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Author Topic: As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...  (Read 4752 times)

dwood

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« on: December 21, 2008, 10:04:00 am »

and the high ISO performance is pretty decent...


[attachment=10454:NASApix05.jpg]

ErikKaffehr

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2008, 11:30:13 am »

You also get the optional tripod?

Erik

Quote from: dwood
and the high ISO performance is pretty decent...


[attachment=10454:NASApix05.jpg]
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Peter McLennan

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2008, 11:36:39 am »

Quote from: dwood
and the high ISO performance is pretty decent...


[attachment=10454:NASApix05.jpg]


Beautiful.  Is it a comp?  HDR?
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JohnBrew

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2008, 11:43:01 am »

Quote from: dwood
and the high ISO performance is pretty decent...


[attachment=10454:NASApix05.jpg]
Interesting that there is dust on the sensor!

dwood

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2008, 04:03:47 pm »

Quote from: JohnBrew
Interesting that there is dust on the sensor!
Yeah, that damn space dust.

BradSmith

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2008, 12:36:23 am »

A thought just occurred to me about all the photos I've seen of objects in orbit.   Where is the light coming from that is illuminating the parts of the shuttle that are NOT in the direct sun?  There isn't any blue sky up above to provide that diffuse shadow light.
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BernardLanguillier

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #7 on: December 25, 2008, 12:55:27 am »

Quote from: skeedracer
A thought just occurred to me about all the photos I've seen of objects in orbit.   Where is the light coming from that is illuminating the parts of the shuttle that are NOT in the direct sun?  There isn't any blue sky up above to provide that diffuse shadow light.

The earth itself should reflect a lot of light and serve as a giant fill.

Now in this particular image, could there be a bit of flash fill in or some HDR?

Cheers,
Bernard

ErikKaffehr

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #8 on: December 25, 2008, 01:51:10 am »

Interesting and good questions!

I guess that it may be a combination of things. Earth is obviously working as a fill light. I don't think that NASA would use flash, it would need a very big flash for that. Could be HDR or just NASA being able to suck a lot of details out of the shadows.

My experience is that there is an incredible lot of shadow detail to extract from DSLR shots. I tried HDR a lot but never got it working for me, I get the colors messed up and to many artifacts. I probably used the wrong tools, the wrong way for the wrong cases ;.) In my experience I always got better results exposing for the highlights and extracting shadow detail using "fill light".

Some of the "fill light" may come from the solar panels of the space telescope. They are not visible on the picture but satellites are normally powered by large solar panels.

Best regards
Erik



Quote from: BernardLanguillier
The earth itself should reflect a lot of light and serve as a giant fill.

Now in this particular image, could there be a bit of flash fill in or some HDR?

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: December 25, 2008, 01:54:57 am by ErikKaffehr »
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BradSmith

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #9 on: December 25, 2008, 05:32:19 pm »

Quote from: ErikKaffehr
Interesting and good questions!
I guess that it may be a combination of things. Earth is obviously working as a fill light. I don't think that NASA would use flash, it would need a very big flash for that. Could be HDR or just NASA being able to suck a lot of details out of the shadows..............Some of the "fill light" may come from the solar panels of the space telescope. They are not visible on the picture but satellites are normally powered by large solar panels.
Best regards
Erik
The reason I asked is that the side of the shuttle that is not in direct sun seems to be facing up, away from the reflected light of the earth.  And I also doubt that they'd be using flash.  Maybe reflection from the solar panels which would be behind the camera is the answer.   But obviously, there is some light coming from somewhere.
Brad
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fike

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2008, 09:41:29 am »

Is it possible that a flash would have a longer range in space because there is little or no atmosphere to bounce and reflect the light.  It would seem reasonable that the lack of water and dust particles that we see so much of on earth might be missing and enable a much brighter flash image.  I am also really struck by the accutance--sharpness- of the image--also possibly enhanced by a perfectly clear atmosphere.

As reflective lighting, you can see a blue reflection of earth in the glass windows of the cockpit.  If you look at the corner of he earth and consider the reflection on the windscreen, the earth is a really freaking large reflector up there.

It is interesting that nikon was singled out for the solicitation.  I know Nikon is abit more of a presence in science with their optics and microscope divisions.   I wonder why they want the strap eyelits removed?  Could they snag on things?  hmmm?
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Tony Beach

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2008, 12:42:59 pm »

The fill light could be coming from the moon, or even the stars perhaps.  It's a good question that I hadn't thought of and it would be interesting to find out what the answer was.
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Plekto

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As soon as NASA releases their new DSLR...
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2008, 06:25:39 pm »

The answer is to look at the little box attached to the arm.  There are spotlights on the arms that they are using to illuminate the bay area when the technician(s) are working.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2008, 06:26:05 pm by Plekto »
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