5D2 and 7D are a big problem - there are a lot of people making movies that are very critical of image quality

the other question i'd pose is that if sensor heating is really a problem, how long do you have to turn off live view to let the sensor cool?

I'd still like a clear answer on when - if ever - the mirror moves when shooting in liveview
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JeffKohn

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #24 on: March 05, 2010, 10:40:55 am »

Quote from: stever
i'm confused then, as i don't hear the mirror when shooting in liveview
I shoot Nikon, and with their Live-View implementation the mirror doesn't stay up when taking the exposure. It essentially turns live-view off, drops the mirror, and then takes the exposure as normal. So the mirror is definitely in play. I think Canon may be different in that regard.

On the heat issue, I'm not sure how big a deal that is. But even if it is, I figure turning off live-view and going to M-UP mode gives the sensor several seconds to cool off just in case.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2010, 10:41:27 am by JeffKohn »
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Scott O.

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2010, 07:30:37 pm »

To get to the original question, I shoot with the Nikon 45 t/s lens and love it.  One thing I didn't note mentioned was the use of a t/s lens in the creation of panoramas.  Fabulous.  See the latest issue of Outdoor Photographer for how Jack Dykinga does it...

JeffKohn

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2010, 03:17:18 pm »

Quote from: soberle
To get to the original question, I shoot with the Nikon 45 t/s lens and love it.  One thing I didn't note mentioned was the use of a t/s lens in the creation of panoramas.  Fabulous.  See the latest issue of Outdoor Photographer for how Jack Dykinga does it...
I touched on that in post #13. I find it a very useful technique when I don't have the time or desire to do a larger stitch the traditional way. The 45 PC-E and 85 PC-E are particularly good for this, the 24 PC-E somewhat less so on full-frame.

I couldn't help but chuckle at the way the OP article makes it sounds like Dykinga had invented some ground-breaking new technique though. I've been using shift lenses to stitch for a few years now; and I certainly wasn't the first, as I'm sure people have been doing it for as long as DSLR's have been around (and probably folks were doing it with film even before that). The one thing I find strange is that Dykinga's example photos all were captioned as being a combination anywhere from 5-7 shots. That makes no sense to me, because there is no reason to take more than 3 shots with this technique. Maybe he thinks extra overlap helps with parallax issues, but it's not a complete solution. A far better way is to move the camera in the opposite direction you're shifting the lens, so that the net effect is that the lens is stationary and you get the equivalent of a rear-standard shift.
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uaiomex

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2010, 11:32:26 pm »

I agree. Very confusing article. I've been doing that since I got my first dslr, a 10D.
The popular way is the cross-format shoot. (3 verticals for a stitched horizontal or viceversa). This technique gives you a 4:3 ratio (aprox.) that some prefer. However, you can use the non cross-format method to keep the 2:3 ratio of all dslr's. You shoot 5 horizontals for a stitched horizontal or 5 verts for a stitched vert. You do the shifting at 45 degrees instead of up-down or left-right. You can start at center, then shift to 10:30, to 1:30, to 4:30 and finally to 7:30. It is a lot more complicated than the cross-format method but yields a 2:3 ratio picture with slightly more pixels.
I wonder how Dykinga manages 7 stitches with a TS!
Best
Eduardo

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Quote from: JeffKohn
I touched on that in post #13. I find it a very useful technique when I don't have the time or desire to do a larger stitch the traditional way. The 45 PC-E and 85 PC-E are particularly good for this, the 24 PC-E somewhat less so on full-frame.

I couldn't help but chuckle at the way the OP article makes it sounds like Dykinga had invented some ground-breaking new technique though. I've been using shift lenses to stitch for a few years now; and I certainly wasn't the first, as I'm sure people have been doing it for as long as DSLR's have been around (and probably folks were doing it with film even before that). The one thing I find strange is that Dykinga's example photos all were captioned as being a combination anywhere from 5-7 shots. That makes no sense to me, because there is no reason to take more than 3 shots with this technique. Maybe he thinks extra overlap helps with parallax issues, but it's not a complete solution. A far better way is to move the camera in the opposite direction you're shifting the lens, so that the net effect is that the lens is stationary and you get the equivalent of a rear-standard shift.
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dasams

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #28 on: March 08, 2010, 01:14:29 pm »

Quote from: JeffKohn
The one thing I find strange is that Dykinga's example photos all were captioned as being a combination anywhere from 5-7 shots. That makes no sense to me, because there is no reason to take more than 3 shots with this technique.
Makes no sense to me either unless he's trying to use the central slice of each image and stitching with PS's 'perspective' or 'cylindrical' options.  I prefer the 'reposition only' option which I find best suited for panos created with shift lenses.
Quote from: JeffKohn
Maybe he thinks extra overlap helps with parallax issues, but it's not a complete solution. A far better way is to move the camera in the opposite direction you're shifting the lens, so that the net effect is that the lens is stationary and you get the equivalent of a rear-standard shift.
Agreed.  This is the technique that I use.  dave
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Kirk Gittings

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #29 on: March 08, 2010, 01:23:53 pm »

There is allot wrong with this article and knowing Dykinga, I suspect it comes from a bad reviewer who took lousy notes. I routinely do architecture and landscape 2, 3 and 4 frames stitches with Canon 24, 45, and 90 t/s lenses and occasionally with 4x5 view cameras. On the 24 a 4 frame stitch would be up and left, bottom and left, top right, bottom right, which yields a stitched frame with allot of overlap and somewhat less linear and a larger file than a simple left right flat stitch.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2010, 01:25:23 pm by Kirk Gittings »
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JeffKohn

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #30 on: March 08, 2010, 01:38:52 pm »

Quote from: Kirk Gittings
There is allot wrong with this article and knowing Dykinga, I suspect it comes from a bad reviewer who took lousy notes. I routinely do architecture and landscape 2, 3 and 4 frames stitches with Canon 24, 45, and 90 t/s lenses and occasionally with 4x5 view cameras. On the 24 a 4 frame stitch would be up and left, bottom and left, top right, bottom right, which yields a stitched frame with allot of overlap and somewhat less linear and a larger file than a simple left right flat stitch.
It wouldn't surprise me if it was shoddy reporting on OP's part. I like some of the monthly columns and often enjoy the photography, but the feature articles and how-to tips in that magazine are often just fluff (at best).

I have done some experimentation with 2x2 stitching, but found it was more trouble than it was worth in most cases, unless it's the only option to get the FOV you need. The bump is resolution over a 3-shot stitch is not much, and it makes composing and shooting more tedious.
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Kirk Gittings

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #31 on: March 08, 2010, 03:14:30 pm »

Quote
I have done some experimentation with 2x2 stitching, but found it was more trouble than it was worth in most cases, unless it's the only option to get the FOV you need. The bump is resolution over a 3-shot stitch is not much, and it makes composing and shooting more tedious.

Agreed. By far 90% of my stitches are flat-side to side horizontals with the 24, or 3x vertical or horizontal with the 45.

My point though about Dykinga, from knowing him a bit, is that he is a pretty straight forward guy, no b______T. If he said it he means it. For example there is a suggestion in that article that Dykinga invented shift stitching-he would know better and not make such a claim. Just didn't sound like the Dykinga I know.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2010, 03:18:04 pm by Kirk Gittings »
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Eric Brody

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #32 on: March 09, 2010, 11:39:53 pm »

I recently acquired a Nikon 45 PC-E, after renting both the 24 and 45. I have used 4x5 cameras for the past thirty years and really looked forward to being able to use shift and especially tilt with my D700. My most commonly used lenses for the 4x5 are 150 and 210 so a "normal" tilt shift lens seemed quite appealing. Most of my images are nature, landscapes, and some architecture. The 45 is a blast. I have not done much stitching, yet, but the 45 has transformed my work in the field. I also have done a couple of workshops with Jack Dykinga and admire his work. He can set up and expose three sheets of 4x5 film while I'm still roaming about with my viewing card. I agree with Kirk that he is a straight shooter, pun intended.

Eric

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kuau

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Thoughts on Canon 45 TS-E as Landscape lens
« Reply #33 on: March 17, 2010, 01:41:28 am »

I shoot with a D3x, and I own all 3 of Nikons PC-E lenses, The 85mm is the top performer, much better then the 24 or 45mm.
I found when I use to shoot with the D700 all 3 lens performed very well, but when I moved up to the D3x, 24mp starting showing the short comings of the 24 and 45mm lenses. I believe it's the same with canon. Same story. The 90mm is stellar but the 45mm on the 1Ds MKIII and 5d MKII is not as good as the zeiss 50mm macro, take a lppk at diglloyd.com he has done extensive testing.
I just rented the 35mm and 50mm zeiss and will be doing some tests this week.
Yes I love having the shift option for framing purposes, works great, but.... on my D3x the files are not what I call "crackling" when I use the 45mm PC-E lens.
What I have found is purchasing lenses for 24mo FF DSLR, you have to have the absolute best lens in front or your wasting your money on the higher MP.
I am also pretty sure it's the same way with canon, and to be honest it will be very interesting to see when the IDS MKIV is releases with even a higher mp what lenses will actually be up to the call for this body. I can't imagine any of the current zooms will fair to well. Will be interesting for sure.

Steven

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