Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: tilt shift lens?  (Read 5873 times)

stacibeth

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 89
tilt shift lens?
« on: November 14, 2008, 12:19:20 pm »

I'm looking for a tilt shift or perspective control lens for my canon 1ds mark3, any suggestions? How's the nikon 24pc? compared to the canon 24ts? or is there a better option?

Thanks
Logged

Misirlou

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 711
    • http://
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2008, 12:34:38 pm »

I've only used the Canon, but I should think the hassles involved with trying to use the Nikon on a Canon body would probably outweigh any advantge the Nikon might have in optical quality.

There seems to be an increased interest in perspective control lenses of late. Perhaps that will spur the development of additional possibilities.
Logged

stever

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1245
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2008, 12:48:01 pm »

since the t-s lenses are manual, i'm not sure the nikon will necessarily be that much more hassle

Loyd Chambers has a review of both Canon and Nikon on a mk3 (digiloyd.com - may be in the subscription section, but probably woth the money considering lenses at this cost - also it's a pretty useful blog)

you can also rent the lenses and Nikon to Canon adapter at lensrentals.com and do your own comparison
Logged

Peterretep

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 127
    • http://www.mountainphotographics.com
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2008, 06:54:48 pm »

I have the Canon 24 Tilt shift bought new about 5 years ago and the Nikon 24 PC bought new about 11 years ago. Both are in like new condition. I did some testing this past year to see if there were any differences between the two. I tested them indoors in a well sunlit, south facing, two story ceiling, living room with a lot of windows. From the few shots I did where the camera was on a tripod and only switched out the lenses, I found my copies to be identical in sharpness, contrast, color rendition and CA. I couldn't pick one over the other. Each lens was shifted to its maximum where they both look pretty bad. With that said I still only use the Canon for my work. Occasionally I have need for the tilt but mostly would like to weld it in place. If you get the Canon beware of the tilt! It is very easy to have the lens with some tilt dialed in if your not paying close attention. I check it with every shot. A royal PIA.

Peter


Wolfman

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 263
    • www.bernardwolf.com
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2008, 09:48:33 pm »

Quote from: Peterretep
I have the Canon 24 Tilt shift bought new about 5 years ago and the Nikon 24 PC bought new about 11 years ago. Both are in like new condition. I did some testing this past year to see if there were any differences between the two. I tested them indoors in a well sunlit, south facing, two story ceiling, living room with a lot of windows. From the few shots I did where the camera was on a tripod and only switched out the lenses, I found my copies to be identical in sharpness, contrast, color rendition and CA. I couldn't pick one over the other. Each lens was shifted to its maximum where they both look pretty bad. With that said I still only use the Canon for my work. Occasionally I have need for the tilt but mostly would like to weld it in place. If you get the Canon beware of the tilt! It is very easy to have the lens with some tilt dialed in if your not paying close attention. I check it with every shot. A royal PIA.

Peter


I believe you meant the Nikon 28 pc, not the 24, if you got it 11 years ago. The 24 Nikon t/s was announced this year.

JeffKohn

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1668
    • http://jeffk-photo.typepad.com
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2008, 02:13:12 am »

GBPhoto is correct. You would have to use a compatible Nikon body (one that supports VR lenses) to set the aperture, and then when you mounted the lens on a Canon body you wouldn't be able to change the aperture.
Logged
Jeff Kohn
[url=http://ww

Jonathan H

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 115
    • http://
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2008, 01:51:03 pm »

I just picked up a Hartblei Super-Rotator for my 5D.  Comes in a native-Canon EF mount and is supposed to have excellent optical performance.  Best of all, I paid $350.

Hoping to play with it this weekend over the short vacation.
Logged
Long walks on the beach, nights by the f

JeffKohn

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1668
    • http://jeffk-photo.typepad.com
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2008, 03:52:24 pm »

Quote from: John Schweikert
How is the 24 PC-E different from the 14-24mm? They both don't have aperture rings. The 14-24 with that adapter works on Canon bodies to adjust aperture so why won't the 24mm? They are both G style lenses that do require a Nikon body to control aperture but the 16-9 adapter has overcome that.
The PC-E lenses actually _do_ have aperture rings, but they don't have the aperture lever as Alan pointed out. The PC-E aperture mechanism is completely different from other Nikon lenses including "G" lenses. I doubt you'll see a PC-E -> EOS adapter any time soon.
Logged
Jeff Kohn
[url=http://ww

Slough

  • Guest
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2008, 05:45:54 pm »

Quote from: JeffKohn
GBPhoto is correct. You would have to use a compatible Nikon body (one that supports VR lenses) to set the aperture, and then when you mounted the lens on a Canon body you wouldn't be able to change the aperture.

Is that correct? It is true that in Nikon land the PC-E lenses will only work on VR compatible cameras, and the electronic aperture only works on the most recent cameras such as the D300. But it has a manual aperture ring, and a button with which to manually stop down the lens. But I believe that the lens needs power via the electronic linkages in order to stop the lens down, either when the aperture button is depressed, or the shutter is triggered. So on second thoughts I think that you are right. Without power going to the electronic couplings, you ain't got a hope of using the lens. (Well, actually there is a frig according to B. Rorslett, but it requires first mounting it on a compatible camera. I do not know the details. Maybe once stopped down, if the lens is unmounted, the aperture stays stopped down? But then how do you focus! )

Some user reports suggest that the Nikon lens is a step or two above the Canon, which is not surprising as it is much more recent.
Logged

Kirk Gittings

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1561
    • http://www.KirkGittings.com
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2008, 05:57:04 pm »

"Some user reports suggest that the Nikon lens is a step or two above the Canon, which is not surprising as it is much more recent. "

FWIW, I have done some casual testing between the two. I would say that the Nikon is slightly better than the Canon. I make my living largely with the Canon 24 T/S and I was hoping the Nikon would be significantly better, but I didn't see it. If you are buying into a new system buy Nikon, every little bit helps. If you already are deeply into Canon, I wouldn't switch. Just my opinion.
Logged
Thanks,
Kirk Gittings

Slough

  • Guest
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2008, 08:20:41 am »

Quote from: Kirk Gittings
"Some user reports suggest that the Nikon lens is a step or two above the Canon, which is not surprising as it is much more recent. "

FWIW, I have done some casual testing between the two. I would say that the Nikon is slightly better than the Canon. I make my living largely with the Canon 24 T/S and I was hoping the Nikon would be significantly better, but I didn't see it. If you are buying into a new system buy Nikon, every little bit helps. If you already are deeply into Canon, I wouldn't switch. Just my opinion.

Interesting to know. I guess there are not that many people with direct experience of both.
Logged

T.Kaercher

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2008, 08:39:58 am »

Quote from: stacibeth
I'm looking for a tilt shift or perspective control lens for my canon 1ds mark3, any suggestions? How's the nikon 24pc? compared to the canon 24ts? or is there a better option?

Thanks


Hi there!

If you are looking for real good TS lenses, you have a look a this link.

http://www.hartblei.de/en/index.htm

These lenses are super!!!

Stay tuned.

Thomas

Fotografie
Thomas Kärcher
Finningerstr. 56
89231 Neu-Ulm
Germany
Phone +49-(0)731-79856
Fax +49-(0)731-723613
Mobile +49-(0)171-3440508
Mail mail@kaercher-fotografie.de
Web www.kaercher-fotografie.de







Logged
Fotografie
Thomas Kärcher
Finningerstr. 56
89231 Neu-Ulm
Germany
Phone +49-(0)731-79856
Fax +49-(0)731-723613
Mobile +49-(0)171-3440508
Mail mail@kaercher-fotografie.de
Web www.kaercher-fotografie.de
Blog http://blog.kaercher-fotografie.de

rethmeier

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 795
    • http://www.willemrethmeier.com
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2008, 03:52:26 pm »

Logged
Willem Rethmeier
www.willemrethmeier.com

Mark F

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 365
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2008, 10:26:53 pm »

I for one would love tyo hear what you think of the lens. If it works on your 5D I assume it would work on the 1Ds3?


 
Quote from: Jonathan H
I just picked up a Hartblei Super-Rotator for my 5D.  Comes in a native-Canon EF mount and is supposed to have excellent optical performance.  Best of all, I paid $350.

Hoping to play with it this weekend over the short vacation.
Logged
Mark

AlanG

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 195
    • http://www.goldsteinphoto.com
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2008, 10:56:06 pm »

The shortest Hartblei is 45mm.  The 40mm Zeiss/Hartblei is just a protype that they have been showing for years.  So wide angle on 35mm is out of the question with Hartbleis.  This in no way compares with the 24mm TSE. Hartblei lenses are basically 6x6 lenses that can also be purchased in mounts for 35mm. They are pretty big and heavy for the smaller format. The mechanisms could be re-designed for the 24x36 format to allow for much more movement to take advantage of the large image circle that they project.  It is my understanding that the optics are the same as what is found in Kiev/Arsenal lenses but with the addition of the Hartblei mechanism.  The Super rotator mechanism is very nice.

http://araxfoto.com/lenses/

I have some of these and have tested others.  I own and like the 55 4.5 shift but it is very big and heavy.  It is nicely made, sharp and has a very good shifting mechanism that works by simply turning a collar.  I also have the 80mm tilt/shift which I don't use too often but seems ok.  The thread on this is very fine so you have to turn and turn it to shift the lens all the way. I tested a friend's 35mm tilt/shift and it was way inferior to my Nikon 35mm PC.  I also own a Nikkor 28mm PC and Canon 24 and 45 TSE lenses.  All for use on Canon full frame bodies.  The Canon TSE mounts do not have the versatility of the Hartblei Super Rotator mount as the shift and tilt on the Canon lenses are always fixed in relation to each other. (The orientation can only be changed by dis-assembling the mount.)  But the Canon lenses have the advantage of electronic aperture linkage which allows you to work wide-open.  I don't know how the optical performance of the Hartblei 45 compares with the Canon 45 TSE.

I tried the Arsat shift adapter that lets one mount Arsat and other Pentacon mount 6x6 lenses onto 35mm cameras.  This could be a handy way of getting a number of inexpensive longer shift lenses. The one I had was miss-aligned, so the image was not in focus across the frame.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2008, 11:06:46 pm by AlanG »
Logged
Alan Goldstein
[url=http://www.Goldstein

Stefan.Steib

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 470
    • HCam - Hartblei Pro Photography solutions
tilt shift lens?
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2008, 05:14:02 pm »

Alan

you err. The new Hartblei versions are freely available and you can buy them any time !
The website is www.hartblei.de and the prices are to be found here :  http://hartblei.de/en/pricelist.htm (old list)
whereas we are at the launch of new products , a photo is already here on this thread.
No more comment about this one...........;-)
The old "russian glass" versions are not built anymore.

If anybody wants to see some samples from Hartblei go here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hartblei/

I have done some sample pics already with the new 5d II at the openhous at DinkelPhoto here in Munich last saturday
and I can tell you this will be an impressive combination.

Greetings from Munich

Stefan Steib CEO Hartblei Kiev-München


Quote from: AlanG
The shortest Hartblei is 45mm.  The 40mm Zeiss/Hartblei is just a protype that they have been showing for years.  So wide angle on 35mm is out of the question with Hartbleis.  This in no way compares with the 24mm TSE. Hartblei lenses are basically 6x6 lenses that can also be purchased in mounts for 35mm. They are pretty big and heavy for the smaller format. The mechanisms could be re-designed for the 24x36 format to allow for much more movement to take advantage of the large image circle that they project.  It is my understanding that the optics are the same as what is found in Kiev/Arsenal lenses but with the addition of the Hartblei mechanism.  The Super rotator mechanism is very nice.

http://araxfoto.com/lenses/

I have some of these and have tested others.  I own and like the 55 4.5 shift but it is very big and heavy.  It is nicely made, sharp and has a very good shifting mechanism that works by simply turning a collar.  I also have the 80mm tilt/shift which I don't use too often but seems ok.  The thread on this is very fine so you have to turn and turn it to shift the lens all the way. I tested a friend's 35mm tilt/shift and it was way inferior to my Nikon 35mm PC.  I also own a Nikkor 28mm PC and Canon 24 and 45 TSE lenses.  All for use on Canon full frame bodies.  The Canon TSE mounts do not have the versatility of the Hartblei Super Rotator mount as the shift and tilt on the Canon lenses are always fixed in relation to each other. (The orientation can only be changed by dis-assembling the mount.)  But the Canon lenses have the advantage of electronic aperture linkage which allows you to work wide-open.  I don't know how the optical performance of the Hartblei 45 compares with the Canon 45 TSE.

I tried the Arsat shift adapter that lets one mount Arsat and other Pentacon mount 6x6 lenses onto 35mm cameras.  This could be a handy way of getting a number of inexpensive longer shift lenses. The one I had was miss-aligned, so the image was not in focus across the frame.
Logged
Because Photography is more than Technology and "as we have done it before".
Pages: [1]   Go Up