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Author Topic: Inkjet vs. Photographic enlargements  (Read 17042 times)

douglasboyd

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Inkjet vs. Photographic enlargements
« Reply #20 on: December 23, 2007, 11:23:44 am »

Yes, downsampling and down profiling has introduced some color posterization in my posted test image.  This is not present in my original AdobeRGB file. and not an issue in the prints.  And yes there is extreme color manipulation in this image.  I generally take saturation all the way to the limit in aRGB until I begin to see color artifacts.  This means that the colors are very close tte the maximum values, 255, leaving not much margin for error.  This seems to be the Peter Lik technique.  The difference I saw so far between Inkjet and RA4 processing is not so much in the gamat and profiling but that the high gloss surfaces seem to show deeply saturated colors so much better.  It is easy to get this high gloss with the silver halide process, but thanks to the comments on this thread, I realize that I should also be able to get the super gloss effect with inkjet using either lamination, or selected papers.  Thanks to everyone.

==Doug


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On my color calibrated monitors, that image looks to have some very extreme color manipulations applied to it (the reds don't look like real world colors to me). And the tonal transitions as these extremities are approached look very harsh and discontiguous.

I would expect an inkjet to accurately (as possible) try to mimic these colors and tones and thereby deliver something that doesn't look all that great. It may be that when using a chemical process to reproduce this image that indeed you get something smoother and more pleasing since there may be some sort of softening of the harshness, and natural degradation of the extreme colors.
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TMcCulley

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Inkjet vs. Photographic enlargements
« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2007, 12:16:27 pm »

Quote
It is easy to get this high gloss with the silver halide process, but thanks to the comments on this thread, I realize that I should also be able to get the super gloss effect with inkjet using either lamination, or selected papers.  Thanks to everyone.

==Doug
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Doug,

Please do not leave us in the dark on your search to duplicate the look that Peter Lik gets with his prints.  Would really like to see and hear about the techniques that you do finally use.

Tom
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Farmer

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Inkjet vs. Photographic enlargements
« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2007, 04:46:54 pm »

Doug,

Out of interest, attached is a visual representation of the Poli colour space you lined me to and an Epson Pro 11880 on EFP from the Pixel Genius profile.

The Epson has a much larger gamut in most areas, but in some the Poli goes further.

You can view all this yourself at http://back.iccview.de/index_eng.htm - just upload the profiles you want to compare.
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Phil Brown
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