Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 8   Go Down

Author Topic: Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?  (Read 83534 times)

ThierryH

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 409
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2009, 08:11:06 am »

Jack,

I guess Adam's site would be one place to go, but I don't have the link to his site.

Also, have a look at Rainer Viertlböck's work, here:

www.tangential.de

or the work from Torben Eskerod

http://www.phaseone.com/upload/casestudy_t...eskerod_001.pdf

I think they are all good examples of European architecture photography.

I hope this helps.

Best regards,
Thierry


Quote from: Lust4Life
Adam,

Would you share with me a few web sites for European photographers that indicate the "lightless" style you mentioned.
Logged

adammork

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 165
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2009, 11:23:42 am »

Quote from: Lust4Life
Adam,

Would you share with me a few web sites for European photographers, other than what Pedro above suggested, that specifically indicate the "lightless" style you mentioned?

I'm afraid my "purist" approach to Landscape photography has predisposition me to working "naked".

As several have suggested, find my own style, and that may be it - Naked Architectural Photographer - think I'll copyright that.
(That's the image that would be naked, not me.)  

Jack

Jack,

A member of this forum is working on my site at the moment  

Take a look at Thiery's suggestions or take a look here at some of my work, all this is assignments, mainly for the architects behind the projects, not a single light used:  http://www.adammork.dk/works1

In general I think, that it's importen as an architectural photographer to develop a strong sense and understanding for the space's you are trying to capture with our 2-dimensional media. the space are, simplified said created with light and shadow through structure - it's the architects mission and art to create and define that space - not the photographer through 100's of lamps..... this is just my opinion as an architect and photographer.

What the photographer should add, like Rainer said, is careful timing of the day for the best light possible - a strong view and composition and choose what too see, and at least as importen, what not to see.

/adam
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 11:25:09 am by adammork »
Logged

Rob C

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24074
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #42 on: October 16, 2009, 12:27:29 pm »

Quote from: adammork
Jack,

 or take a look here at some of my work, all this is assignments, mainly for the architects behind the projects, not a single light used:  http://www.adammork.dk/works1


/adam





Very attractive work, Adam, and I think what comes to mind, via its manifestation within another medium, is the difference between what used to be catalogue fashion photography and editorial fashion photography.

Within the catalogue category, the brief was to 'show every stitch' and I guess that that's what many architectural shooters also feel obliged to do. I would put your work into the editorial category and what that means to me is this: you feel freedom to capture the atmosphere of a location as distinct from its component materials at all costs!

In my time, I found that though my 'book', a collection of mainly my own freestyle work got me business, I was not encouraged to shoot in the same way by many clients who generally wanted product to reign supreme. Difficult, that, and it's a matter of damn good fortune when you find a client willing to take you on trust.

Rob C

Roskav

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 254
    • http://www.roskavanagh.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #43 on: October 16, 2009, 04:54:56 pm »

Have to echo comments and say that this is a fantastic thread with so many great links posted.  To add to the bunch...
http://www.viewpictures.co.uk/  
(we're always looking over the water to see how it's done there    )

Ros


PS in relation to light ... I always have a 1500W monoblock handy to bounce off a ceiling for some fill if needed... really helps but it's best when you don't notice that it has been used... you just see some detail on the inside of window frames and the like.
R
Logged

rainer_v

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1194
    • http://www.tangential.de
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #44 on: October 16, 2009, 05:28:06 pm »

removed
« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 03:30:26 am by rainer_v »
Logged
rainer viertlböck
architecture photograp

rethmeier

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 795
    • http://www.willemrethmeier.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #45 on: October 16, 2009, 05:38:36 pm »

Great stuff Adam and Rainer!
Logged
Willem Rethmeier
www.willemrethmeier.com

Lust4Life

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 713
    • http://www.shadowsdancing.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #46 on: October 16, 2009, 05:46:32 pm »

First, what a great resource this thread has become for me in my quest to define my next direction.
I'm sure it will also serve others well in the future that find themselves pondering their direction in photography.

As one can imagine, this weekend will be spent checking out all the excellent sites/photographers listed in this thread.

I must admit, sites I've looked at so far that are using basically natural light are more to my minds eye examples of what I'm interested in.
Granted, this may not be the dominant style here in the States, but as Kirk suggest, "Find your style and keep going" blends well with my mindset.

On an earlier comment, the ability to translate a 3D world into a 2D media is one that I have spent many year on.  I worked in the world of developing 3D software for the motion picture industy, SIM, VR and AR worlds.  Thus, I hope that "visualization" mindset will serve me well in this endeavor.

Rainer - was encouraging to see that you're a naturalist - I'd admired your images that I've seen posted here and else where over the years, and must admit to being excited to learn that you have done the majority of your work with Natural Light!

Kirk - you're another who's work I've admired - now to see if I can rival your talents and do it in my own way.  You've crossed the Landscape talents so well with the Arch. work.

As to my initial comments about HDR, I see it as a tool to increase the "visualization" in my work.  Key is to keep it under control to just compliment the subject, rather than supplant it.  Additionally, stitching, as Kirk suggested, has proven very positive for me in the past with landscape scenes-particularly multi-row.

In short, thanks to ALL who have contributed so far.
Will be interesting to see what additional posts are added over the weekend.

Jack
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 05:54:04 pm by Lust4Life »
Logged
Jack

gdwhalen

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 173
    • http://www.gdwhalen.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #47 on: October 16, 2009, 06:41:55 pm »

Think about photography (in this case architectural photography) in the same light you would think about being great at anything.  Lots of time and lots of hard work.  I don't care whether it is a camera, tuba, scalpel, paint brush, legal brief, tennis or golf.  It takes time and hard work.  The rest - doesn't matter without that.

Murray Fredericks

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 295
    • http://www.murrayfredericks.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #48 on: October 16, 2009, 09:23:20 pm »

While we are on the topic of great/distinctive personal styles in architectural photography...check out Tim Griffith's work

http://www.timgriffith.com/

Could not agree more with the previous post that 'work' is the essential element in all of this!

Murray
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 09:23:44 pm by Murray Fredericks »
Logged
Exhibition Website   http://www.murrayfr

Lust4Life

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 713
    • http://www.shadowsdancing.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #49 on: October 16, 2009, 10:15:33 pm »

Agree - that's a given - when I had my software company my average work week over 11 years was 83 hours.  Took one vacation of 4 days in the 11 years.  But that was a period in my life where I had the most intellectual fun I've ever experienced.  

Thus, hard work is better described as:
One must be Possessed to run with the Best.
(or so my Wife told me.)
 


Quote from: gdwhalen
Think about photography (in this case architectural photography) in the same light you would think about being great at anything.  Lots of time and lots of hard work.  I don't care whether it is a camera, tuba, scalpel, paint brush, legal brief, tennis or golf.  It takes time and hard work.  The rest - doesn't matter without that.
Logged
Jack

Kirk Gittings

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1561
    • http://www.KirkGittings.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #50 on: October 17, 2009, 01:09:06 am »

Lust4Life. Thanks for the kind words. Allot of good work on your site. Best of luck. Keep us informed.
Logged
Thanks,
Kirk Gittings

zeitwand

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 15
    • http://www.zeitwand.de
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #51 on: October 17, 2009, 09:45:02 am »

Brigida González - stylized, clean, and crispy photography. She has her own distinctive style. My personal alltime favourite!

Pedro Pegenaute - simple, direct and honestly made photography! The way he involves humans in his work is marvelous.


Cheers!

Michael
Logged
Architectural Photography: www.zeitwand.de

marcwilson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 411
    • http://www.marcwilson.co.uk
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #52 on: October 17, 2009, 04:04:06 pm »

deleted
« Last Edit: October 17, 2009, 04:06:14 pm by marcwilson »
Logged
www.marcwilson.co.uk [url=http://www.mar

Lust4Life

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 713
    • http://www.shadowsdancing.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #53 on: October 17, 2009, 04:08:36 pm »

Ashley,

You state:
(The 'before' shots where captured at 800 iso, using a touch of fill-in flash)

What about the "after" shots - would you explain what "treatment" was done on set verse in Photoshop?
Camera/Lens?

Thanks,
Jack
Logged
Jack

Rudy Torres

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 91
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #54 on: October 18, 2009, 12:55:16 am »

Jack

WOW This thread has gotten really deep.
Lot's of good examples and good advice.

I guess my definition of Architectural Photography is a bit different compared to some of the entries made on this thread. Architectural Photography for me is both outside and inside. I've never worked with an Architect or Builder that only requests the exterior of his/her building to be photographed. Never. They do design the interior as well.

If I may be so brave and I do apologize if I am overstepping my bounds, but it sounds like you're trying to fit your definition of Architectural Photography into a mold of convenience. My point is, I don't think all of your clients will agree with your mold.

Ashley has shown you some fantastic examples of a typical Architectural shoot. Architecture is more than just the basic lines of the structure.
It's the textures, colors, and shapes that make the building feel the way it does. But as Ashley has shown you, those elements, on occasion, will need some help. You need to be ready for that.

- Rudy
Logged

Kirk Gittings

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1561
    • http://www.KirkGittings.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #55 on: October 18, 2009, 02:06:25 am »

I agree Rudy. My career shooting structures has been incredibly diverse from cutting edge contemporary architecture by leading architects and interior designers (otherwise known as interior architectects) to the historic architecture of 18th century Spanish mission churches designed by missionary priests and the vernacular architecture of 60's hippie communes and the ruins of 11th century Indian pueblos. These projects have been for everything from international magazines and books to local builders portfolios, HABS/HAER reports and NEA grants. Some have been documentary and some advertising. Some have been in color and some in b&w. I have considered it all architectural photography. IMO there is no architecture with a capital A. It is all relevant.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 02:16:35 am by Kirk Gittings »
Logged
Thanks,
Kirk Gittings

Lust4Life

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 713
    • http://www.shadowsdancing.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #56 on: October 18, 2009, 06:14:57 am »

Rudy and Kirk,

Not sure where you got that idea.
I AGREE with your statements, and frankly THAT is part of the appeal of AP (Architectural Photography) to me - diversity!

I'm wired in such a way that boredom sets in very quickly.  
A chap that is a Lawyer who I used to jog with for many years when I lived in Houston once commented - "Brady, your problem is that your vision can drill a hole to the center of the Universe, but the issue is that it's only an inch wide."  My response was "Yeah, but you missed the fact that I'm drilling twelve of them at the same time and you're only seeing one of them!"

For instance, when I'm fortunate to get a paying AP job, what's to say that at the end of the job I don't take off with my gear to shoot a landscape in the region?  Focus and mastering an art form is fun, but one must also add the element of multifaceted  adventures.  

And while I'm traversing a site with the architect, be it interior or exterior, am I not both analyzing the structure and it's interplay with light while I'm analyzing the psychological profile of the architect (both from learning how to satisfy his vision and add to my knowledge of how the Human Beast is wired)?

I think a common element in the mindset of any decent Landscape or Arch. photographer is an extension of Torben's stated in the Phase One article "A Case Study on Torben Eskerod":
“The focal point of my photography is fascination and sensitivity to the influence light has in the architectonic space. That being said I am just as interested in the darkness in the architectonic space as I am in the light.”

My obsession is how light concludes it's travel through space to expend it's energy (as reflected light or heat) when it strikes an object, whether it be a tree, the side of a persons face, is dappled through the leaves over a stream, filters through the cavities of a structure, or reflects off the exterior of Man's creation.  

I want it all to be something I can "play with" and artistically capture as my minds eye feels it.

Thus, the name of my web site is no accident - Shadows Dancing.
Who's says hard work, sweat, tears can not lead to dances of joy?

Need I say more?
Jack

PS:  And my hope is to do it all with the least amount of technology that the task will allow.  Not to say I won't use the best, just no more than is necessary to master the mission.

Quote from: Rudy Torres
Jack

If I may be so brave and I do apologize if I am overstepping my bounds, but it sounds like you're trying to fit your definition of Architectural Photography into a mold of convenience. My point is, I don't think all of your clients will agree with your mold.

Ashley has shown you some fantastic examples of a typical Architectural shoot. Architecture is more than just the basic lines of the structure.
It's the textures, colors, and shapes that make the building feel the way it does. But as Ashley has shown you, those elements, on occasion, will need some help. You need to be ready for that.

- Rudy
« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 01:09:35 pm by Lust4Life »
Logged
Jack

stevesanacore

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 267
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #57 on: October 18, 2009, 05:43:44 pm »

Quote from: adammork
I'm  a professional architectural photographer from Denmark - I often have this talk with a good colleague and dear friend of mine about the difference in European and American architectural photography on the subject light. As we sees it, the typical European Architectural photographer will not use any lights - we are here talking photography of architecture for the architects - take a look in European magazines, and books and see the difference, a good start will be, as mentioned before, "El Croquis"

Space are created with light and shadow both equally importen - architects, at least here in Scandinavia would dislike to show a space the way it's shown here, it's no longer a space, but a very well lit product like a jewel for a commercial.

I'm educated and have worked as an architect before starting photographing 8 years ago, and you can count on one hand how many times I have set up a lamp in a space.

This is not for starting a war between European and american photographers and between right and wrong :-) we are just some architectural photographers here in Europe that are amazed over the amount of light that are used in classic american architectural photography.

Very best,
Adam


I think many architectural photographers, (I did it exclusively for over ten years), have gotten some of their best shots, and love to shoot without lights. But we are not all so lucky to only have such spaces to shoot.  Much of what we all shoot requires lighting. The best shooters light so as not to advertise their work but to enhance the drama the architect intended.

About a third of my work is now architectural and I can't emphasize enough how important qualified assistants are on your shoots. As I get older and wiser, I always use a minimum of two and usually three assistants, in addition to a prop/stylist. The clients love the royal treatment and my work is easier and better.

Best of luck.

Steve

Logged
We don't know what we don't know.

Murray Fredericks

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 295
    • http://www.murrayfredericks.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #58 on: October 18, 2009, 05:52:05 pm »

Quote from: stevesanacore
I can't emphasize enough how important qualified assistants are on your shoots. As I get older and wiser, I always use a minimum of two and usually three assistants, in addition to a prop/stylist. The clients love the royal treatment and my work is easier and better.

It would be great to have that kind of budget from architects...

Logged
Exhibition Website   http://www.murrayfr

collum

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 189
    • http://www.jcollum.com
Becoming a great Architectural Photographer!?
« Reply #59 on: October 18, 2009, 07:41:55 pm »

a quick google came up with http://www.resortimages.com/ . Steve, I'm assuming this is your site.

   jim


Quote from: Yelhsa
What sort of stuff do you shoot Steve, that requires 'a minimum of two and usually three assistants, in addition to a prop/stylist'.
With a team like that, you sure must be working on some very big budget jobs.
Add the client and his team to that, plus the owners and whoever else may be around - and it would need to be a big space too... as that's quite a crowd.

For me, a good stylist is a 'must have' - especially as we focus more on the interior side of things - but I would only hire an assistant these days IF the budget was in place and / or I believed multiple sales were in order.
Assistants are great if you really need to get more done in a day; however, they are by no means a need item.

A 4 or 5 day shoot - where the client require 20+ images, for Multi-Media use, for at least 3 years - is the only time I'd work with a team as big as you are suggesting.

As for the 'royal treatment' - I would have to say, most clients I have work for, don't give a monkey's about that.
All they are interested in, is the results i.e. images which they can use to meet their needs.

So I'm curious... what sort of stuff do you shoot Steve, that regularly requires a team like this - but doesn't require MF back quality ?

Cheers,
Ashley

http://www.ampimage.com
http://www.ashleymorrison.com
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 8   Go Up