Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Bag/Backpack Hacking  (Read 5025 times)

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1301
    • David Sutton Photography
Bag/Backpack Hacking
« on: June 07, 2008, 04:36:14 am »

Does anyone else find that as soon as they buy a bag or backpack, they want to redesign it? Well of course the great thing is that armed with some foam, glue, knife and fabric, you can.
Yes, I want a mirror lock-up button on my camera, but putting one in with a drill press and soldering iron is not something I particularly want to explore. But I can hack a bag to my heart's content. Starting with removing all those labels that shout "camera".

Slingshot 100 AW
                               I've always liked this bag. It's small, comfortable for a few hours, and I can carry it round a city or in a cafe and feel anonymous. Enough pockets and tabs outside to carry or attach stuff.
But when I got a 40D the Slingshot would never take the new camera and a 70-200 f4 and 24-105. Enter the custom insert (sitting on the white paper below).
[attachment=6946:attachment]
Some velcro glued underneath and on tabs holds it in place. Add a small camera case to hold filters:
[attachment=6947:attachment]
Here's the layout with the other lens, and filter bag attached:
[attachment=6948:attachment]
Finally, an old ammunition pouch makes a good case for a flash on a belt.
[attachment=6949:attachment]
Thank you for your indulgence. David
Logged

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1301
    • David Sutton Photography
Bag/Backpack Hacking
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2008, 05:00:41 am »

Kata R103
                   I was looking for a backpack to carry camera gear, laptop and sundries on a plane as carry-on. Number one on my list was weight (with cabin baggage limited to 7kg on many airlines).
Pros:  -just under 2kg
         -a good size with a laptop compartment
         -fairly bullet proof
         -you can access just the camera with the tripod attached
         -good tripod holder
Cons: -the top is rounded not square (do they think I want to carry bananas?)
         - it looks a bit "funky"
         -no waistbelt that you'd actually want to use
I only go hiking 4 or 5 times a year, but although the shoulder straps and harness are well thought out, the lack of support on the hips becomes a pain in the neck (literally) after 4 or 5 hours.
However the laptop compartment will take lunch and a Gortex jacket and emergency gear and there is ample room inside for camera stuff and extra rations (I can never carry enough chocolate). Enter the Osprey hip belt:
[attachment=6950:attachment]
I had it attached for a small sum. Here is the detail on where the detachable clips are stitched:
[attachment=6951:attachment]
So far I've only tried this out for a half hour walk fully loaded. Getting the weight balanced about 60% to the hips and 40% to the shoulders seems to work well. There is a good air gap between my back and the pack, which I need in order not to overheat. It looks promising.
Cheers, David
Logged

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1301
    • David Sutton Photography
Bag/Backpack Hacking
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2008, 05:05:49 am »

The Gladstone Bag.
                                 I often go to Victorian and Edwardian events and carrying a modern camera bag is a bit out of place when wearing a frock coat or top hat. This is a project still under development:
[attachment=6952:attachment]
[attachment=6953:attachment]
Cheers, David
Logged

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1301
    • David Sutton Photography
Bag/Backpack Hacking
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2008, 05:12:39 am »

Quote
Kata R103
                   I was looking for a backpack to carry camera gear, laptop and sundries on a plane as carry-on. Number one on my list was weight (with cabin baggage limited to 7kg on many airlines).
Pros:  -just under 2kg
         -a good size with a laptop compartment
         -fairly bullet proof
         -you can access just the camera with the tripod attached
         -good tripod holder
Cons: -the top is rounded not square (do they think I want to carry bananas?)
         - it looks a bit "funky"
         -no waistbelt that you'd actually want to use
I only go hiking 4 or 5 times a year, but although the shoulder straps and harness are well thought out, the lack of support on the hips becomes a pain in the neck (literally) after 4 or 5 hours.
However the laptop compartment will take lunch and a Gortex jacket and emergency gear and there is ample room inside for camera stuff and extra rations (I can never carry enough chocolate). Enter the Osprey hip belt:
[attachment=6950:attachment]
I had it attached for a small sum. Here is the detail on where the detachable clips are stitched:
[attachment=6951:attachment]
So far I've only tried this out for a half hour walk fully loaded. Getting the weight balanced about 60% to the hips and 40% to the shoulders seems to work well. There is a good air gap between my back and the pack, which I need in order not to overheat. It looks promising.
Cheers, David
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=200236\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Just a note to say that having thoroughly used the Kata fully laden with the Osprey belt attached, it works very well.
Getting most of the weight off my shoulders has meant going most of the day without getting tired or sore.
So if you have a backpack that works in all other respects, but is hard on the shoulders, I recommend finding a good hipbelt, attaching it and trying that out before going to the expense of buy a trecking or technical pack. David
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up